Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Journal

1997

Gulf of Mexico

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Benthic-Pelagic Coupling In Northern Gulf Of Mexico Estuaries: Do Benthos Feed Directly On Phytoplankton?, Gary R. Gaston, Carol M. Cleveland, Steven S. Brown, Chet F. Rakocinski Jan 1997

Benthic-Pelagic Coupling In Northern Gulf Of Mexico Estuaries: Do Benthos Feed Directly On Phytoplankton?, Gary R. Gaston, Carol M. Cleveland, Steven S. Brown, Chet F. Rakocinski

Gulf and Caribbean Research

Few of the dominant benthic taxa of the northern Gulf of Mexico feed directly on phytoplankton. Rather, most of them feed on near-bottom seston and detritus. This is in contrast to models for Chesapeake Bay and San Francisco Bay. We found that detritivores represented over 80% of the macrobenthic organisms and over 90% of the biomass in Gulf of Mexico estuaries. The paucity of benthos that consumed phytoplankton led us to hypothesize that macrobenthos in Gulf of Mexico estuaries had less effect on plankton communities than was documented in U.S. east coast and west coast estuaries, where benthic communities ...


Observations Of Sea Turtles And Other Marine Life At The Explosive Removal Of Offshore Oil And Gas Structures In The Gulf Of Mexico, Gregg R. Gitschlag, Bryan A. Herczeg, Theresa R. Barcak Jan 1997

Observations Of Sea Turtles And Other Marine Life At The Explosive Removal Of Offshore Oil And Gas Structures In The Gulf Of Mexico, Gregg R. Gitschlag, Bryan A. Herczeg, Theresa R. Barcak

Gulf and Caribbean Research

Observers monitored the explosive removal of oil and gas structures in the Gulf of Mexico to protect sea turtles and marine mammals from adverse impacts. More than 7,000 monitoring hours at 131 structure removals were conducted during 1993. Sixteen individual sea turtles were observed including 6 loggerheads, 1 Kemp's ridley, 1 green, and 8 unidentified sea turtles. Aerial surveys were approximately ten times more effective in observing sea turtles than day or night surface surveys.


Northern Record For The Zooxanthellate Scleractinian Coral Siderastrea Siderea (Ellis And Solander) From The Gulf Of Mexico, William W. Schroeder, Thomas S. Hopkins Jan 1997

Northern Record For The Zooxanthellate Scleractinian Coral Siderastrea Siderea (Ellis And Solander) From The Gulf Of Mexico, William W. Schroeder, Thomas S. Hopkins

Gulf and Caribbean Research

We report a northward range extension of the zooxanthellate scleractinian coral Siderastrea siderea (Ellis and Solander) in the Gulf of Mexico. Several small, living colonies of S. siderea have been obtained in dredge samples from a site located at 29º 55.5' N, 087º 28.4' W in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Prior to these collections the northernmost occurrence of S. siderea in the Gulf of Mexico was reported as 27º 54.5' N, 093º 35.8' W, on the East Flower Garden Bank, in the western Gulf of Mexico. In the eastern Gulf of Mexico, S. siderea is ...