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Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

1997

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Articles 1 - 30 of 79

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Characterization Of Different Biological Types Of Steers (Cycle Iv): Retail Product Yields, T.L. Wheeler, L.V. Cundiff, R.M. Koch, J.D. Crouse, Michael E. Dikeman Jan 1997

Characterization Of Different Biological Types Of Steers (Cycle Iv): Retail Product Yields, T.L. Wheeler, L.V. Cundiff, R.M. Koch, J.D. Crouse, Michael E. Dikeman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Retail product (RP) yields of 888 steers were obtained from mating Hereford (H) and Angus (A) dams to H or A (HA), Charolais (Ch), Gelbvieh (G b), Pinzgauer (Pz), Shorthorn (Sh), Galloway (Gw), Longhorn (Lh), Nellore (Ne), Piedmontese (Pm), and Salers (Sa) sires. The yields were measured at two trim levels (.30 and .00 in.). Data were evaluated at constant age (426 d), carcass weight (714 lb), and marbling (Small00) endpoints. At a constant age of 426 d, RP% was greater in carcasses from steers sired by Continental European breeds (Gb, Ch, Sa, Pz; 63.3 to 65.5 % at ...


Delineation Of Geographic Markets For Fed Cattle, Ted C. Schroeder Jan 1997

Delineation Of Geographic Markets For Fed Cattle, Ted C. Schroeder

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Determining the extent of geographic markets for fed cattle is important for monitoring performance of the industry. The ability of packing plants to influence prices is determined in part by their ability to segment the market for fed cattle and isolate themselves from plants in other regions. This study analyzed transaction data from 43 U.S. steer and heifer slaughter plants collected by the Grain Inspection Packers and Stockyards Program for approximately a 1-year period during 1992-93. Beef packers procured an average of 64% of their cattle within 75 miles of packing plants, 82 % within 150 miles, and 92% within ...


A Survey Of Purchasers Of Wheat Middlings: Storage, Feeding Practices, And Problems, G.W. Warmann, Keith C. Behnke, Dale A. Blasi Jan 1997

A Survey Of Purchasers Of Wheat Middlings: Storage, Feeding Practices, And Problems, G.W. Warmann, Keith C. Behnke, Dale A. Blasi

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We surveyed 290 purchasers of wheat middlings (WM) from a single flour mill located in central Kansas to characterize the incidence of transport and storage problems and to determine intended animal us e and method of feeding. Over 30% of the 106 respondents had encountered storage problems with WM; mold, spoilage, and bridging in the storage structure were the most common. Over 75% of the respondents who reported no storage problems purchased WM during the winter months and avoided WM purchases at other times, especially during the summer.


Influence Of Implanting Grazing Steers With Ralgro® Or Synovex-S® Followed By Synovex® Plus™ Or A Ralgro®/Synovex® Plus™ Reimplant Program In The Feedlot On Pasture/Finishing Performance And Carcass Merit, T.R. Fankhauser, Gerry L. Kuhl, D.D. Simms, Gerald L. Stokka, James S. Drouillard, Dale A. Blasi Jan 1997

Influence Of Implanting Grazing Steers With Ralgro® Or Synovex-S® Followed By Synovex® Plus™ Or A Ralgro®/Synovex® Plus™ Reimplant Program In The Feedlot On Pasture/Finishing Performance And Carcass Merit, T.R. Fankhauser, Gerry L. Kuhl, D.D. Simms, Gerald L. Stokka, James S. Drouillard, Dale A. Blasi

