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Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

2001

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Articles 1 - 30 of 84

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Impact Of Dairy Manure Addition On Soil Nutrients In Northeast And South Central Kansas, T. Strahm, Joseph P. Harner, James P. Murphy, G. Mccormack Jan 2001

Impact Of Dairy Manure Addition On Soil Nutrients In Northeast And South Central Kansas, T. Strahm, Joseph P. Harner, James P. Murphy, G. Mccormack

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sixty four percent of the fields (14 of 22) in northeast and south central Kansas would be able to apply dairy manure on a nitrogen basis if the current swine manure application regulations were adopted. Due to high phosphorus levels in some fields, two of the 11 fields in northeast Kansas could not have any manure applied to them. Two other fields in northeast and four fields in south central Kansas would have to limit manure application rates to annual phosphorus required by the crops. Our results indicate minimal accumulation of nitrogen and potassium in the soil profile.; Dairy Day ...


Extralabel Mastitis Theraphy: What Does It Mean?, J.R. Roberson Jan 2001

Extralabel Mastitis Theraphy: What Does It Mean?, J.R. Roberson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Extra-label drug use (ELDU) is needed to provide optimal therapy for ill dairy cattle. Proper ELDU requires cooperation and compliance between the veterinarian and producer to ensure that proper drug withdrawal times are observed.; Dairy Day, 2001, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2001;


Fertility After Synchronization Of Estrus In Dairy Heifers Using Gnrh, Pgf2Α, And Progesterone (Cidr), A.M. Richardson, B.A. Hensley, Jeffrey S. Stevenson Jan 2001

Fertility After Synchronization Of Estrus In Dairy Heifers Using Gnrh, Pgf2Α, And Progesterone (Cidr), A.M. Richardson, B.A. Hensley, Jeffrey S. Stevenson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Our objective was to determine fertility of heifers after synchronization of estrus using PGF2", preceded by progesterone, GnRH, or both. Dairy heifers (n = 246) were assigned randomly to three treatments: 1) 50 :g of GnRH given 6 d before 25 mg of PGF2 (d "“1) plus a used intravaginal progesteronereleasing insert (CIDR-B; d "“7 to 0; CIDR+GnRH); 2) same as CIDR+GnRH without the GnRH (CIDR); and 3) same as CIDR+GnRH without the used CIDR (GnRH). All heifers were fitted with Heat- Watch® patches and characteristics of estrus examined before AI included duration of estrus, number of standing ...


Presynchronization Of Estrous Cycles In Dairy Cows Before Ovsynch + Cidr And Resynchronization Of Repeat Estrus Using The Cidr, S.Z. El-Zarkouny, J.A. Cartmill, A.M. Richardson, M.A. Medina-Britos Jan 2001

Presynchronization Of Estrous Cycles In Dairy Cows Before Ovsynch + Cidr And Resynchronization Of Repeat Estrus Using The Cidr, S.Z. El-Zarkouny, J.A. Cartmill, A.M. Richardson, M.A. Medina-Britos

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Postpartum anestrus is one of the major limitations to achieving acceptable pregnancy rates. The Ovsynch protocol is an excellent tool to improve reproductive efficiency of dairy cows because it can induce estrous cycles in anestrous cows. In the first experiment, administering two PGF2" injections to lactating dairy cows 14 days apart with the second injection given 12 days before the Ovsynch protocol increased (P<0.05) pregnancy rate by 10 percentage points in cycling and noncycling cows. Inserting a progesterone-releasing insert (CIDR) for 7 days during the Ovsynch protocol did not further increase pregnancy rates. In a second experiment, a resynchronization treatment consisting of a used CIDR inserted for 7 days from days 13 to 20 after insemination increased (P<0.05) embryo survival from day 30 to 58 by 11 percentage points but failed to increase overall rate of return to estrus and conception rate at the second AI (first eligible estrus after first AI).; Dairy Day, 2001, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2001;


Management Of Natural Service Bulls On Large Dairies, P.J. Chenoweth, John F. Smith Jan 2001

Management Of Natural Service Bulls On Large Dairies, P.J. Chenoweth, John F. Smith

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Natural service (NS) bulls are widely used on large dairy farms despite the wellproven genetic progress achievable through AI. Producers may choose to use NS bulls for a variety of reasons that are discussed below. In this presentation, problems encountered with the use of NS bulls on a large dairy in Kansas are described in relation to reduced reproductive performance on that dairy. Lameness in bulls was considered to be a major contributing factor to reduced herd reproductive performance, with seminal vesiculitis also possibly playing a role. Possible contributing factors for the occurrence of these problems in the bull population ...


