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Taxonomic Notes On Velvet Ants Of The Genus Timulla Ashmead, 1899 (Hymenoptera: Mutillidae) In The United States Of America And Canada, George C. Waldren May 2024

Taxonomic Notes On Velvet Ants Of The Genus Timulla Ashmead, 1899 (Hymenoptera: Mutillidae) In The United States Of America And Canada, George C. Waldren

Insecta Mundi

The exclusively New World velvet ant genus Timulla Ashmead, 1899 (Hymenoptera: Mutillidae: Mutillinae: Trogaspidiini) contains 180 species and ten subspecies. Most of these species are known from a single sex, and the validity of the subspecies has not been evaluated since their original description in 1937 and 1938. The Timulla fauna of the United States of America includes thirty species and eight subspecies, and the fauna of Canada includes three species. The faunas of these two countries were critically studied with the following results. Out of the eight total subspecies, seven were found to be structurally identical to and sympatric …


The Velvet Ants (Hymenoptera: Mutillidae): Systematics, Biology, And Biogeography Of A Little-Known Family, George Charles Waldren May 2021

The Velvet Ants (Hymenoptera: Mutillidae): Systematics, Biology, And Biogeography Of A Little-Known Family, George Charles Waldren

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations, Spring 1920 to Summer 2023

Insects are a ubiquitous and species-rich component of the biologically-diverse planet we inhabit. The majority of insects are understudied, with many species awaiting formal description and their natural history yet to be discovered. Members of the family Mutillidae, commonly known as velvet ants, are one of these little-known insect groups. Velvet ants are technically wasps, and the wingless females superficially resemble true ants of the family Formicidae. Further, they frequently have a ‘velvety’ appearance and are often brightly colored to serve as a warning to would-be predators that they have the ability to inflict a painful sting. These insects are …


A Remarkable Tiphiiform Wasp In Mid-Cretaceous Amber From Myanmar (Hymenoptera: Tiphiidae), Michael S. Engel, Jaime Ortega-Blanco, Daniel J. Bennett Jan 2009

A Remarkable Tiphiiform Wasp In Mid-Cretaceous Amber From Myanmar (Hymenoptera: Tiphiidae), Michael S. Engel, Jaime Ortega-Blanco, Daniel J. Bennett

Faculty Publications

The first tiphiid wasp (Aculeata: Euaculeata: Vespoidea: Tiphiiformes) in Cretaceous amber is described and figured. Thanatotiphia nyx, new genus and species, is represented by a male entombed in mid-Cretaceous (latest Albian) amber from Myanmar. Thanatotiphia possesses remarkable apomorphies in wing venation, lacks key traits of modern subfamilies, and is thus classified in a new subfamily, Thanatotiphiinae. The fossil is further shown to be nested well within the family, indicating that major lineages of Tiphiidae diverged by the mid-Cretaceous. The new taxon is compared with modern tiphiid subfamilies and the sparse fossil history of the family briefly overviewed.