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In an 84-day pasture/132-day finishing study using 480 crossbred steers (675 lb), Ralgro® increased (P<.05) pasture gains 9.3% compared to nonimplanted controls. Gains of Synovex-S®-implanted steers were intermediate. Pasture treatments were split into two finishing-phase implant treatments: Synovex® Plus™ or initial Ralgro with a Synovex Plus reimplant on day 56. No interactions occurred between pasture and finishing implants with respect to finishing performance or carcass traits. Steers on the Synovex Plus treatment gained 11.7% faster and 7.9% more efficiently (P<.01) during the first 56 days of the finishing phase than the Ralgro-implanted steers. However , when those steers were reimplanted with Synovex Plus, they gained 22.2% faster and 21.1% more efficiently (P<.01) during the last 76 days. Over the entire 132-day finishing phase, the feedlot reimplant program improved rate (4.0%; P<.06) and efficiency (7.5%; P<.01) of gain compared to Synovex Plus alone. Overall , gains and intakes during the finishing phase were similar for all pasture implant treatments. However, control pasture steers were 4.5% more efficient (P<.08) than Ralgro and Synovex steers during the finishing phase. Neither pasture or finishing implant treatment influenced carcass traits. This study indicates that implanting during grazing may reduce feed efficiency during the finishing phase, especially when a feedlot reimplant program is not used. However, this finding disagrees with several previous research studies where pasture implantation had no effect on feedlot performance.


Effect Of Grain Sorghum Particle Size And Digest “M” Enzyme Treatment On Performance Of Growing Steers, T.J. Kessen, D.D. Simms, Gerry L. Kuhl, James S. Drouillard Jan 1997

Effect Of Grain Sorghum Particle Size And Digest “M” Enzyme Treatment On Performance Of Growing Steers, T.J. Kessen, D.D. Simms, Gerry L. Kuhl, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A 73-day growing study utilizing 203 crossbred steers (681 lb) and a digestion trial examined the effect o f sorghum grain particle size on rumen fermentation, ration digestibility, and performance of growing steers fed 37% grain and 63% ground alfalfa. Dry-rolled grain sorghum p article sizes in both trials were about 2000, 1500, and 1000 microns, for the coarse- (CR), medium- (MR), and fine-rolled (FR) treatments , respectively. Coarsely rolled corn (2000 microns) was included as a positive control. In the growing study, half of sorghum was treated at feeding time with an enzyme product, Digest "M". The rations were 35 ...


Protein Requirements Of Growing Steers Limit-Fed Corn-Based Diets, R.H. Wessels, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 1997

Protein Requirements Of Growing Steers Limit-Fed Corn-Based Diets, R.H. Wessels, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Seven steers (513 lb) were used in an experiment to investigate optimal levels and sources of protein in diets limit-fed to allow gain of 2.2 lb/day. Treatments were: a negative-control diet (urea; supplemented, 11.7% crude protein) and six diets containing either 13.5, 15.4, or 17.2% crude protein with either solvent-extracted (SSBM) or expeller-processed (ESBM) soybean meal, in which the soybean meal replaced corn in the control diet. Diets provided 75, 87.5, 100, or 112.5% of estimated crude protein requirement for a gain of 2.2 lb/day. The basal diet contained 83 ...


Effect Of Urea Level In Protein Supplements On Performance By Beef Cows Consuming Low-Quality, Tallgrass-Prairie Forage, B.C. Woods, R.C. Cochran, C.P. Mathis, J.S. Heldt, K. C. Olson, Evan C. Titgemeyer, David M. Grieger Jan 1997

Effect Of Urea Level In Protein Supplements On Performance By Beef Cows Consuming Low-Quality, Tallgrass-Prairie Forage, B.C. Woods, R.C. Cochran, C.P. Mathis, J.S. Heldt, K. C. Olson, Evan C. Titgemeyer, David M. Grieger

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred thirty two Hereford x Angus cows grazing tallgrass-prairie range during winter were used to evaluate the effects of varying the amount of supplemental degradable intake protein (DIP) derived from urea on cow and calf performance. Treatment groups were: 0, 15, 30, and 45% of the supplemental DIP from urea. Supplements were formulated to contain 30% crude protein (CP), with approximately 70% of the CP being DIP. Palatability was not a significant problem within the range of urea inclusion tested. In general, prepartum weight and condition losses were greater with increasing levels of urea, although the magnitude of condition ...