Effect Of Fan Placement On Milk Production And Dry Matter Intake Of Lactating Dairy Cows Housed In A 4-Row Freestall Barn, John F. Smith, Joseph P. Harner, S.E. Defrain, Michael J. Brouk Jan 2001

Effect Of Fan Placement On Milk Production And Dry Matter Intake Of Lactating Dairy Cows Housed In A 4-Row Freestall Barn, John F. Smith, Joseph P. Harner, S.E. Defrain, Michael J. Brouk

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Heat stress reduces milk production, feed intake, and reproductive efficiency each summer in Kansas. Without heat abatement procedures, milk production may decline 20- 30% during the summer months. Research has shown that supplemental fan cooling in combination with low pressure feedline sprinklers can reduce the effects of heat stress on milk production and feed intake. One critical issue in heat stress abatement is the location of fans in a 4-row freestall barn. Research conducted during the summer of 2000 on a northeast Kansas dairy found that locating fans over both the feedline and head-to-head freestalls increased milk production 5.8 ...


Effects Of A Biological Additive And Sealing Technique On The Aerobic Stability Of Whole-Plant Corn Silage, M.E. Uriarte, K.K. Bolson, Ronald V. Pope Jan 2001

Effects Of A Biological Additive And Sealing Technique On The Aerobic Stability Of Whole-Plant Corn Silage, M.E. Uriarte, K.K. Bolson, Ronald V. Pope

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The objectives of this whole-plant corn study were to determine the effects of a biological additive and sealing technique on yeast and mold populations; and to examine the relationship between the microbial and chemical changes in the silages during exposure to air. Whole-plant corn was harvested at 80% milkline (36% DM), and ensiled at a density of 43 lb of fresh matter/ft3. One-half of the pre-ensiled forage was treated with a biological additive (A), which contained a mixture of bacteria and enzymes (supplied by Alltech, Inc., Nicholasville, KY); the other one-half of the pre-ensiled forage was the untreated control ...


Performance Of Holstein Cows Fed Wet Corn Gluten Feed Or Soyhull-Steep Liquor Pellets During Early Lactation, E.E. Ferdinand, Evan C. Titgemeyer, A.F. Park, J.M. Defrain Jan 2001

Performance Of Holstein Cows Fed Wet Corn Gluten Feed Or Soyhull-Steep Liquor Pellets During Early Lactation, E.E. Ferdinand, Evan C. Titgemeyer, A.F. Park, J.M. Defrain

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Wet corn gluten feed and soyhull-steep liquor pellets tended to increase dry matter intake and milk yield. Combining condensed corn steep liquor with raw soybean hulls provides a convenient source of digestible fiber and rumen degradable protein.; Dairy Day, 2001, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2001;


Field Day 2001, Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station And Cooperative Extension Service Jan 2001

Field Day 2001, Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station And Cooperative Extension Service

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Each Field Day report consists of individual research reports on topics specific to the region, including cultural methods for most of the major crops grown in Kansas, mitigating the effects of weeds, insects, and disease associated with those crops, and irrigation. Research is conducted and reports written by staff of the K-State Research and Extension Southwest Research Extension Center.


Field Research 2001, Dale L. Fjell Jan 2001

Field Research 2001, Dale L. Fjell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

No abstract provided.


2001 Agricultural Research Southeast Agricultural Research Center, Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station And Cooperative Extension Service Jan 2001

2001 Agricultural Research Southeast Agricultural Research Center, Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station And Cooperative Extension Service

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

No abstract provided.


