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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Nitrogen Fertilization Has A Stronger Effect On Soil Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterial Communities Than Elevated Atmospheric Co2, Sean Berthrong, Chris Yeager, Laverne Gallegos-Graves, Blaire Steven, Stephanie Eichorst, Robert Jackson, Cheryl Kuske Feb 2016

Nitrogen Fertilization Has A Stronger Effect On Soil Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterial Communities Than Elevated Atmospheric Co2, Sean Berthrong, Chris Yeager, Laverne Gallegos-Graves, Blaire Steven, Stephanie Eichorst, Robert Jackson, Cheryl Kuske

Sean Berthrong

Biological nitrogen fixation is the primary supply of N to most ecosystems, yet there is considerable uncertainty about how N-fixing bacteria will respond to global change factors such as increasing atmospheric CO2 and N deposition. Using the nifH gene as a molecular marker, we studied how the community structure of N-fixing soil bacteria from temperate pine, aspen, and sweet gum stands and a brackish tidal marsh responded to multiyear elevated CO2 conditions. We also examined how N availability, specifically, N fertilization, interacted with elevated CO2 to affect these communities in the temperate pine forest. Based on data from Sanger sequencing ...


Environmental Issues For The 21st Century And Their Impact On Human Health, Richard B. Philp Dec 2011

Environmental Issues For The 21st Century And Their Impact On Human Health, Richard B. Philp

Richard B. Philp

This book (see contents attached) is now available from the author on CD


London Free Press And Sun Media: Reader Beware Of Bias., Richard B. Philp Dec 2011

London Free Press And Sun Media: Reader Beware Of Bias., Richard B. Philp

Richard B. Philp

Recent articles in the London Free Press, a Sun Media publication, have attempted to discredit environmentalists concerned about climate change and the environmental impact of the Alberta tar sands. Articles by authors with right wing leanings (but not so identified) have appeared in the news pages rather than in the editorial pages where they belong.These have promoted the tar sands and their related pipelines, suggested an American conspiracy to influence public opinion by funding Canadian environmental groups and attempted to resurrect the so-called e-mail scandal from climate scientists. The present paper offers a rebuttal to these claims with supporting ...


Effects Of Increased Pco2 And Temperature On The North Atlantic Spring Bloom: Iii. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate, P.A. Lee, J.R. Rudisill, A.R. Neeley, D.A. Hutchins, Y. Feng, C.E. Hare, K. Leblanc, J.M. Rose, Steven Wilhelm, J.M. Rowe, G.R. Ditullio Dec 2008

Effects Of Increased Pco2 And Temperature On The North Atlantic Spring Bloom: Iii. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate, P.A. Lee, J.R. Rudisill, A.R. Neeley, D.A. Hutchins, Y. Feng, C.E. Hare, K. Leblanc, J.M. Rose, Steven Wilhelm, J.M. Rowe, G.R. Ditullio

Steven Wilhelm

The CLAW hypothesis argues that a negative feedback mechanism involving phytoplankton-derived dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) could mitigate increasing sea surface temperatures that result from global warming. DMSP is converted to the climatically active dimethylsulfide (DMS), which is transferred to the atmosphere and photochemically oxidized to sulfate aerosols, leading to increases in planetary albedo and cooling of the Earth’s atmosphere. A shipboard incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of increased temperature and pCO2 on the algal community structure of the North Atlantic spring bloom and their subsequent impact on particulate and dissolved DMSP concentrations (DMSPp and DMSPd). Under ...