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Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

2000

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Articles 1 - 30 of 104

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Determination Of The Amount Of Wet Corn Gluten Feed To Include In Diets For Lactating Dairy Cows, M. J. Vanbaale, Michael V. Scheffel, Evan C. Titgemeyer, R.U. Lindquist Jan 2000

Determination Of The Amount Of Wet Corn Gluten Feed To Include In Diets For Lactating Dairy Cows, M. J. Vanbaale, Michael V. Scheffel, Evan C. Titgemeyer, R.U. Lindquist

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows were used in six 4x4 Latin squares with 28- day periods to determine inclusion rates for wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) in diets for lactating dairy cows. Cows were housed in a tie-stall barn and fed diets to meet or exceed NRC (1989) nutrient requirements. Experimental treatments were 1) control, 2) WCGF constituting 20%, 3) WCGF constituting 27.5%, and 4) WCGF constituting 35% of the diet dry matter. Cows fed WCGF consumed more dry matter (P<0.01) and produced more (P<0.001) milk, energy-corrected milk, and fat-corrected milk than cows fed the control diet. Dry matter intakes were 58.9 lb/day for control and 60.2 lb/day for those cows consuming WCGF diets. Cows fed the control diet produced 83.2 lb/day of milk, whereas those fed WCGF diets produced 91.5 lb/day. Production efficiency was increased (P<0.001) on the WCGF diets. The percentage of fat in milk, total protein production, and milk urea nitrogen were higher (P<0.01) for cows fed WCGF diets than controls. Plasma glucose, total αamino nitrogen, urea nitrogen, and tryglycerides were similar between cows fed the control and WCGF diets. No differences occurred in percentages of protein, lactose, or solids-not-fat content, nor was somatic cell count affected by the addition of WCGF. Body weight and condition score were not affected by treatment. We conclude that WCGF is an excellent feed for lactating dairy cows when included in the diet at 20%, 27.5%, or 35% of the dry matter.; Dairy Day, 2000, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2000;


Mastitis Management-Effective Methods To Reduce Somatic Cell Counts, John F. Smith, Michael J. Brouk Jan 2000

Mastitis Management-Effective Methods To Reduce Somatic Cell Counts, John F. Smith, Michael J. Brouk

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Mastitis is the most costly health concern in the dairy industry today. Annual losses have been estimated at $180 to 185 per cow. Based on this figure, annual losses for Kansas producers may exceed $15 million. Nationally, mastitis may cost the industry $1.8 billion annually. Although treatment and premature culling for clinical mastitis are costly, about two-thirds of the cost is associated with reduced milk production caused by subclinical mastitis. Effective mastitis control programs are necessary for the dairy industry today. Prevention of subclinical mastitis is the key to lowering the somatic cell counts (SCC). Elevated bulk tank SCC ...


Silage Management: Important Practices Often Overlooked, K.K. Bolsen, B.E. Brent, M.K. Siefers, M.E. Uriarte Jan 2000

Silage Management: Important Practices Often Overlooked, K.K. Bolsen, B.E. Brent, M.K. Siefers, M.E. Uriarte

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Four important silage management practices that are in the control of livestock producers and that are sometimes poorly implemented or overlooked entirely include: inoculating, packing, sealing, and managing the feedout face.; Dairy Day, 2000, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2000;


Flushing Sand-Laden Manure, Joseph P. Harner, T.D. Strahm, James P. Murphy Jan 2000

Flushing Sand-Laden Manure, Joseph P. Harner, T.D. Strahm, James P. Murphy

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sand can be handled successfully either in a scrape or flush system by developing handling systems that allow for the sand-laden manure to settle prior to the effluent entering a lagoon. The abrasiveness and density of sand create problems in handling the manure. Manure weighs about 60 lb/cu ft, whereas sand has a density of 120 lb/cu ft. Sand-laden manure will have an approximate density of 80 lb/cu ft, if 30% of the manure is sand. Because sand is heavier, it will not remain in suspension as long as manure and settles rapidly. Many problems associated with ...