Evaluation Of Different Copper Sources As A Growth Promoter In Swine Finishing Diets, C W. Hastad, Jim L. Nelssen, Michael D. Tokach, Robert D. Goodband, Steven S. Dritz Jan 2001

Evaluation Of Different Copper Sources As A Growth Promoter In Swine Finishing Diets, C W. Hastad, Jim L. Nelssen, Michael D. Tokach, Robert D. Goodband, Steven S. Dritz

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of added copper from copper sulfate or copper chloride on performance of growing-finishing pigs. A total of 2,277 pigs with an initial weight of 71.6 lb were used in a commercial research facility in southwest Minnesota. Adding copper to the diet improved performance during the first two weeks in the finishing barn regardless of copper source or level. The results of these experiments indicate that low levels of copper chloride or copper sulfate (50 to 100 ppm) can be an effective and economical growth promoter when fed for the first ...


Tenderness And Cooking Characteristics Of Beef Cooked By Electric Belt Grill, Forced-Air Convection Oven, Or Electric Broiler, T.E. Lawrence, D.A. King, E. Obuz, E.J. Yancey, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 2001

Tenderness And Cooking Characteristics Of Beef Cooked By Electric Belt Grill, Forced-Air Convection Oven, Or Electric Broiler, T.E. Lawrence, D.A. King, E. Obuz, E.J. Yancey, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We used an electric belt grill, a forced-air convection oven, and an electric broiler to cook 170 bottom round, 142 brisket, 177 top sirloin, 176 strip loin, and 136 eye of round steaks from USDA Select carcasses to determine the effects of cooking method and muscle on shear force values, cooking traits, and repeatability of duplicate measurements. All cooking treatments allowed differences to be detected (P<0.05) in Warner-Bratzler shear force, although the differences were inconsistent. Shear force values of strip steaks and eye of round steaks were similar across cooking treatments; however, shear force values of bottom round, brisket, and top sirloin steaks were different (P<0.05) among cooking treatments. Based on poor repeatability, shear force values for top sirloin steaks appear unreliable. Poor repeatability for shear force values from steaks cooked by the forced-air convection oven are a result of drastic temperature changes that occur when the doors are opened to remove steaks. We do not recommend using a forced-air convection oven to test treatment effects on shear force values when cooking multiple steaks simultaneously. Belt grill cooking resulted in the highest shear force repeatability R = 0.07 to 0.89) of strip steaks. Electric broiling resulted in acceptable R = 0.60) repeatability of shear force measurements for all classes of steaks. The electric broiler and electric belt grill are both satisfactory cooking methods when measuring shear force of bottom round, brisket, strip loin, and eye of round steaks.


Genetic Relationships Among Breeding Soundness Traits In Yearling Bulls, R.A. Christmas, M.F. Spire, J.M. Sargeant, Sharon K. Tucker, Daniel W. Moser Jan 2001

Genetic Relationships Among Breeding Soundness Traits In Yearling Bulls, R.A. Christmas, M.F. Spire, J.M. Sargeant, Sharon K. Tucker, Daniel W. Moser

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Breeding soundness examination data on over 1,200 yearling Angus bulls were analyzed to determine heritability of and genetic relationships among breeding soundness traits. Breeding soundness exam procedures were consistent with those currently recommended by the Society of Theriogenology. Presence of seminal white blood cells (an indicator of seminal vesiculitis), penile warts and persistent frenulums were noted and recorded. Data were adjusted for age at measurement and contemporary group effects. Heritability was high for scrotal circumference, moderate for percentage of abnormalities, low for sperm motility, and near zero for semen white blood cells, persistent frenulum, and penile warts. Genetic correlations ...


Carcass Merit Project: Development Of Epds And Genetic Marker Validation, E.J. Pollak, R.D. Green, J. Taylor, S. Davis, T. Holm, S. Koontz, C. Gill, Daniel W. Moser, E.A. Westcott, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 2001

Carcass Merit Project: Development Of Epds And Genetic Marker Validation, E.J. Pollak, R.D. Green, J. Taylor, S. Davis, T. Holm, S. Koontz, C. Gill, Daniel W. Moser, E.A. Westcott, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Carcass and Warner-Bratzler shear force data on strip loin steaks have been obtained on over 4,200 cattle from contemporary progeny groups from the most widely used sires in 15 beef cattle breed associations (16 breeds). Trained sensory panel evaluations have been conducted on over 1,500 strip loin steaks from a sample of contemporary progeny groups from sires included in the QTL (quantitative trait loci) validation component of the project. One breed association has published Warner-Bratzler shear force Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs) for 57 sires of two breeds. DNA analyses and screening have been completed for 11 QTL on ...