Agronomic And Silage Quality Traits Of Forage Sorghum Cultivars In 1995, M.K. Siefers, J.E. Turner, G.L. Huck, S.A. Anderson, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young, Ronald V. Pope Jan 1997

Agronomic And Silage Quality Traits Of Forage Sorghum Cultivars In 1995, M.K. Siefers, J.E. Turner, G.L. Huck, S.A. Anderson, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young, Ronald V. Pope

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Agronomic and silage quality traits were measure d for 37 forage sorghum cultivars and three grain sorghum hybrids. The 1995 growing season was characterized by above average rainfall in the spring and early summer, and a hard freeze on September 22. At the time of the freeze, 20 cultivars had reached the early-milk to early-dough stage, 12 were in the bloom stage, and the remaining eight were still in the early- to late-boot stage . The late planting date and low plant populations resulted in below-normal whole-plant D M and grain yields. Plant height s for the grain sorghums were near ...


Economics Of Sealing Horizontal Silos, G.L. Huck, J.E. Turner, M.K. Siefers, B.E. Brent, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young, Ronald V. Pope Jan 1997

Economics Of Sealing Horizontal Silos, G.L. Huck, J.E. Turner, M.K. Siefers, B.E. Brent, K.K. Bolsen, Matthew A. Young, Ronald V. Pope

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Determining the value of silage saved by effectively sealing a horizontal silo requires only a few simple calculations, but it is still a concept that is often overlooked by many livestock producers who store large amounts of silage in that manner. Kansas produces about 3.0 million tons of silage annually, primarily from corn and sorghum. A majority of this silage is made and stored in either bunker, trench, or "drive-over" pile silos . Only 20 to 30% of these silos are sealed after filling. Producers who do not seal need to take a second look at the economics of this ...


Milking Twice Daily In The Presence Of A Cow’S Own Calf Fails To Prolong Postpartum Anestrus, G.C. Lamb, J.M. Lynch, B.L. Miller, David M. Grieger, Jeffrey S. Stevenson Jan 1997

Milking Twice Daily In The Presence Of A Cow’S Own Calf Fails To Prolong Postpartum Anestrus, G.C. Lamb, J.M. Lynch, B.L. Miller, David M. Grieger, Jeffrey S. Stevenson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Six treatment s were initiated approximately 15 days after calving: 1) calf was weaned permanently from its dam (calf weaned; CW); 2) calf was present continuously with its dam but contact with the udder was prohibited (calf restricted; CR); 3) calf was present continuously with its dam (calf present; CP); 4) CR dam was suckled twice daily by her own calf (CR+S2x); 5) CW dam was milked twice daily (CW+M2x); 6) CR dam was milked twice daily (CR+ M2x). During the 4-week treatment period , cows in the CR+M2x treatment had twofold greater yield milk and milk components ...


Conception And Pregnancy Rates In Dairy Cows After Various Programmed Breeding Systems, Jeffrey S. Stevenson, K. E. Thompson, Y. Kobayashi Jan 1997

Conception And Pregnancy Rates In Dairy Cows After Various Programmed Breeding Systems, Jeffrey S. Stevenson, K. E. Thompson, Y. Kobayashi

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two experiments were conducted to measure conception and pregnancy rates in lactating dairy cows after various treatments followed by artificial insemination (AI) after detected estrus or at one fixed time. In Experiment 1, Holstein cows in one herd were assigned randomly to four treatments every 3 wk (27, 3-wk cluster groups): 1)Ovsynch33, 2) GnRH+PGF2α, 3) 2xPGF2α, and 4) 2xPGF2α+GnRH. In Experiment 2, Holstein cows in one herd were assigned randomly to two treatments every 3 wk (14, 3-wk cluster groups): 1) Ovsynch48 and 2) GnRH+PGF2α. In both experiments, frozen-thawed semen from multiple sires was used, one ...