Salmonella Dublin: A Threat To Dairy Heifer Survival And Future Performance, D.G. Schmidt, D.P. Gnad, J.M. Sargeant, John E. Shirley Jan 2000

Salmonella Dublin: A Threat To Dairy Heifer Survival And Future Performance, D.G. Schmidt, D.P. Gnad, J.M. Sargeant, John E. Shirley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Salmonella dublin is a bacterium that can have devastating effects in dairy herds. It is most deadly with calves that range in age from 10 days to 5 months. Salmonella dublin is shed from carrier animals through feces, milk, and colostrum and spread by oral ingestion. Clinical signs are not detected easily until after the infection is well established. Calves may suffer from septicemia, diarrhea, fatigue, and unthriftiness. Death is not an uncommon outcome of this disease. Clinical signs of infection in adults may range from none to enteritis or abortion. Combating the disease requires an awareness of the disease ...


Total Blood Protein As An Indicator Of Colostral Sufficiency And Morbidity In Dairy Calves, D.G. Schmidt, D.P. Gnad, J.M. Sargeant, John E. Shirley Jan 2000

Total Blood Protein As An Indicator Of Colostral Sufficiency And Morbidity In Dairy Calves, D.G. Schmidt, D.P. Gnad, J.M. Sargeant, John E. Shirley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Total blood protein measured in calves between 1 and 7 days of age is a good indicator of the sufficiency of colostral intake and level of immunity passed to the calf. This measurement can be used to improve calf management strategies and thereby calf performance. Total blood protein concentrations are associated with immunoglobulin absorption in the neonatal calf, which can impact calf morbidity and mortality. Blood protein >5.5 g/dl indicates sufficient immunoglobulin absorption, and blood protein <5.0 g/dl indicates insufficient absorption. Insufficient immunoglobulin absorption increases the risk of calf morbidity and mortality. The dry cow health program, proper collection, and management of colostrum help ensure that quality colostrum is available for the newborn calf. Proper colostrum administration and low-stress calf management also ensure maximal immunoglobulin absorption. Timing of colostral intake affects total blood protein concentrations. The calf's ability to absorb immunoglobulins is reduced significantly 12 hr after birth. Therefore, it is critical to administer colostrum during the first few hours of life. Total blood protein can be used to determine if the calf has absorbed sufficient immunoglobulins from the colostrum.; Dairy Day, 2000, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2000;


Antibiotic Versus Nonantibiotic Products For The Treatment Of Papillomatous Digital Dermatitis (Hairy Heel Wart) In Dairy Cattle, J.M. Sargeant, D.P. Gnad, J. Isch, H. Bathina Jan 2000

Antibiotic Versus Nonantibiotic Products For The Treatment Of Papillomatous Digital Dermatitis (Hairy Heel Wart) In Dairy Cattle, J.M. Sargeant, D.P. Gnad, J. Isch, H. Bathina

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A field trial was conducted to compare oxytetracycline to three nonantibiotic therapies using bandage protocols for the treatment of hairy heel warts. Affected feet were bandaged for 4 days with either of the four products. Over a 28-day period following bandage removal, heel warts on 44 cows (11 per treatment group) were evaluated based on size, degree of pain, color, and lesion appearance. No differences were detected among treatments, suggesting that nonantibiotic therapies used in bandage protocols may be as effective as oxytetracycline.; Dairy Day, 2000, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2000;


Economics Of Cooling Cows To Reduce Seasonal Variation In Peak Milk Production, Kevin C. Dhuyvetter Jan 2000

Economics Of Cooling Cows To Reduce Seasonal Variation In Peak Milk Production, Kevin C. Dhuyvetter

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The economic impact of cooling cows to reduce the seasonal variation in peak milk production was estimated using researchbased lactation curves and peak production numbers for a commercial dairy operation in Kansas. Reducing the seasonal drop in peak production that occurs in the late summer and fall months by 29% or more is profitable for second or higher lactation cows. This reduction represents an increase in total milk production over the entire lactation of slightly over 1% and an increase in the average annual peak production of only 1 lb. This indicates that achieving at least the breakeven level for ...