Carcass Merit Traits: Development Of Epds For Warner-Bratzler Shear Force And Dna Marker Validation, E.J. Pollak, R.J. Lipsey, E.A. Westcott, Michael E. Dikeman, Sally L. Stroda Jan 2001

Carcass Merit Traits: Development Of Epds For Warner-Bratzler Shear Force And Dna Marker Validation, E.J. Pollak, R.J. Lipsey, E.A. Westcott, Michael E. Dikeman, Sally L. Stroda

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Warner-Bratzler shear force data on strip loin steaks were obtained on 761 steers from contemporary groups of progeny from the most popular 38 Simmental sires, and 133 steers from nine Simbrah sires. The range for Warner-Bratzler shear force EPDs for the Simmental sires was from -0.51 lb (more tender) to +0.48 lb (less tender). The range in EPDs for the Simbrah sires was from -0.73 to +0.73 lb. In addition, DNA analyses and screening have been completed for 11 quantitative trait loci on several Simmental and Simbrah sires. Information from this project should allow cattle producers ...


Influences Of Aging On Tenderness And Color Of Beef Steaks, R.R. Timm, K.A. Hachmeister, L.M. Sammel, A.E. Rasor, John A. Unruh, Sally L. Stroda Jan 2001

Influences Of Aging On Tenderness And Color Of Beef Steaks, R.R. Timm, K.A. Hachmeister, L.M. Sammel, A.E. Rasor, John A. Unruh, Sally L. Stroda

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Aging loin strip, bottom, and eye of round steaks for 21 days decreased Warner- Bratzler Shear (WBS) values (increased tenderness). For the top round, aged semimembranosus muscle steaks tended to have lower WBS values (more tender) than nonaged steaks, while aged adductor steaks were similar to non-aged steaks. Furthermore, instrumental L* color values were higher (lighter) for aged strip and eye of round steaks than non-aged steaks, and instrumental a* color values were higher (redder) for aged bottom round, eye of round, and top round (semimembranosus) steaks than nonaged steaks. Aging steaks is effective for improving tenderness and color of ...


Rumensin®-Tylan® Combinations In Limit-Fed Growing Diets: Effects On Growing And Finishing Performance And Carcass Characteristics, Sean P. Montgomery, T.B. Farran, J.J. Sindt, C.M. Coetzer, J.N. Pike, A.M. Trater, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, S.B. Laudert, James S. Drouillard Jan 2001

Rumensin®-Tylan® Combinations In Limit-Fed Growing Diets: Effects On Growing And Finishing Performance And Carcass Characteristics, Sean P. Montgomery, T.B. Farran, J.J. Sindt, C.M. Coetzer, J.N. Pike, A.M. Trater, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, S.B. Laudert, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Five hundred seventy-two crossbred beef heifers were used to compare gain and feed efficiency of cattle consuming restricted quantities of energy-dense growing diets containing varying concentrations of Rumensin® and Tylan®. Growing treatments consisted of providing Rumensin at 30 grams per ton of dry matter (R30), or 250 mg per head per day (R250). A third treatment consisted of a Rumensin/Tylan combination, providing 250 and 90 mg per head per day of Rumensin and Tylan, respectively (R250/T90). Average daily gain and feed efficiency during the growing phase were not different (P>0.90) among treatments. Heifers that received R250 ...


Soybean Hulls And Alfalfa For Limit-Fed Cattle, A.M. Trater, C.A. Löest, B.D. Lambert, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 2001

Soybean Hulls And Alfalfa For Limit-Fed Cattle, A.M. Trater, C.A. Löest, B.D. Lambert, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We evaluated the optimal level of alfalfa inclusion in limit-fed, soybean hull-based diets. Steers were fed soybean hull-based diets containing 0 to 30% alfalfa or alfalfa alone. Feed intakes were lower for alfalfa than for soybean hull-based diets. Digestibilities of dry matter and neutral detergent fiber were lower (P<0.05) for alfalfa than for diets containing soybean hulls. Dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibilities were similar for different levels of alfalfa in diets containing soybean hulls, although there were positive associative effects between soybean hulls and alfalfa. Rates of liquid passage from the rumen were higher for alfalfa than for soybean hull-containing diets, and increased as alfalfa was added to the soybean hull diets. Solid passage rates also increased with increasing amounts of alfalfa in soybean hull-containing diets. Adding 30% alfalfa to primarily soybean hull diets led to positive associative effects on diet digestibility, but alfalfa additions increased liquid and solid passage rates, suggesting that the benefit was not a result of slower passage of soybean hulls from the rumen.