Various Estrus-Synchronization Programs For Heifers, Jeffrey S. Stevenson Jan 1997

Various Estrus-Synchronization Programs For Heifers, Jeffrey S. Stevenson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Various programs of estrus synchronization have been tested during the last 6 years to determine the least costly and most efficacious for dairy heifer replacements. Four systems were tested: 1) a modified Ovsynch treatment (GnRH 7 days before PGF2 α followed by GnRH either at 24, 30, 33, 40, or 48 hr, with one fixed-time insemination 16 to 20 hr later); 2) a similar protocol that used GnRH 7 days before PGF 2α followed by insemination at estrus (GnRH + PGF 2α); 3) inseminations after one or two injections of PGF 2α given 14 days apart (PGF2α; heifers not detected in ...


Freestall Design And Management For Cow Comfort, John F. Smith, G. A. Jones, Joseph P. Harner Jan 1997

Freestall Design And Management For Cow Comfort, John F. Smith, G. A. Jones, Joseph P. Harner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The design and management of freestall 4) air or vision. facilities are critical in maintaining cow comfort and high milk production. Dairy produc- Lunge Space ers should be conscious of the factors affecting cow comfort in freestall facilities. These The first reason a freestall may fail is lack factors include: ventilation, water availability, of lunge space. A cow needs forward or side feed availability, stall design, and stall bed- lunge space to maneuver in and out of the stall ding. Dairy producers should strive to have easily. There should be no obstructions in lactating cows standing to be milked; standing ...


Managing The Nutrition Program For Cow Comfort, James R. Dunham Jan 1997

Managing The Nutrition Program For Cow Comfort, James R. Dunham

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Comfortable cows are contented cows. However, cows may be comfortable in their environment but also experience some discomfort because of the nutrition program. A good nutritional management program will improve desircow comfort by providing: 1) the proper balance of nutrients for efficient production; 2) buffers for high energy rations to prevent acidosis and consore feet; 3) rations in which grain cannot be consumed too rapidly; 4) rations with proper amounts of nonfiber carbohydrate; 5) highest quality forages during hot weather; 6) additional moisture in total mixed rations during hot weather; 7) a readily available water source; and 8) a bunk ...


The Effects Of Rbst (Posilac®) On Heat Stressed, Lactating, Dairy Cows, John F. Smith, John E. Shirley, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 1997

The Effects Of Rbst (Posilac®) On Heat Stressed, Lactating, Dairy Cows, John F. Smith, John E. Shirley, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two hundred cows located on a commercial dairy in Mesquite, NM were used to evaluate response to rbST (POSILAC®) during heat stress in the summer of 1996. Cows were paired by days in milk (average = 153 d at initiation of experiment), parity, and milk yield (average = 92 lb at start of experiment). Prior to initiation of the experiment, all cows received rbST, then rbST treatment was discontinued for one cow from each pair. Milk production was monitored for 4 months. No interactions were detected between lactation number and treatment. Cows maintained on rbST gained .09 of a score (1 to ...


Field Day 1997, Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station And Cooperative Extension Service Jan 1997

Field Day 1997, Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station And Cooperative Extension Service

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Each Field Day report consists of individual research reports on topics specific to the region, including cultural methods for most of the major crops grown in Kansas, mitigating the effects of weeds, insects, and disease associated with those crops, and irrigation. Research is conducted and reports written by staff of the K-State Research and Extension Southwest Research Extension Center.


Kansas Fertilizer Research 1996, Ray E. Lamond Jan 1997

Kansas Fertilizer Research 1996, Ray E. Lamond

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

No abstract provided.


Roundup 1997, Kansas State University. Agricultural Research Southeast Agricultural Research Center Center--Hays Jan 1997

Roundup 1997, Kansas State University. Agricultural Research Southeast Agricultural Research Center Center--Hays

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Roundup is the major beef cattle education and outreach event sponsored by the Agricultural Research Center-Hays. The purpose is to communicate timely, applicable research information to producers and extension personnel. The research program of the Agricultural Research Southeast Agricultural Research Center Center-Hays is dedicated to serving the people of Kansas by developing new knowledge and technology to stabilize and sustain long-term production of food and fiber in a manner consistent with conservation of natural resources, protection of the environment, and assurance of food safety. Primary emphasis is on production efficiency through optimization of inputs in order to increase profit margins ...


