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Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

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Articles 4351 - 4374 of 4374

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The Effect Of Protein Level And Added Amino Acids In Sorghum Grain-Soybean Meal Rations For Swine, B A. Koch, R D. Howard, Donald H. Kropf, Robert H. Hines Jan 1968

The Effect Of Protein Level And Added Amino Acids In Sorghum Grain-Soybean Meal Rations For Swine, B A. Koch, R D. Howard, Donald H. Kropf, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

More information is needed on the optimum level of protein in sorghum grain-soybean meal rations for swine. Theoretically the protein value of a swine ration should be improved if the most limiting amino acids are added. This experiment was conducted to determine the most favorable level of protein in sorghum grain-soybean meal rations and the effect of added lysine and methionine.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, September 26, 1968


Estrus Synchronization In Swine: Trials With Aimax (I.C.I. 33,838), G Kiracofe, B A. Koch, Robert H. Hines Jan 1968

Estrus Synchronization In Swine: Trials With Aimax (I.C.I. 33,838), G Kiracofe, B A. Koch, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Several methods of synchronizing estrus have been tried in swine. One of the oldest and most commonly used natural methods is weaning pigs from a group of sows simultaneously. When this is done, the majority of sows will show estrus 3 to 7 days later if the sows have been nursed for at least 3 weeks. This method is effective and highly fertile; however, in some cases it is not practical to breed at this time and a natural method of synchronization in gilts is not available.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, September 26, 1968


The Value Of Chlortetracycline (Aureomycin) And Sulfamethazine Fed Independently And In Combination To Weanling Beef Calves Following Shipment, C.L. Drake, L.I. Smart, E.F. Smith Jan 1968

The Value Of Chlortetracycline (Aureomycin) And Sulfamethazine Fed Independently And In Combination To Weanling Beef Calves Following Shipment, C.L. Drake, L.I. Smart, E.F. Smith

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two hundred weaning calves were received in two shipments and placed on experiment. The calves were weighed, ear tagged and tattooed as rapidly as possible after being received, and were treated as follows: Treatment A - No oral medication (Control) Treatment B - Fed 350 mg. sulfamethazinel per head daily Treatment C - Fed 350 mg. chlortetracycline per head daily Treatment D - Fed 350 mg. sulfamethazine and 350 mg. chlortetracycline per head daily The cattle were fed sorghum silage to consumption and 3 lbs. sorghum grain (containing the medication) per head daily. They were injected with 10cc Combiotic (penicillin and streptomycin) when fever ...


Different Methods Of Managing Bluestem Pastures, E.F. Smith, Clenton E. Owensby, S.P. Kolstad Jan 1968

Different Methods Of Managing Bluestem Pastures, E.F. Smith, Clenton E. Owensby, S.P. Kolstad

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Studied were the effects of early season heavy stocking and burning on cattle performance, productivity of pastures and range condition as determined by plant population changes. The objective of early season heavy stocking at twice the normal rate for the first half the growing season is to obtain more gain per acre, have cattle available for dry lot finishing at mid summer and determine if the grass will recover the last half of the season. Forage quality is best early in the growing season.


The Value Of Dehydrated Alfalfa And Delayed Grain Feeding Young Cows On Winter Bluestem, E.F. Smith, D. Richardson, C.L. Drake, M.C. Hall Jan 1968

The Value Of Dehydrated Alfalfa And Delayed Grain Feeding Young Cows On Winter Bluestem, E.F. Smith, D. Richardson, C.L. Drake, M.C. Hall

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two primary objectives of this test were to: (1) compared dehydrated alfalfa with soybean oil meal as a winter supplemental feed on bluestem pasture for young cows to be bred shortly after the winter feeding period. (2) Determine any merit in feeding grain the last 50 days of the winter period compared with feeding the same total amount of grain throughout the winter when heifers are to be bred shortly after the winter feeding period.


High Protein Sorghum Grain With No Added Protein In All Concentrate Cattle Finishing Rations; Urea And Soybean Oil Meal In All Concentrate Rations, E.F. Smith, D. Richardson, C.L. Drake, B.E. Brent Jan 1968

High Protein Sorghum Grain With No Added Protein In All Concentrate Cattle Finishing Rations; Urea And Soybean Oil Meal In All Concentrate Rations, E.F. Smith, D. Richardson, C.L. Drake, B.E. Brent

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Trials at several research centers as well as in Kansas (Bulletin 483, page 32) have shown roughage may be satisfactorily omitted from finishing rations for cattle and doing so, often reduces feed required per pound of gain. That has made it feasible to try to finish cattle on all grain diet5, when the grain has sufficient protein, and to omit other protein sources as well as roughage. Other research on this subject is reported in Kansas Bulletins 493 and 507 and on page in this bulletin.