Monensin: An Overview Of Its Application In Lactating Dairy Cow Diets, J.M. Defrain, John E. Shirley Jan 2000

Monensin: An Overview Of Its Application In Lactating Dairy Cow Diets, J.M. Defrain, John E. Shirley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The efficiency of feedstuff utilization by ruminal microorganisms and the cow's genetic ability to convert feed nutrients into milk and milk components are major factors that influence the profitability of a dairy herd. Monensin's ability to modify the movement of ions across biological membranes leads to alterations in bacterial populations and subsequent changes in the proportion of volatile fatty acids produced during ruminal fermentation. Manipulating ruminal microbial populations with ionophores has the potential to improve performance by reducing ketosis, acidosis, and bloat and increasing digestive efficiency. Monensin improves fiber digestion by preventing suboptimal ruminal pH, enhances amino acid ...


Keeping Cows Cool, John F. Smith, Joseph P. Harner, Michael J. Brouk Jan 2000

Keeping Cows Cool, John F. Smith, Joseph P. Harner, Michael J. Brouk

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Heat stress occurs when a dairy cow's internal heat load is greater than her capacity to lose unwanted heat to the environment. Effects of heat stress include: increased respiration rate, increased water intake, increased sweating, decreased dry matter intake, slower rate of feed passage, decreased blood flow to internal organs, decreased milk production, and poor reproductive performance. Lower milk production and reproductive performance cause economic losses to dairy producers. The ordered priorities for reducing heat are: increasing water availability; providing shade in the housing areas (both dry and lactating cows) and holding pen; reducing walking distance to the parlor ...


Anestrus In Lactating Dairy Cows Before Ovulation Synchronization, J.A. Cartmill, S.E. Zarkouny, Hensley, Jeffrey S. Stevenson Jan 2000

Anestrus In Lactating Dairy Cows Before Ovulation Synchronization, J.A. Cartmill, S.E. Zarkouny, Hensley, Jeffrey S. Stevenson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The incidence of anestrus in dairy cattle prior to first inseminations carried out after a minimum of 60 days postpartum ranged from 4 to 58% in first-lactation cows and 14 to 50% in older cows. Dairy cows with more days in milk, older than 2 years, and in better body condition (probably reflective of greater postpartum dry matter intakes) were more likely to cycle than thinner cows. Cows that were not cycling before the first week of insemination conceived at lower rates and took longer to become pregnant.; Dairy Day, 2000, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2000;


Embryo Survival In Lactating Dairy Cows, J.A. Carmill, S.E. Zarkouny, B.A. Hensley, Jeffrey S. Stevenson Jan 2000

Embryo Survival In Lactating Dairy Cows, J.A. Carmill, S.E. Zarkouny, B.A. Hensley, Jeffrey S. Stevenson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Rates of embryo survival in lactating dairy cows were assessed in three separate studies. Based on pregnancy diagnoses 27 to 29 days after timed inseminations, survival to days 40 to 50 or day 57, depending on the study, varied from 9 to 88% in cows that were not cycling before insemination compared to 57 to 90% in cows that were cycling. Previously anestrous cows had lower rates of survival. In one study, supplementing cows with progesterone before insemination improved embryo survival.; Dairy Day, 2000, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2000;


Field Day 2000, Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station And Cooperative Extension Service Jan 2000

Field Day 2000, Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station And Cooperative Extension Service

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Each Field Day report consists of individual research reports on topics specific to the region, including cultural methods for most of the major crops grown in Kansas, mitigating the effects of weeds, insects, and disease associated with those crops, and irrigation. Research is conducted and reports written by staff of the K-State Research and Extension Southwest Research Extension Center.


