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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Roundup 2020: Agricultural Research Center - Hays Jan 2020

Roundup 2020: Agricultural Research Center - Hays

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Roundup is the major beef cattle education and outreach event sponsored by the Agricultural Research Center - Hays. The 2020 program is the 106th staging of Roundup. The purpose is to communicate timely, applicable research information to producers and extension personnel.


Estimating Annual Forage Yields With Plant Available Water And Growing Season Precipitation, J. Holman, A. Obour, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2020

Estimating Annual Forage Yields With Plant Available Water And Growing Season Precipitation, J. Holman, A. Obour, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Forage production is important for the western Kansas region’s livestock and dairy industries and has become increasingly important as irrigation-well capacity declines. Forages require less water than grain crops and may allow for increased cropping intensity and opportunistic cropping. Being able to estimate forage production is important for determining forage availability versus forage needs. Data from several studies were used to quantify annual forage yield response to plant available water (PAW) at planting and growing season precipitation (GSP). In addition, water use efficiency was quantified. Forages evaluated included winter triticale, spring triticale, and forage sorghum.


Dual Use Of Cover Crops For Forage Production And Soil Health In Dryland Crop Production, A. K. Obour, J. D. Holman, L. M. Simon, S. K. Johnson Jan 2020

Dual Use Of Cover Crops For Forage Production And Soil Health In Dryland Crop Production, A. K. Obour, J. D. Holman, L. M. Simon, S. K. Johnson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Integrating a cover crop (CC) into dryland crop production in the semiarid central Great Plains (CGP) can provide several ecosystem benefits. However, CC adoption is slow and not widely popular in the CGP because CCs utilize water that other­wise would be available for the subsequent cash crop. Grazing or haying CCs can provide economic benefits to offset revenue loss associated with decreased crop yields when CCs are grown ahead of a cash crop. Objectives of the current research were to 1) determine forage production of CC mixtures, and 2) evaluate the impacts of removing CCs for forage on subsequent ...


2019 Kansas Summer Annual Forage Hay And Silage Variety Trial, J. D. Holman, A. K. Obour, J. Lingenfelser, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2020

2019 Kansas Summer Annual Forage Hay And Silage Variety Trial, J. D. Holman, A. K. Obour, J. Lingenfelser, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 2019, summer annual forage variety trials were conducted across Kansas near Garden City, Hays, and Scandia. All sites evaluated hay and silage entries. Companies were able to enter varieties into any possible combinations of research sites, so not all sites had all varieties. Across the sites, a total of 95 hay varieties, 99 sorghum silage varieties, and 12 corn silage varieties were evaluated.


Determining Profitable Forage Rotations, J. Holman, A. Obour, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2019

Determining Profitable Forage Rotations, J. Holman, A. Obour, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Annual forages are an important crop in the High Plains, yet the region lacks recommended annual forage rotations compared to those developed for grain crops. Forages are important for the region’s livestock and dairy industries and are becoming increasingly important as irrigation capacity and grain prices decrease. Forages require less water than grain crops and may allow for increased cropping system intensity and op-opportunistic cropping. A study was initiated in 2012 at the Southwest Research-Extension Center near Garden City, KS, comparing several 1-, 3-, and 4-year forage rotations with no-tillage and minimum-tillage. Data presented are from 2013 through 2018 ...


Integrated Grain And Forage Rotations, J. Holman, A. Obour, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2019

Integrated Grain And Forage Rotations, J. Holman, A. Obour, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Forage production is important for the western Kansas region’s livestock and dairy industries and has become increasingly important as irrigation-well capacity declines. Forages require less water than grain crops and may allow for increased cropping intensity and opportunistic cropping. Being able to estimate forage production is important for determining forage availability versus forage needs. Data from several studies were used to quantify annual forage yield response to plant available water (PAW) at planting and growing season precipitation (GSP). In addition, water use efficiency was quantified. Forages evaluated included winter triticale, spring triticale, and forage sorghum. Preliminary results showed PAW ...


Cattle Preference For Annual Forages, J. K. Farney Jan 2019

Cattle Preference For Annual Forages, J. K. Farney

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Many plant species that are available to use as cover crops also have potential as for­age for cattle. With this array of options it can be daunting to decide which plants to establish to meet goals as either a cover crop, forage, or for both. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the annual forages fed to cattle in the fall, winter, or sum­mer that cattle preferred. To summarize, grasses were the most highly preferred forage for cattle regardless of grazing period. Low glucosinolate brassicas such as ‘Graza’ forage radish was the most highly preferred brassica ...