Sorghum Grain As The Only Protein Source In All-Concentrate Heifer Finishing Rations: Two Levels Of Year In An All-Concentrate Ration, E.F. Smith, D. Richardson, C.L. Drake, B.E. Brent Jan 1968

Sorghum Grain As The Only Protein Source In All-Concentrate Heifer Finishing Rations: Two Levels Of Year In An All-Concentrate Ration, E.F. Smith, D. Richardson, C.L. Drake, B.E. Brent

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Tests reporting on sorghum grain as the only protein source in a diet for finishing cattle are reported in Kansas Agr. Expt. Station Bulletins 493 and 507 and on page 24 in this bulletin. The three rations fed are show in table 10. The sorghum grain was obtained as needed at a local elevator, mixed with other ration ingredients at the Animal Husbandry elevator and delivered, usually in 2000 lb. loads to the self feeders when needed.


Improvement Of Beef Cattle Through Breeding Methods, W.H. Smith, J. Akinokun, R.R. Schalles Jan 1968

Improvement Of Beef Cattle Through Breeding Methods, W.H. Smith, J. Akinokun, R.R. Schalles

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two inbred lines of purebred Shorthorn cattle were established and progressively developed, to study production traits and effects of inbreeding. Inbreeding was initiated in the Wernace Premier Line in 1949 and in the Mercury line in 1952. Both lines have remained closed to outside breeding since. Inbreeding has progressively increased as the result of successive generations of half sibbing.


The Value Of An Artery Clamp To Dehorn Cattle, C.L. Drake, R.R. Schalles, C.W. Smith Jan 1968

The Value Of An Artery Clamp To Dehorn Cattle, C.L. Drake, R.R. Schalles, C.W. Smith

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A preliminary trail involving use of an artery clamp and a drawing and description of the clamp are reported in Bulletin 507. This trial involved 42 horned heifers owned and fed by a cooperating feedlot operator. The heifers were individually weighed and placed on these experimental treatments: 1. Control - not dehorned 2. Dehorned using clamp; arteries pulled 3. Dehorned not using clamp; arteries pulled All heifers were placed in one large lot and fed the same ration for 30 days after being dehorned.


The Kansas Beef Cattle Improvement Program, H.W. Westmeyer, K.O. Zoellner Jan 1968

The Kansas Beef Cattle Improvement Program, H.W. Westmeyer, K.O. Zoellner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The Kansas Beef Cattle Improvement Program is to help improve beef cow herds in Kansas and to provide information that will be valuable to producers in selecting breeding animals and making management decisions. The program is not to encourage competition among herds. Environmental conditions vary from herd to herd so competitive among herds cannot be "under the same rules".


Inhibition Of Ruminal Urease, B.E. Brent, A. Adepoju, F. Portela, D. Richardson Jan 1968

Inhibition Of Ruminal Urease, B.E. Brent, A. Adepoju, F. Portela, D. Richardson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Rumen bacteria elaborate an enzyme, urease. Urease is capable of breaking down urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide. Rumen bacteria then incorporate the ammonia into new amino acids and bacterial protein. Thus, urea can be used as a non-nitrogen source for ruminants. Unfortunately, urease often makes ammonia available faster than it can be used by rumen bacteria. That leads to poor utilization of urea or, in extreme cases, to toxicity.


The Effects Of Feeding A High Concentrate Ration Containing 25% Ground Beef Manure To Fattening Heifers In Concrete And Soil-Surfaced Lots, C.L. Drake, L.I. Smart, E.F. Smith, R.I. Lipper Jan 1968

The Effects Of Feeding A High Concentrate Ration Containing 25% Ground Beef Manure To Fattening Heifers In Concrete And Soil-Surfaced Lots, C.L. Drake, L.I. Smart, E.F. Smith, R.I. Lipper

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This is a cooperative project with the Department of Agricultural Engineering to study surface runoff, in addition to animal performance. Twenty Hereford heifers were randomly allotted to four equal sized lots: 2 surfaced with concrete and 2 with soil. Self-feeders in soil-surfaced lots have concrete aprons.


