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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

The 4 June 1999 Derecho Event: A Particularly Difficult Challenge For Numerical Weather Prediction, William A. Gallus Jr., James Correia Jr., Isidora Jankov Oct 2005

The 4 June 1999 Derecho Event: A Particularly Difficult Challenge For Numerical Weather Prediction, William A. Gallus Jr., James Correia Jr., Isidora Jankov

Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Publications

Warm season convective system rainfall forecasts remain a particularly difficult forecast challenge. For these events, it is possible that ensemble forecasts would provide helpful information unavailable in a single deterministic forecast. In this study, an intense derecho event accompanied by a well-organized band of heavy rainfall is used to show that for some situations, the predictability of rainfall even within a 12-24-h period is so low that a wide range of simulations using different models, different physical parameterizations, and different initial conditions all fail to provide even a small signal that the event will occur. The failure of a wide ...


Historical Development And Applications Of The Epic And Apex Models, Philip W. Gassman, Jimmy R. Williams, Verel W. Benson, R. César Izaurralde, Larry M. Hauck, C. Allan Jones, Jay Atwood, James R. Kiniry, Joan D. Flowers Jun 2005

Historical Development And Applications Of The Epic And Apex Models, Philip W. Gassman, Jimmy R. Williams, Verel W. Benson, R. César Izaurralde, Larry M. Hauck, C. Allan Jones, Jay Atwood, James R. Kiniry, Joan D. Flowers

CARD Working Papers

The development of the field-scale Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator (EPIC) model was initiated in 1981 to support assessments of soil erosion impacts on soil productivity for soil, climate, and cropping conditions representative of a broad spectrum of U.S. agricultural production regions. The first major application of EPIC was a national analysis performed in support of the 1985 Resources Conservation Act (RCA) assessment. The model has continuously evolved since that time and has been applied for a wide range of field, regional, and national studies both in the U.S. and in other countries. The range of EPIC applications has ...


Decline And Recovery Of A High Arctic Wolf-Prey System, L. David Mech Jan 2005

Decline And Recovery Of A High Arctic Wolf-Prey System, L. David Mech

USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

A long-existing system of wolves (Canis lupus), muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), and arctic hares (Lepus arcticus) in a 2600 km2 area of Canada’s High Arctic (80° N latitude) began collapsing in 1997 because of unusual adverse summer weather but recovered to a level at which all three species were reproducing by 2004. Recovery of wolf presence and reproduction appeared to be more dependent on muskox increase than on hare increase.

Un vieux système biologique composé de loups (Canis lupus), de boeufs musqués (Ovibos moschatus) et de lièvres arctiques (Lepus arcticus), occupant 2600 km2 de l’Extrême-Arctique canadien (80 ...


Global Warming Is Changing The Dynamics Of Arctic Host-Parasite Systems, S. J. Kutz, Eric P. Hoberg, L. Polley, E. J. Jenkins Jan 2005

Global Warming Is Changing The Dynamics Of Arctic Host-Parasite Systems, S. J. Kutz, Eric P. Hoberg, L. Polley, E. J. Jenkins

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Global climate change is altering the ecology of infectious agents and driving the emergence of disease in people, domestic animals, and wildlife. We present a novel, empirically based, predictive model for the impact of climate warming on development rates and availability of an important parasitic nematode of muskoxen in the Canadian Arctic, a region that is particularly vulnerable to climate change. Using this model, we show that warming in the Arctic may have already radically altered the transmission dynamics of this parasite, escalating infection pressure for muskoxen, and that this trend is expected to continue. This work establishes a foundation ...


Beringia: Intercontinental Exchange And Diversification Of High Latitude Mammals And Their Parasites During The Pliocene And Quarternary, Joseph A. Cook, Eric P. Hoberg, Anson Koehler, Heikki Henttonen, Lotta Wickström, Voitto Haukisalmi, Kurt Galbreath, Felix Chernyavski, Nikolai Dokuchaev, Anatoli Lahzuhtkin, Stephen O. Macdonald, Andrew Hope, Eric Waltari, Amy Runck, Alasdair Veitch, Richard Popko, Emily Jenkins, Susan Kutz, Ralph Eckerlin Jan 2005

Beringia: Intercontinental Exchange And Diversification Of High Latitude Mammals And Their Parasites During The Pliocene And Quarternary, Joseph A. Cook, Eric P. Hoberg, Anson Koehler, Heikki Henttonen, Lotta Wickström, Voitto Haukisalmi, Kurt Galbreath, Felix Chernyavski, Nikolai Dokuchaev, Anatoli Lahzuhtkin, Stephen O. Macdonald, Andrew Hope, Eric Waltari, Amy Runck, Alasdair Veitch, Richard Popko, Emily Jenkins, Susan Kutz, Ralph Eckerlin

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Beringia is the region spanning eastern Asia and northwestern North America that remained ice-free during the full glacial events of the Pleistocene. Numerous questions persist regarding the importance of this region in the evolution of northern faunas. Beringia has been implicated as both a high latitude refugium and as the crossroads (Bering Land Bridge) of the northern continents for boreal mammals. The Beringian Coevolution Project (BCP) is an international collaboration that has provided material to assess the pattern and timing of faunal exchange across the crossroads of the northern continents and the potential impact of past climatic events on differentiation ...