Kansas Fertilizer Research 1999, Ray E. Lamond Jan 2000

Kansas Fertilizer Research 1999, Ray E. Lamond

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

No abstract provided.


Effects Of Dietary L-Carnitine On Growth Performance Of Nursery Pigs, D E. Real, M J. Rincker, M E. Steidinger, S D. Carter, K Q. Owen, Jim L. Nelssen, Robert D. Goodband, Michael D. Tokach, Steven S. Dritz Jan 2000

Effects Of Dietary L-Carnitine On Growth Performance Of Nursery Pigs, D E. Real, M J. Rincker, M E. Steidinger, S D. Carter, K Q. Owen, Jim L. Nelssen, Robert D. Goodband, Michael D. Tokach, Steven S. Dritz

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Four experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of added dietary Lcarnitine on growth performance of nursery pigs. Pigs were fed a control diet containing no added L-carnitine or the control diet with 25, 50, 75, or 100 ppm of added L-carnitine (25, 50, or 100 ppm in Exp. 4). In Exps. 1, 2, and 3 for the overall study, ADG and F/G improved with increasing dietary L-carnitine. In Exp. 4, pigs fed increasing L-carnitine had improved ADG from d 0 to 3 and d 10 to 24. Increasing added carnitine improved F/G from d 10 to 24 ...


Variation In The Digestiility Of Amino Acids In Soybean Meal From A Single Processing Plant, D J. Lee, C A. Maloney, D W. Dean, H Cao, Joe D. Hancock, Joel M. Derouchey Jan 2000

Variation In The Digestiility Of Amino Acids In Soybean Meal From A Single Processing Plant, D J. Lee, C A. Maloney, D W. Dean, H Cao, Joe D. Hancock, Joel M. Derouchey

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Digestibilities of amino acids among samples of soybean meal (SBM) collected during a fall harvest season (4 collections made 15 d apart) were similar, except that true digestibility from tryptophan was lower for a sample collected on d 30 of the experiment vs SMB samples collected on the other dates. Our data suggest that proximate components and amino acid digestibilities of the SBM were very consistent and uniform during the 45 d of sample collection in one processing plant.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 16, 2000


Effects Of Sorghum Genotype On Milling Characteristics And Growth Performance Of Nursery Pigs, C L. Jones, Joe D. Hancock, Keith C. Behnke, C M. Sowder, Leland J. Mckinney Jan 2000

Effects Of Sorghum Genotype On Milling Characteristics And Growth Performance Of Nursery Pigs, C L. Jones, Joe D. Hancock, Keith C. Behnke, C M. Sowder, Leland J. Mckinney

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The sorghums used in our experiment (mill-run, red feed-quality, and white food-quality) had greater true grinding efficiency than corn. Mill-run sorghum also ground easier and with greater true efficiency than the red and food quality (white seed/tan plant) experimental sorghums. Diets with the red sorghum had greater pellet production rate and pellet durability index than diets with the food-quality sorghum. In a nursery pig growth assay, corn-based diets had greater digestibility of gross energy than the sorghum diets, and the white sorghum had greater digestibilities of dry matter, nitrogen, and gross energy than the red sorghum. However, ADG, ADFI ...


Effects Of Frequency Of Supplementation On Performance Of Beef Cows Grazing Winter Pasture, C.G. Farmer, R.C. Cochran, D.D. Simms, E.A. Klevesahl, T.A. Wickersham Jan 2000

Effects Of Frequency Of Supplementation On Performance Of Beef Cows Grazing Winter Pasture, C.G. Farmer, R.C. Cochran, D.D. Simms, E.A. Klevesahl, T.A. Wickersham

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred twenty spring-calving Hereford x Angus cows grazing low-quality tallgrass-prairie forage during the winter of 1998 were fed a 43% crude protein supplement 2, 3, 5, or 7 days a week. Supplement was fed at 4 lb/head daily to cows supplemented daily. The other cows still received 28 lb per week but divided equally among feedings. Cumulative performance (measured by changes in body condition score and body weight) was slightly better with increased supplementation frequency. However, the magnitude of differences in body condition and body weight changes, even for the most extreme treatment comparisons, were relatively small.