Effects Of Supplementing Corn Silage With Mga And Feeding Varying Levels Of Sorghum Grain To Feed-Lot Heifers, L.I. Smart, C.L. Drake Jan 1968

Effects Of Supplementing Corn Silage With Mga And Feeding Varying Levels Of Sorghum Grain To Feed-Lot Heifers, L.I. Smart, C.L. Drake

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Melengestrol acetate (MGA) 1S a new drug recently approved for use in the supplement portion of rations of feed-lot heifers. The recommended level is from 0.25 to 0.50 mg. per head per day. A 48-hour withdrawal period is required before slaughter. Several experiment stations have shown improved rate of gain, feed utilization and suppressed estrus in feed-lot heifers on high concentrate rations plus MGA.


Corn Vs. Sorghum Grain For Growing-Finishing Pigs, B A. Koch, G Cowman, Robert H. Hines Jan 1968

Corn Vs. Sorghum Grain For Growing-Finishing Pigs, B A. Koch, G Cowman, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Kansas swine growers are quite sure' that corn-fed growing-finishing pigs will outperform those fed sorghum grain. Just as many others feel that sorghum grain is equal to corn in swine rations. Most of the time sorghum grain is lower in price per pound than corn. Research results suggest that corn and sorghum grain are quite similar in chemical composition and in feeding value. Sorghum grain is more variable in crude protein content than corn. One recent comparison between corn and sorghum grain is summarized in this report.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, September 26, 1968


Ddvp (Shell Dichlorvos) For Pregnant Sows, B A. Koch, G L. Cowman, Robert H. Hines Jan 1968

Ddvp (Shell Dichlorvos) For Pregnant Sows, B A. Koch, G L. Cowman, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Recent laboratory and research station reports have indicated that 2,2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate (DDVP) (Shell Dichlorvos) fed to pregnant sows late in gestation may have a favorable effect on the newborn pigs. This study was designed to attempt to measure that effect in terms of increased production or improved efficiency in a commercial herd. The commercial swine herd of Arnold and Bob Rose (Cawker City, Kansas) was used in this study which was financed by the Shell Chemical Company. The Rose herd is one of the larger outstanding commercial pork producing units in Kansas. For all practical purposes it is ...


The Effect Of Aureomycin And Sulmet Combinations In Feed On The Performance Of Cattle, P.A. Phar, P.R. Zimmer Jan 1968

The Effect Of Aureomycin And Sulmet Combinations In Feed On The Performance Of Cattle, P.A. Phar, P.R. Zimmer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two feedlot trials were conducted during the summer of 1967 at the Morris Feed Yards, Marris, Kansas, to study effects of aureomycin (chlortetracycline) and sulfamethazine fed alone or in combination on weight gain, feed efficiency and general health of newly arrived feeder calves.


A Comparison Of All-In-One And Conventional Sorghum Silage With And Without Mga For Feedlot Heifers, L.I. Smart, C.L. Drake Jan 1968

A Comparison Of All-In-One And Conventional Sorghum Silage With And Without Mga For Feedlot Heifers, L.I. Smart, C.L. Drake

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Silage is being utilized in larger quantities in beef cattle growing and fattening rations. Hammes et al. (1964) showed that higher levels of corn silage can be used because gains from high silage and high grain rations are similar. However, more total digestible nutrients may be harvested per acre and the cost of gain is usually less with silage. Several investigators have shown advantages to certain additives with silage.


Animal Protein As A Source Of Unidentified Growth Factors For Swine., B A. Koch, G Cowman, Robert H. Hines Jan 1968

Animal Protein As A Source Of Unidentified Growth Factors For Swine., B A. Koch, G Cowman, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Most authorities agree that the value of a protein source is determined by its content of essential amino acids. On that basis soybean meal compares favorably' with the other commonly fed animal protein sources. However, there is some evidence, especially in the poultry research literature, that certain animal protein sources may contain unidentified growth factors. This report describes a trial in which two different animal proteins were fed at the 5% level in place of soybean meal in growing finishing-swine rations.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, September 26, 1968


Effects Of Varying Sorghum Grain Soybean Meal Ratios And Added Methionine On Swine Gains, Feed Efficiency And Carcass Composition And Quality, Donald H. Kropf, L H. Kasten, B A. Koch, Robert H. Hines Jan 1968