2018 Kansas Summer Annual Forage Hay And Silage Variety Trial, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, A. Esser, Jane Lingenfelser, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2019

2018 Kansas Summer Annual Forage Hay And Silage Variety Trial, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, A. Esser, Jane Lingenfelser, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 2018, summer annual forage variety trials were conducted across Kansas near Garden City, Hays, and Scandia. All sites evaluated hay and silage entries. Companies were able to enter varieties into any possible combinations of research sites, so not all sites had all varieties. Across the sites, a total of 77 hay varieties and 87 silage varieties were evaluated.


Evaluating Teff Grass As A Summer Forage, J. M. Davidson, D. Min, R. M. Aiken, G. J. Kluitenberg Jan 2018

Evaluating Teff Grass As A Summer Forage, J. M. Davidson, D. Min, R. M. Aiken, G. J. Kluitenberg

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The objectives of this study were to determine the forage yield, nutritive value, and water use efficiency of teff grass (Eragrostis tef) under field conditions as compared to sorghum sudangrass and forage pearl millet. Water use efficiency was determined by regressing above-ground biomass on crop water use between sampling periods. Yield was determined by quadrat area clippings of above-ground biomass. Nutritive value was determined using wet chemical analysis. Cultivars showed significant differences in biomass production at all sampling dates in both years. Teff grass demonstrated potential to provide producers with a fast-growing and competitive forage crop by reaching optimum yields ...


Integrated Grain And Forage Rotations, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2018

Integrated Grain And Forage Rotations, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Interest in growing forages and reducing fallow has necessitated research on soil, water, and crop yields in intensified grain/forage rotations. Fallow stores moisture, which helps stabilize crop yields and reduces the risk of crop failure; however, only 25 to 30% of the precipitation received during the fallow period of a no-till wheat-sorghum-fallow rotation is stored. . The remaining 75 to 70% precipitation is lost, primarily due to evaporation. Moisture storage in fallow is more efficient earlier in the fallow period, when the soil is dry, and during the winter months when the evaporation rate is lower. It may be possible ...


Forage Type And Maturity Effects On Yield And Nutritive Value, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2018

Forage Type And Maturity Effects On Yield And Nutritive Value, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Forage sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) and sorghum × sudan (Sorghum bicolor sssp. Drummondii) are important annual forages in the High Plains. Advancements in brown mid-rib (BMR) cultivars will likely affect forage yield and nutritive values. A study was initiated in 2017 at the Southwest Research-Extension Center near Garden City, KS, comparing one variety each of BMR and non-BMR forage sorghum and sorghum × sudan cultivars. Forage type and growth stage affected yield and nutritive value, and occasionally there was an interaction between forage type and maturity.


Forage Report 2015, J. D. Holman, Jane Lingenfelser, A. Obour, A. Esser, J. L. Moyer, G. Cramer, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2017

Forage Report 2015, J. D. Holman, Jane Lingenfelser, A. Obour, A. Esser, J. L. Moyer, G. Cramer, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 2015 summer annual forage variety trials were conducted across Kansas near Garden City, Hays, Hutchinson, Mound Valley, and Scandia. All sites evaluated hay and silage entries, except Hutchinson, which only evaluated hay entries. Companies were able to enter varieties into any possible combinations of research sites, so not all sites had all varieties. Across the sites, a total of 30 hay varieties and 22 silage varieties were evaluated.


Forage Report 2016, J. D. Holman, G. Cramer, A. Esser, Jane Lingenfelser, S. Maxwell, J. L. Moyer, A. Obour, T. Roberts Jan 2017

Forage Report 2016, J. D. Holman, G. Cramer, A. Esser, Jane Lingenfelser, S. Maxwell, J. L. Moyer, A. Obour, T. Roberts

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 2016 summer annual forage variety trials were conducted across Kansas near Garden City, Hays, Hutchinson, Mound Valley, and Scandia. All sites evaluated hay and silage entries. Companies were able to enter varieties into any possible combinations of research sites, so not all sites had all varieties. Across the sites, a total of 99 hay varieties and 99 silage varieties were evaluated.


Searc Agricultural Research 2017, L. W. Lomas Jan 2017

Searc Agricultural Research 2017, L. W. Lomas

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Southeast Agricultural Research Center, Agricultural Research 2017. Topics include grazing and supplemental feed for beef cattle, forage, pasture, hay, grasses, legumes, tillage, fertilizer, corn, soybeans, wheat, and soil health and variability.