The Effect Of Long-Term Management Of Native Grass Pastures On Steer Gains, F.K. Brazle, Dale L. Lanham, Jeffrey L. Davidson Jan 2000

The Effect Of Long-Term Management Of Native Grass Pastures On Steer Gains, F.K. Brazle, Dale L. Lanham, Jeffrey L. Davidson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three hundred thirteen mixed breed steers (558 lb) were used to determine the effect of long-term management of native grass pastures on gain. Steers were allotted randomly to eight pastures previously grazed for 1/2 season (1 steer/2 acres from April to July 15, 81 days) or 3/4 season (1 steer/3 acres from April to August 15, 112 days) from 1990 to 1998. In 1999, all pastures were stocked at 1 steer/2 acres and grazed 83 days until July 15 or 16. The steers received free-choice mineral and were supplemented six times with 2 lb of ...


Effects Of Nonprotein Nitrogen Source In Blocks On Intake And Digestion Of Prairie Hay By Steers, C.A. Löest, James S. Drouillard, B.D. Lambert, A.M. Trater, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 2000

Effects Of Nonprotein Nitrogen Source In Blocks On Intake And Digestion Of Prairie Hay By Steers, C.A. Löest, James S. Drouillard, B.D. Lambert, A.M. Trater, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This intake and digestion study evaluated source of nonprotein nitrogen in cooked molasses blocks supplemented to 18 steers (590 lb) with ad libitum access to prairie hay, Treatments were 1) control (no block), 2) a block containing 60% crude protein with 83% from urea (UREA block), and 3) a block containing 60% crude protein with 42% from urea and 42% from biuret (UREA/BIURET block). Blocks were broken into small pieces to facilitate rapid consumption and fed once daily at .125% of body weight. Forage intake increased by 22%, total intakes (forage plus block) increased by 28%, and digestible organic ...


Effects Of Nonprotein Nitrogen Source In Blocks On Rumen Parameters Of Steers Fed Prairie Hay, C.A. Löest, B.D. Lambert, A.M. Trater, Evan C. Titgemeyer, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Effects Of Nonprotein Nitrogen Source In Blocks On Rumen Parameters Of Steers Fed Prairie Hay, C.A. Löest, B.D. Lambert, A.M. Trater, Evan C. Titgemeyer, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Six ruminally cannulated steers (1012 lb) were fed prairie hay ad libitum supplemented with cooked molasses blocks that contained either 60% crude protein 83% of which came from urea (UREA block) or 60% crude protein with 42% from urea and 42% from biuret (UREA/BIURET block). Blocks were broken into small pieces to facilitate consumption and were fed once daily at .125% of body weight. Rumen samples were collected on days 3, 7, 14, and 21 at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 16 hours after feeding blocks. Averaged over time, ruminal ammonia and total volatile fatty acid ...


Effects Of Grazing System On Performance Of Cow-Calf Pairs Grazing Bermudagrass Pastures Interseeded With Wheat And Legumes, Lyle W. Lomas, Joseph L. Moyer, K.P. Coffey, George A. Milliken Jan 2000

Effects Of Grazing System On Performance Of Cow-Calf Pairs Grazing Bermudagrass Pastures Interseeded With Wheat And Legumes, Lyle W. Lomas, Joseph L. Moyer, K.P. Coffey, George A. Milliken

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 96 fall-calving cows and 64 calves grazed bermudagrass interseeded with wheat and legumes during 1996, 1997, and 1998 in either a continuous or rotational system stocked at equal rates. Legume cover, available forage dry matter, residual hay production, gains of cows and calves grazing wheat interseeded into bermudagrass, and gains of cows grazing bermudagrass interseeded with legumes were measured. Grazing system had no effect on legume cover, available forage dry matter, gains of cows and calves (wheat phase), and gains of cows (legume phase); however, rotationally grazed pastures produced more residual hay than those grazed continuously.