Effects Of Varying Sorghum Grain Soybean Meal Ratios And Added Methionine On Swine Gains, Feed Efficiency And Carcass Composition And Quality, Donald H. Kropf, L H. Kasten, B A. Koch, Robert H. Hines

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Limited work is available on proper protein levels in swine rations when sorghum grain is a major ration component. Remarkable improvement has been made in gaining ability, feed coversion and muscling in swine. Because of continued improvements in these characteristics due to breeding and selection, we need to periodically re-evaluate the requirements for protein and amino acid levels in swine rations. A deterioration in muscle quality' (color, firmness and marbling) seems to be associated with production of lean pork. This prompted a detailed study of muscle quality, carcass composition, feed/gain ratio and gain rate as affected by varying ratios ...


The Influence Of Marbling And Maturity On Beef Tenderness, H.J. Tuma, D. Grant, R. Covington Jan 1968

The Influence Of Marbling And Maturity On Beef Tenderness, H.J. Tuma, D. Grant, R. Covington

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The beef carcass quality grading system currently used has been challenged by many who say current standards are too high and that the amount of marbling to attain a given grade should be decreased.


The Cattle Feeding Industry Of Kansas, P. Phar Jan 1968

The Cattle Feeding Industry Of Kansas, P. Phar

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The Kansas cattle feeding industry has grown tremendously since 1956. The 1968 January Cattle on Feed Report shows more than ten times as many cattle in commercial feedlots as in 1956. Farm feedlots have also increased, but since 1966 over 50 percent of our cattle have been fed in lots with at least 1,000 head capacity.


Comparison Of Time And Method In Freeze-Marking Cattle, R.R. Schalles, C.L. Drake, Dell M. Allen Jan 1968

Comparison Of Time And Method In Freeze-Marking Cattle, R.R. Schalles, C.L. Drake, Dell M. Allen

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Freeze marking for within-herd identification was used on 65 Hereford females. The cattle were 18 months to nearly three years old. Three numerals were placed on the right rump of each animal in the fall of 1967. The "branding irons" used were four-inch brass numerals with a half inch face. Dry ice and ethyl alcohol were used as the coolant with 40, 50 and or 60 seconds of contact time as well as liquid nitrogen with 39, 35 or 40 seconds of contact. Three men each applied one of the three numerals using dry ice and alcohol coolant with 60 ...


Nutritive Value Of Forages As Affected By Soil And Climatic Differences, D. Richardson, F.G. Clary, Evans E. Banbury, C.W. Spaeth, A.B. Erhart, D.W. Arnett, Fred W. Boren, H.B. Perry Jan 1968

Nutritive Value Of Forages As Affected By Soil And Climatic Differences, D. Richardson, F.G. Clary, Evans E. Banbury, C.W. Spaeth, A.B. Erhart, D.W. Arnett, Fred W. Boren, H.B. Perry

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Four previous tests (Kans. Agri. Expt. Sta. Bull. 507:7, 1967) at Colby, Garden City, Manhattan, and Mound Valley, using beef steers from the same herd and feeding the same feedstuffs, grown locally, produced differences in performance. What is the cause(s) of the differences? This test was designed as previous ones, except that all locations used the same feed, which was produced at Garden City. Sorghum silage was dehydrated and pelleted for easier transportation. The calves were wintered on the silage pellets and alfalfa hay. Silage pellets were gradually removed from the ration and sorghum grain added for finishing ...


Urea Vs. Soybean Meal In Wintering And Finishing Rations For Beef Steers, D. Richardson, E.F. Smith, B.E. Brent Jan 1968

Urea Vs. Soybean Meal In Wintering And Finishing Rations For Beef Steers, D. Richardson, E.F. Smith, B.E. Brent

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A previous test using sorghum silage (Kans. Agri. Expt. Sta. Bull. 507:5, 1967) indicated that 3 pounds of grain per day in silage would supply enough available energy for reasonably good utilization of nonprotein nitrogen (urea). However, additional grain apparently increased the utilization of urea. This is the second test to obtain information on the minimum amount of readily available energy as grain necessary for efficient utilization of nonprotein nitrogen as a substitute for natural protein. During the wintering phase, the roughage was corn silage with an average of 38.5% dry matter. Grain made up 27% of the ...