Effects Of Wet Corn Gluten Feed And Intake Level On Diet Digestibility And Rumen Passage Rate In Steers, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, N.J. Pike, C.M. Coetzer, A.M. Trater, James J. Higgins, James S. Drouillard, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 2001

Effects Of Wet Corn Gluten Feed And Intake Level On Diet Digestibility And Rumen Passage Rate In Steers, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, N.J. Pike, C.M. Coetzer, A.M. Trater, James J. Higgins, James S. Drouillard, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Including 40% wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) in the diet increased total tract digestion of organic matter and neutral detergent fiber (P<0.01), reduced total volatile fatty acid concentration (P<0.01), increased rumen NH3 concentration (P<0.01), increased rumen pH, and tended (P<0.06) to increase total tract digestion of starch. Furthermore, WCGF increased rumen passage rate of solid digesta (P<0.01) compared to diets containing no WCGF. Limit feeding reduced total tract digestion of organic matter and neutral detergent fiber (P<0.01), decreased total volatile fatty acid concentration (P<0.01), increased rumen NH3 concentration (P<.01), increased rumen pH at 0 and 12 hours after feeding, reduced rumen pH at 4 hours after feeding, and increased rumen liquid passage rate (P<0.02).


Interrelationships Among Carcass Characteristics Of Feedlot Steers And Heifers Selected For Competition, D.A. King, T.E. Lawrence, D.E. Schafer, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 2001

Interrelationships Among Carcass Characteristics Of Feedlot Steers And Heifers Selected For Competition, D.A. King, T.E. Lawrence, D.E. Schafer, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We evaluated the interrelationships among carcass characteristics of steers and heifers selected from commercial feedlots for competition in the Beef Empire Days live and carcass contests. Because judging criteria are weighted heavily on cutability, the majority of cattle entered were trim and muscular. Within this highly selected group, heifer carcasses had larger ribeye areas, lower hot carcass weights, more ribeye area/100 lbs. of hot carcass weight, and a higher percentage of kidney-pelvic-heart fat than steers. However, steers graded USDA Choice or better 4% more often than heifers. Ribeye area, ribeye area/100 lbs. of hot carcass weight, and percentage ...


A Survey Of Phytoestrogenic Activity In Kansas Flint Hills Pastures, S.I. Paisley, W.V. Welshons, G.E. Rottinghaus, Jeffrey L. Davidson, James J. Higgins, Dale A. Blasi, Michael S. Holder, David E. Kehler Jan 2001

A Survey Of Phytoestrogenic Activity In Kansas Flint Hills Pastures, S.I. Paisley, W.V. Welshons, G.E. Rottinghaus, Jeffrey L. Davidson, James J. Higgins, Dale A. Blasi, Michael S. Holder, David E. Kehler

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The botanical composition and basal cover of three Kansas Flint Hills pastures located in Butler and Chase counties was surveyed to estimate the incidence of plant species that contain appreciable levels of estrogenic activity. Many-flowered scurfpea and Ladino clover were the only plant species classified as high in estrogenic activity. Although significant estrogenic activity existed in specific species, the willingness of livestock to consume those species is unclear.


Motivation Factors For Beef Processor-Producer Linkages, J.D. Lawrence, M.L. Hayenga, Ted C. Schroeder Jan 2001

Motivation Factors For Beef Processor-Producer Linkages, J.D. Lawrence, M.L. Hayenga, Ted C. Schroeder

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A survey was conducted of the 15 largest beef processors to identify the mix of procurement practices being used and to understand reasons motivating recent processorproducer linkages. Processors are shifting away from cash-market live, fed-cattle trade, which represents only 36% of cattle procured by survey respondents in 1999. Processorowned cattle feeding represents only approximately 5%, where it has been for more than a decade. Various other forms of pricing such as carcass weight, grid, and formula represented the largest portion of purchases at 49%. Processors indicated the two most important reasons they get involved in contracts and marketing agreements with ...