Integrated Control Of Sericea Lespedeza In Kansas, Walter H. Fick Jan 2000

Integrated Control Of Sericea Lespedeza In Kansas, Walter H. Fick

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two experiments were conducted near Maple Hill, KS in 1998 to compare the effectiveness of herbicides and mowing used alone and in combination for control of sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata). Remedy® at 0.5 lb/acre was more effective when applied during the vegetative growth stage (>87%) than during flowering or seed production. Ally® at 0.4 oz/acre provided control equivalent to Remedy and was equally effective at both the vegetative and bloom stages. Both herbicides provided less than 60% control when applied during seed production. A single mowing on July 8 was not effective. Mowing followed in 6 ...


Effects Of Stage Of Maturity At Harvest And Kernel Processing On The Nutrient Digestibility Of Corn Silage, T.J. Wistuba, L.A. Whitlock, M.K. Siefers, K.K. Bolsen, Ronald V. Pope Jan 2000

Effects Of Stage Of Maturity At Harvest And Kernel Processing On The Nutrient Digestibility Of Corn Silage, T.J. Wistuba, L.A. Whitlock, M.K. Siefers, K.K. Bolsen, Ronald V. Pope

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Twelve ruminally cannulated crossbred steers were used to evaluate the effects of stage of maturity and kernel processing (rolling) of whole-plant corn silage on nutrient digestibilities. The six silage rations were: 50% milkline, 80% milkline, and 7 days after-black layer (7BL) each ensiled processed (rolled) or unprocessed. Steers consuming the 80% milkline and 7BL processed rations had numerically higher DM and OM digestibilities, and all processed rations had numerically higher starch digestibilities. However, the three processed rations had numerically lower fiber digestibilities (NDF and/or ADF). Steers consuming the 80% milkline rations had numerically higher nutrient digestibilities than those fed ...


Supplementation Strategies For Forage-Fed Beef Steers, R.D. Hunter, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard, Dale A. Blasi Jan 2000

Supplementation Strategies For Forage-Fed Beef Steers, R.D. Hunter, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard, Dale A. Blasi

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A comparison was made of different supplementation strategies for steer calves wintered on brome hay for 109 days. Treatments consisted of no supplement, 1.33 lb/head daily of a 30% protein range cube, a commercially available free-choice block supplement containing 40% crude protein (19% as non-protein nitrogen), and a soy-based block supplement containing soy solubles and full-fat soybeans with 40% crude protein (25% as nonprotein nitrogen). Following the backgrounding phase, steers were placed onto finishing rations and fed for an additional 152 days before being slaughtered. Gain during the growing phase was greater for all supplemented cattle than for ...


Limiting Amino Acids For Holstein Steers Fed Soybean Hull-Based Diets, R.H. Greenwood, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 2000

Limiting Amino Acids For Holstein Steers Fed Soybean Hull-Based Diets, R.H. Greenwood, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A study was conducted to determine the limiting amino acids for cattle fed soybean hullbased diets. Ruminally cannulated Holstein steers (335 lb) were maintained in metabolism crates, fed the same basal diet (73% soyhulls, 19% alfalfa), and given the same intraruminal infusions (400 g/day acetate to increase energy supply without increasing microbial protein supply). Steers were infused into the abomasum with a complete mixture of the 10 essential amino acids or the mixture with histidine; tryptophan; arginine; phenylalanine; or the three branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine) removed. Nitrogen retention was reduced by removal of either histidine or ...