Effects Of Source And Level Of Added Chromium On Growth Performance Of Starter Pigs, P R. O'Quinn, R E. Musser, K Q. Owen, S A. Blum, Jim L. Nelssen, Michael D. Tokach, Robert D. Goodband Jan 1997

Effects Of Source And Level Of Added Chromium On Growth Performance Of Starter Pigs, P R. O'Quinn, R E. Musser, K Q. Owen, S A. Blum, Jim L. Nelssen, Michael D. Tokach, Robert D. Goodband

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A 35-d growth trial was conducted with conventionally weaned nursery pigs to evaluate the efficacy of supplemental chromium (Cr) as either chromium nieotinate (CrNic) or chromium picolinate (CrPic). Neither source nor level of supplemental Cr had any effect on weanling pig growth performance or immune status. Equal levels of CrNic and CrPic produced similar results, except that pigs fed CrPic had higher serum Cr concentrations than pigs fed CrNic. These data suggest no beneficial responses to supplemental CrNic or CrPic in nursery pig diets.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 20, 1997


Effects Of Sorghum Genotype And Processing Method On Production Characteristics And Growth Performance Of Nursery Pigs, J R. Froeschner, Z J. Cheng, Joe D. Hancock, Keith C. Behnke Jan 1997

Effects Of Sorghum Genotype And Processing Method On Production Characteristics And Growth Performance Of Nursery Pigs, J R. Froeschner, Z J. Cheng, Joe D. Hancock, Keith C. Behnke

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three sorghum varieties that varied in starch composition were fed to Phase II and Phase III pigs to determine if feeding sorghum high in waxiness provided a benefit. In addition, each variety was fed as a meal, standard pellet, and an expanded pellet. As level of waxiness increased, pellet durability index increased numerically and the amount of fines produced decreased numerically. In addition, thermal processing of the diets increased the feeding value. Sorghum genotype had little effect on pig performance.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 20, 1997


Effects Of A High Protein, Whey Protein Concentrate And Spray-Dried Animal Plasma On Growth Performance Of Weanling Pigs, G S. Grinstead, J C. Woodworth, Robert D. Goodband, Jim L. Nelssen, Michael D. Tokach Jan 1997

Effects Of A High Protein, Whey Protein Concentrate And Spray-Dried Animal Plasma On Growth Performance Of Weanling Pigs, G S. Grinstead, J C. Woodworth, Robert D. Goodband, Jim L. Nelssen, Michael D. Tokach

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A 35-d experiment was conducted to compare the effects of increasing spray-dried animal plasma and a high protein whey concentrate (73% CP) on starter pig performance. Spray-dried animal plasma and whey protein concentrate replaced dried skin1 milk on an equal lysine basis. Pigs fed increasing spray-dried animal plasma protein had increased ADG and ADFI from d 0 to 7 after weaning, but not for any other period in the study. Increasing whey protein concentrate had no effect on growth perforn1ance in relation to the pigs fed dried skim milk.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 20, 1997


Determining The Optimal Tryptophan:Lysine Ratio For The Segregated Early-Weaned Pigs (25 To 50 Lb), J A. Loughmiller, D A. Knabe, K Hongtrakul, S Moser, C Civis, P R. O'Quinn, J W. Smith Ii, Jim L. Nelssen, Michael D. Tokach, Robert D. Goodband Jan 1997

Determining The Optimal Tryptophan:Lysine Ratio For The Segregated Early-Weaned Pigs (25 To 50 Lb), J A. Loughmiller, D A. Knabe, K Hongtrakul, S Moser, C Civis, P R. O'Quinn, J W. Smith Ii, Jim L. Nelssen, Michael D. Tokach, Robert D. Goodband

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A 21 d growth trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of increasing the apparent digestible tryptophan:lysine ratio on growth performance of the 25 to 50 lb pig raised in a high-health, segregated early-weaning (SEW) system. Ten diets were fed with two levels of lysine (.75% and 1.10% apparent digestible lysine) and five apparent digestible tryptophan levels (13, 16, 19, 22, or 25% of lysine). Feeding the high dietary lysine consistently improved ADG and FIG and reduced ADFI. Increasing the tryptophan: lysine ratio did not improve overall performance. Based upon our results, the dietary tryptophan level to maximize ...