Integrated Grain And Forage Rotations, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2017

Integrated Grain And Forage Rotations, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Producers are interested in growing forages in rotation with grain crops. Many producers are interested in diversifying their operations to include livestock or grow feed for the livestock industry. By integrating forages into the cropping system producers can take advantage of more markets and reduce market risk. Forages require less water to make a crop than grain crops, so the potential may exist to reduce fallow by including forages in the crop rotation. Reducing fallow through intensified grain/forage rotations may increase the profitability and sustainability compared to existing crop rotations.

This study was started in 2013, with crops grown ...


Estimating Annual Forage Yields With Plant Available Water And Growing Season Precipitation, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, I. Kisekka, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2017

Estimating Annual Forage Yields With Plant Available Water And Growing Season Precipitation, J. D. Holman, A. Obour, I. Kisekka, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Forage production is important for western Kansas region’s livestock and dairy industries and has become increasingly important as irrigation-well capacity declines. Forages require less water than grain crops and may allow for increased cropping intensity and opportunistic cropping. Being able to estimate forage production is important for determining forage availability versus forage needs. Data from several studies were used to quantify annual forage yield response to plant available water (PAW) at planting and growing season precipitation (GSP). In addition, water use efficiency was quantified. Forages evaluated included winter triticale, spring triticale, and forage sorghum.


Forage Report 2016, J. D. Holman, G. Cramer, A. Esser, Jane Lingenfelser, S. Maxwell, J. L. Moyer, A. Obour, T. Roberts Jan 2017

Forage Report 2016, J. D. Holman, G. Cramer, A. Esser, Jane Lingenfelser, S. Maxwell, J. L. Moyer, A. Obour, T. Roberts

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 2016 summer annual forage variety trials were conducted across Kansas near Garden City, Hays, Hutchinson, Mound Valley, and Scandia. All sites evaluated hay and silage entries. Companies were able to enter varieties into any possible combinations of research sites, so not all sites had all varieties. Across the sites, a total of 99 hay varieties and 99 silage varieties were evaluated.


Evaluating Multispecies Cover Crops For Forage Production, C. Davis, D. Presley, J. K. Farney, G. F. Sassenrath Jan 2015

Evaluating Multispecies Cover Crops For Forage Production, C. Davis, D. Presley, J. K. Farney, G. F. Sassenrath

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Cover crops offer potential benefits for improving soil health, but establishment and management costs can be expensive. One way for farmers to recover these costs is to graze the forage, which benefits producers by integrating crop and animal production. More information is needed on the potential forage quantity and quality for grazing livestock of cover crops and mixed species of cover crops. Researchers have suggested that different plant species complement each other, but additional work is needed to determine how best to balance forage production and how competitive the various species are when added to a mix. Sixteen treatments were ...


Determining Profitable Annual Forage Rotations, J. D. Holman, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2015

Determining Profitable Annual Forage Rotations, J. D. Holman, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Producers are interested in growing forages, yet the southwest region of Kansas lacks proven recommended crop rotations such as those for grain crops. Forage production is important to the region’s livestock and dairy industries and is becoming increasingly important as irrigation well capacity declines. Forages require less water than grain crops and may allow for increased cropping intensity and opportunistic cropping. A study was initiated in 2013 comparing several 1-, 3-, and 4-year forage rotations with no-till and minimum-till (min-till). Data presented are from 2013 through 2014. Winter triticale yields were not affected by tillage in 2013 but were ...


1989 Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, L. W. Lomas, K. P. Coffey, J. L. Moyer, D. W. Sweeney, G. V. Granade, T. Walter, K. W. Kelley Jan 1989

1989 Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, L. W. Lomas, K. P. Coffey, J. L. Moyer, D. W. Sweeney, G. V. Granade, T. Walter, K. W. Kelley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Research on beef cattle and crops at Southeast Kansas Branch Station.


1988 Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, K. P. Coffey, J. L. Moyer, L. W. Lomas, D. W. Sweeney, G. V. Granade, T. Walter, K. W. Kelley Jan 1988

1988 Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, K. P. Coffey, J. L. Moyer, L. W. Lomas, D. W. Sweeney, G. V. Granade, T. Walter, K. W. Kelley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Research on beef cattle, crops, and related topics at Southeast Kansas Branch Station.


1987 Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, L. W. Lomas, K. W. Kelley, J. L. Moyer, D. W. Sweeney Jan 1987

1987 Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, L. W. Lomas, K. W. Kelley, J. L. Moyer, D. W. Sweeney

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Research on beef cattle and crops at Southeast Kansas Branch Station.