In Vitro Degradation Of Betaine By Ruminal Microbes, C.A. Löest, C.K. Armendariz, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 2000

In Vitro Degradation Of Betaine By Ruminal Microbes, C.A. Löest, C.K. Armendariz, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

An in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the degradation of betaine sources by rumen microbes. Five sources of betaine (anhydrous betaine, betaine-HCl, feed-grade betaine, lipidcoated betaine, and concentrated separator byproduct) were incubated in rumen fluid collected from steers fed grain- or forage-based diets. In vitro degradation of betaine was slower with the high roughage diet than the grain diet. Betaine from concentrated separator by-product was degraded most rapidly, but no large differences occurred among the other four sources. The disappearance of betaine from lipid-coated product indicates that it did not resist ruminal degradation. Although betaine from all sources was ...


Effects Of Supplementation Of Limit-Fed Growing Diets With Either Soybean Meal Or Nonenzymatically Browned Soybean Meal On Steer Performance, C.M. Coetzer, C.A. Löest, D.J. Bindel, H. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, T.A. Nutsch, James J. Higgins, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Effects Of Supplementation Of Limit-Fed Growing Diets With Either Soybean Meal Or Nonenzymatically Browned Soybean Meal On Steer Performance, C.M. Coetzer, C.A. Löest, D.J. Bindel, H. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, T.A. Nutsch, James J. Higgins, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Seventy two individually fed Angus x Hereford steers (642 lb) were used to evaluate the effects of supplementing limit-fed, growing diets with either soybean meal (SBM) or nonenzymatically browned soybean meal (NSBM). Eight steers were allotted to a control diet composed of 39.1% high-moisture corn, 42% cottonseed hulls, 10.4% ground corn, 5% cane molasses 2.25% urea, and 1.5% vitamins and minerals (dry basis). The remaining steers were allotted to diets that derived 100, 80, 60, or 40% of their supplemental protein from SBM or 60, 45, 30, or 15% of their supplemental protein from NSBN. The ...


Increasing Levels Of Rumensin® In Limit-Fed, High Energy, Growing Diets For Beef Steers And Effects On Subsequent Finishing Performance, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Increasing Levels Of Rumensin® In Limit-Fed, High Energy, Growing Diets For Beef Steers And Effects On Subsequent Finishing Performance, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred sixty-four crossbred beef steers were used to determine optimal Rumensin ® concentrations in limit-fed, high-energy, growing diets. Diets contained 30, 40, or 50 grams of Rumensin per ton of dry matter (R30, R40, and R50). Average daily gain and feed efficiency during the growing phase were not different (P>.80) among treatments. Steers that received R50 in the growing phase had the highest average daily gains during the finishing phase (P<.05). This resulted in heavier carcass weights for R50 than R30 (P<.05) and R40 (P<.12). Feed efficiencies during the finishing phase were not different among treatments (P>.40).


Effects Of High-Grain Or High-Roughage Transition Diets On Finishing Performance Of Cattle Previously Fed High-Concentrate Growing Diets, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Effects Of High-Grain Or High-Roughage Transition Diets On Finishing Performance Of Cattle Previously Fed High-Concentrate Growing Diets, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three hundred twenty-eight crossbred beef steers previously fed high-concentrate growing diets had ad libitum access to one of two transition diets prior to initiation of the finishing phase. Transition diets consisted of 58% steam-flaked corn and 30% alfalfa hay or of 23% steamflaked corn and 65% alfalfa hay (DM basis). Average daily gains, dry matter intakes, and feed efficiencies during the transition phase were greater for steers fed the high-grain diet than for steers fed the high-roughage diet (P<.01). This resulted in heavier carcass weights at the end of the subsequent finishing phase for steers fed the high-grain transition diet (P<.05). Average daily gains and feed efficiencies in the finishing phase were not affected by the type of diet fed during the transition phase (P>.20).