Fetal And Maternal Responses To High Feed Intake From Day 29 To 45 Of Gestation, R E. Musser, J W. Smith Ii, L L. Burum, C J. Samland, Duane L. Davis, Robert D. Goodband, Michael D. Tokach, Jim L. Nelssen, Theresa J. Rathbun, Steven S. Dritz Jan 1997

Fetal And Maternal Responses To High Feed Intake From Day 29 To 45 Of Gestation, R E. Musser, J W. Smith Ii, L L. Burum, C J. Samland, Duane L. Davis, Robert D. Goodband, Michael D. Tokach, Jim L. Nelssen, Theresa J. Rathbun, Steven S. Dritz

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Parity-four sows were fed either 4.0 Ib/d (control, n = 6) or 14.0 Ib/d (high, n = 9) of feed from d 29 to 45 of gestation. On d 45 of ges~tion, sows were slaughtered and uteri collected for fetal and placental measurements. High-feed-intake sows gained more weight from. d 29 to 45 compared to control sows. Providing feed in excess of established requirements to gestating sows from d 29 to 45 of gestation increased IGF-I concentrations in maternal plasma and decreased crown-rump length variation of the fetus. Increased feed intake resulted in a removal of the ...


Trends In The Swine Industry: Operations And Marketings, J L. Parcell, Kevin C. Dhuyvetter Jan 1997

Trends In The Swine Industry: Operations And Marketings, J L. Parcell, Kevin C. Dhuyvetter

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Trends in the size of swine operations in Kansas and the V. S. are toward fewer and larger operations. The number of operations in Kansas and the U.S. continues to decline; however, the number of hogs marketed has increased because of an increase in operation size. Kansas producers have increased operation size at a slower rate compared to U.S. producers. Kansas ranks tenth nationally in hogs marketed. A migration of swine production from eastern, central, and northern Kansas to southwest Kansas has occurred in the past 5 years.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 20, 1997


Historical Economic Returns To Alternative Swine Enterprises In Kansas, R Jones, Michael R. Langemeier Jan 1997

Historical Economic Returns To Alternative Swine Enterprises In Kansas, R Jones, Michael R. Langemeier

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This study examines historical net returns to average Kansas swine producers over the past 16 years. Swine production has been a profitable enterprise. As expected, average returns per head have been higher for farrow-to-finish producers than for feeder pig finishers, and farrow-to-finish producers have nearly always been able to at least cover variable costs of production.; Swine Day, Manhattan, KS, November 20, 1997


Effects Of L-Carnitine On Performance Of Gestating And Lactating Sows, R E. Musser, K Q. Owen, S A. Blum, C A. Civis, Robert D. Goodband, Michael D. Tokach, Jim L. Nelssen, Steven S. Dritz Jan 1997

Effects Of L-Carnitine On Performance Of Gestating And Lactating Sows, R E. Musser, K Q. Owen, S A. Blum, C A. Civis, Robert D. Goodband, Michael D. Tokach, Jim L. Nelssen, Steven S. Dritz

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 307 sows was used to determine the effects of adding 50 ppm of L-carnitine in gestation and lactation diets on sow and litter performance. Addition of 50 ppm L-carnitine in gestation increased both total litter (34.1 vs 32.1 lb) and pig (3.48 vs 3.27 lb) birth weight. Litter weaning weights increased (99.03 vs 90.71 lb) when sows were fed added L-carnitine during gestation. Sows fed added L-carnitine in gestation had increased IGF-I concentrations on d 60 and 90 (71.3 vs 38.0, and 33.0 vs 25.0 ng/ml ...