Factors Affecting Beef Demand, J. Mintert, Ted C. Schroeder, T. Marsh Jan 2001

Factors Affecting Beef Demand, J. Mintert, Ted C. Schroeder, T. Marsh

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We investigated factors that have affected beef demand over the last two decades. Beef demand is typically modeled as a function of beef prices, competing meat prices, prices of all other goods, and consumer expenditures. Our comprehensive model also investigated the impact on beef demand of food safety issues, health concerns, and changes in consumer lifestyle and demographics. Results from this analysis help explain changes in beef demand that occurred during the 1980s and 1990s. First, consumer concerns about food safety, as measured by increases in beef recalls, had a negative impact on beef demand over the last two decades ...


Resynchronization Of Estrus With Progesterone And Estrogen In Previously Inseminated Beef Cows, M.A. Medina-Britos, A.M. Richardson, G.C. Lamb, B.A. Hensley, T.J. Marple, Jeffrey S. Stevenson, Sandra K. Johnson Jan 2001

Resynchronization Of Estrus With Progesterone And Estrogen In Previously Inseminated Beef Cows, M.A. Medina-Britos, A.M. Richardson, G.C. Lamb, B.A. Hensley, T.J. Marple, Jeffrey S. Stevenson, Sandra K. Johnson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A study was conducted in 609 beef cows to determine whether or not estrus might be resynchronized in previously inseminated beef cows to accommodate a second artificial insemination (AI) early in the breeding season. Previously inseminated cows were treated for 7 days with progesterone (via a previously used intravaginal progesterone-releasing insert [CIDR]) beginning 13 days after AI. In addition, injections of estrogen (estradiol benzoate [EB] or estradiol cypionate [ECP]) were given at insertion and removal of the CIDR insert. Rates of return to estrus and total pregnancy rates were increased after treatments with progesterone and estrogen compared with controls. No ...


Performance Of Beef Heifers Limit-Fed Growing Diets Containing Alfalfa Hay And Wet Corn Gluten Feed, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, N.J. Pike, C.M. Coetzer, H.J. Labrune, A.M. Trater, R.D. Hunter, R.A. Stock, James S. Drouillard Jan 2001

Performance Of Beef Heifers Limit-Fed Growing Diets Containing Alfalfa Hay And Wet Corn Gluten Feed, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, N.J. Pike, C.M. Coetzer, H.J. Labrune, A.M. Trater, R.D. Hunter, R.A. Stock, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three hundred thirty-nine crossbred beef heifers were used in a 99-day growing study to identify optimum combinations of alfalfa hay and wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) in limit-fed growing diets. Diets contained 10, 20, or 30% ground alfalfa hay, and 0, 40, or 68% Sweet Bran® WCGF (dry basis) in a 3 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. An interaction occurred (P<0.05) between level of alfalfa hay and level of WCGF for both average daily gain and feed efficiency. Increasing the levels of alfalfa hay or WCGF reduced cattle performance, with the exception of the 30% alfalfa hay and 40% WCGF diet, which supported average daily gains similar (P>0.10) to diets containing 20 or 30% alfalfa hay and no WCGF. Feed efficiencies for the 30% alfalfa hay and 40% WCGF diet were better (P<0.05) than the diet containing 30% alfalfa hay and no WCGF. Dry matter intake as measured two hours after feeding increased linearly (P<0.01) with increasing levels of alfalfa hay, and decreased linearly (P<0.01) with increasing levels of WCGF. This study suggests that including WCGF at 40% of the diet (dry basis) can effectively replace steam-flaked corn in limit-fed diets containing 20 or 30% alfalfa hay.


Using A Mixture Of Cottonseed Hulls And Cottonseed Meal To Replace Alfalfa Hay In Diets For Stressed Feeder Calves, T.B. Farran, R.D. Hunter, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, Dale A. Blasi, James S. Drouillard Jan 2001

Using A Mixture Of Cottonseed Hulls And Cottonseed Meal To Replace Alfalfa Hay In Diets For Stressed Feeder Calves, T.B. Farran, R.D. Hunter, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, Dale A. Blasi, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One 28-day receiving experiment was conducted using 625 exotic x British cross heifers to evaluate growth performance and morbidity on receiving diets that contained either alfalfa hay or a pellet composed of 65% cottonseed hulls and 35% cottonseed meal as the roughage source. Heifers fed the cotton byproduct pellet consumed more feed (P<0.01) but tended to be less efficient than those fed alfalfa hay. Daily gain was comparable between diets (P>0.05), and the percentages of heifers diagnosed, treated, or retreated for respiratory disease were similar.