1986 Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, L. W. Lomas, K. W. Kelley, G. M. Paulsen, J. L. Moyer, D. W. Sweeney Jan 1986

1986 Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, L. W. Lomas, K. W. Kelley, G. M. Paulsen, J. L. Moyer, D. W. Sweeney

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Research on crops, beef cattle, and related topics at the Southeast Kansas Branch Station.


1985 Report Of Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, L. W. Lomas, K. W. Kelley, G. V. Granade, J. L. Moyer, D. W. Sweeney Jan 1985

1985 Report Of Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, L. W. Lomas, K. W. Kelley, G. V. Granade, J. L. Moyer, D. W. Sweeney

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Through annual research reports, the Southeast Kansas Branch Experiment Station attempts to keep the area's consumers and producers of agricultural products informed on the Station's research accomplishments. In serving the area, we conduct research at fields located at Parsons, site of the headquarters; at Mound Valley, the original location of the Branch Station; and at Columbus, which has been in the Kansas State University research system for over 60 years. This report for 1984 covers five areas of research emphasis: Beef Cattle, Crops, Forages, Soil and Water Management, and Crop Varietal Development. We sincerely hope that it will ...


1984 Report Of Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, R. W. Dougherty, K. W. Kelley, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer, D. W. Sweeney Jan 1984

1984 Report Of Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, R. W. Dougherty, K. W. Kelley, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer, D. W. Sweeney

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Through annual research reports the Southeast Kansas Branch Experiment Station attempts to keep the area's consumers and producers of agricultural products informed on the Station's research accomplishments. In serving the area, we conduct research at fields located at Parsons, site of headquarters; at Mound Valley, the original. location of the Branch Station; and at Columbus, which has been in the Kansas State University research system for over 60 years. This report for 1983 covers five areas of research emphasis: Beef Cattle, Crops, Forages, Soil and Water Management, and Crop Varietal Development. We sincerely hope that it will be ...


1983 Report Of Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, K. W. Kelley, J. L. Moyer, L. W. Lomas Jan 1983

1983 Report Of Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, K. W. Kelley, J. L. Moyer, L. W. Lomas

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Through annual research reports the Southeast Kansas Branch Experiment Station attempts to keep the area's consumers and producers of agricultural products informed on the Station's research accomplishments. In serving the area, we conduct research at fields located at Parsons, site of headquarters; at Mound Valley, the original location of the Branch Station; and at Columbus, which has been in the Kansas State University research system for 60 years. This report for 1982 covers three areas of research emphasis: Crops, Forages, and Beef Cattle. We sincerely hope that it will be useful to area producers and consumers, industry cooperators ...


1982 Report Of Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, R. E. Lamond, J. L. Moyer, K. W. Kelley, L. W. Lomas Jan 1982

1982 Report Of Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, R. E. Lamond, J. L. Moyer, K. W. Kelley, L. W. Lomas

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Through annual research reports the Southeast Kansas Branch Experiment Station attempts to keep the area's consumers and producers of agricultural products informed on the Station's research accomplishments. In serving the area, we conduct research at fields located at Parsons, site of the headquarters; at Mound Valley, the original location of the Branch Station; and at Columbus, which has been in the Kansas State University research system for nearly 60 years. This report for 1981 covers four areas of research emphasis: Soil and Water Management, Forages, Crops, and Beef Cattle. We sincerely hope that it will be useful to ...


1981 Report Of Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, K. W. Kelley, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer, R. E. Lamond Jan 1981

1981 Report Of Agricultural Research, Southeast Kansas Branch Station, K. W. Kelley, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer, R. E. Lamond

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This annual research report is to inform area farmers of what is being attempted and accomplished at the Southeast Kansas Branch Experiment Station to serve the area. During 1980 the Station headquarters was moved from Mound Valley to Parsons, the location of one of the units of the Station since 1967. Effort at the Mound Valley location continues without reduction. The third unit of the Station is near Columbus. This report covers four areas of research emphasis: crops, forages, beef cattle, and soil and water management. The information is intended for producers, industry cooperators, and other interested persons.


1979 Research Results Southeast Kansas Branch Agricultural Experiment Station, K. W. Kelley, R. J. Johnson, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer, R. E. Lamond Jan 1980

1979 Research Results Southeast Kansas Branch Agricultural Experiment Station, K. W. Kelley, R. J. Johnson, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer, R. E. Lamond

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Southeast Kansas Experiment Station is in its 30th year of operation. The emphasis has changed over this period to reflect changes in agricultural emphases of the area. The professional research staff consists of four scientists, each with a broad area of research responsibility. Together they emphasize improvement in crop production, forage production, beef cattle production and soil and water management.