Biosecurity In The Dairy, Gerald L. Stokka, Thomas R. Falkner, Patrick Bierman Jan 1997

Biosecurity In The Dairy, Gerald L. Stokka, Thomas R. Falkner, Patrick Bierman

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three strategies exist to control unwanted disease in a livestock operation: 1) prevent the douintroduction of infected cattle, 2) raise the overall level of resistance and specific resistance to infectious disease, and 3) minimize herd exposure to infectious disease. In addition, if unwanted disease exists in the herd, then a plan to eliminate the disease should be implemented. Maintenance of closed herds, testing procedures, vaccination schedules, sanitation, and good husbandry practices are integral parts of biosecurity procedures. The procedures in place should produce a benefit in terms of both economics and public perception that the quality and safety of our ...


Expeller Soybean Meal As A Source Of Rumen Undegradable Protein For Lactating Dairy Cows, John E. Shirley, D. Piehl, Evan C. Titgemeyer, Michael V. Scheffel Jan 1997

Expeller Soybean Meal As A Source Of Rumen Undegradable Protein For Lactating Dairy Cows, John E. Shirley, D. Piehl, Evan C. Titgemeyer, Michael V. Scheffel

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The loss of meat and bone meal as a source of high quality protein for lactating cows creates an increased need for nonanimal sources. Fifty six Holstein cows were used to evaluate expeller soybean meal as a source of rumen undegradable intake (by-pass) protein for high producing cows. Expeller soybean meal tended to improve 3.5% contain fat-corrected milk yield and increased milk fat percentage relative to diets containing either solvent soybean meal or a meat and bone meal:blood meal mixture. In contrast, the protein percentage in milk was depressed significantly when cows were fed expeller soybean meal compared ...


Effects Of Poultry Fat And Choice White Grease On Finishing Pig Growth Performance, General Carcass Characteristics, And Pork Longissimus Muscle Quality, J J. Engel, J W. Smith Ii, Robert D. Goodband, John A. Unruh, Michael D. Tokach, Jim L. Nelssen Jan 1997

Effects Of Poultry Fat And Choice White Grease On Finishing Pig Growth Performance, General Carcass Characteristics, And Pork Longissimus Muscle Quality, J J. Engel, J W. Smith Ii, Robert D. Goodband, John A. Unruh, Michael D. Tokach, Jim L. Nelssen

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Eighty-four crossbred gilts were used to exan1ine the effects of increasing dietary additions of poultry fat (PF) or choice white grease (CWG) on finishing pig growth performance, standard carcass characteristics, and longissimus muscle quality. Increasing CWG or PF improved feed efficiency. Increasing CWG tended to increase then decrease longissimus muscle visual color compared with longissimus muscles from those animals fed PF. Pigs fed CWG had firmer, less exudative, and more purplish-red (measured by a Minolta chronometer) longissimus muscles compared with pigs fed PF. Feeding CWG or PF did not affect standard carcass traits and had minimal effects on longissimus muscle ...


Effects Of Low-Protein, Amino Acid- Fortified Diets, Formulated On A Net Energy Basis, On The Growth Performance And Carcass Characteristics Of Finishing Pigs, J W. Smith Ii, P R. O'Quinn, Michael D. Tokach, Robert D. Goodband, Jim L. Nelssen Jan 1997

Effects Of Low-Protein, Amino Acid- Fortified Diets, Formulated On A Net Energy Basis, On The Growth Performance And Carcass Characteristics Of Finishing Pigs, J W. Smith Ii, P R. O'Quinn, Michael D. Tokach, Robert D. Goodband, Jim L. Nelssen

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two hundred eighty-eight gilts were used to determine the effects of corn-soybean meal or low-protein, amino acid-fortified diets, formulated on a net energy (NE) basis on growth perforn1ance and carcass characteristics. Pigs fed high NE grew faster from 105 to 165 lb. However, pigs fed diets with intact protein grew faster and more efficiently during the finishing period and for the entire trial than those fed low protein, amino acidfortified diets. Carcass data revealed that pigs consuming high NE were fatter and had lower percentage lean than pigs consuming low NE. Additionally, longissimus muscle area tended to be greater in ...