Addition Of Urea To Finishing Cattle Diets Containing Steam-Flaked Corn And Wet Corn Gluten Feed, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, N.J. Pike, C.M. Coetzer, H.J. Labrune, A.M. Trater, R.D. Hunter, R.A. Stock, James S. Drouillard Jan 2001

Addition Of Urea To Finishing Cattle Diets Containing Steam-Flaked Corn And Wet Corn Gluten Feed, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, N.J. Pike, C.M. Coetzer, H.J. Labrune, A.M. Trater, R.D. Hunter, R.A. Stock, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three hundred thirty-nine crossbred beef heifers were used in a 74-day finishing study to evaluate effects of adding 0.5% urea to finishing diets containing steam-flaked corn and 34% (dry basis) Sweet Bran® wet corn gluten feed (WCGF). Diets were fed once daily ad libitum. Urea addition tended (P<0.06) to increase finishing average daily gain, to improve (P<0.12) feed efficiency, and to increase (P<0.06) fat thickness. Heifers fed urea had a lower percentage (P<0.03) of carcasses grading USDA Choice. This study suggests that finishing diets containing a combination of steam-flaked corn and WCGF may benefit from addition of urea as a source of supplemental ruminally available nitrogen.


Influence Of Increasing Niacin On Growth Performance And Carcass Characteristics Of Grow-Finish Pigs Reared In A Commercial Environment, D E. Real, E Alonso, Jim L. Nelssen, John A. Unruh, Michael D. Tokach, Robert D. Goodband, Joel M. Derouchey, Steven S. Dritz Jan 2001

Influence Of Increasing Niacin On Growth Performance And Carcass Characteristics Of Grow-Finish Pigs Reared In A Commercial Environment, D E. Real, E Alonso, Jim L. Nelssen, John A. Unruh, Michael D. Tokach, Robert D. Goodband, Joel M. Derouchey, Steven S. Dritz

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

There were 1,243 growing pigs used to determine the effects of increasing dietary niacin on growth performance and meat quality of pigs reared in a commercial environment. The dietary treatments consisted of a control diet (no added niacin) or the control diet with 12.5, 25, 50, 100, or 500 g/ton of added niacin. Increasing dietary niacin decreased ADFI and improved F:G for the overall study. Increasing dietary niacin improved carcass shrink, ultimate pH, drip loss percentage, and loin color. Increasing dietary niacin up to 50 ppm improved feed efficiency, but higher concentrations (up to 50 ppm ...


Interactive Effects Between Paylean™ (Ractopamine Hcl) And Dietary Lysine On Pork Quality, Loin, Belly, And Ham Composition, M J. Webster, D E. Real, J C. Woodworth, T A. Marsteller, Robert D. Goodband, Michael D. Tokach, John A. Unruh, Jim L. Nelssen, Joel M. Derouchey, Steven S. Dritz Jan 2001

Interactive Effects Between Paylean™ (Ractopamine Hcl) And Dietary Lysine On Pork Quality, Loin, Belly, And Ham Composition, M J. Webster, D E. Real, J C. Woodworth, T A. Marsteller, Robert D. Goodband, Michael D. Tokach, John A. Unruh, Jim L. Nelssen, Joel M. Derouchey, Steven S. Dritz

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 432 pigs were used to evaluate the effects of Paylean and dietary lysine on pork quality and loin, belly, and ham composition. The 12 dietary treatments included Paylean (0, 4.5, and 9.0 g/ton) and 4 levels of lysine. For pigs fed no Paylean, lysine levels were 0.60, 0.80, 1.00, and 1.20%. For pigs fed 4.5 or 9.0 g/ton of Paylean, lysine levels were 0.80, 1.00, 1.20, and 1.40%. The results indicate that pigs fed Paylean and increasing levels of lysine will have less ...