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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Sugarcane Aphid Resistance In Pearl Millet, D. D. Serba, J. P. Michaud Jan 2019

Sugarcane Aphid Resistance In Pearl Millet, D. D. Serba, J. P. Michaud

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sugarcane aphid, (Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner) (Hemiptera: Aphididae)) has become an important pest of sorghum in the US. This recent invasion is assumed to be either as a result of a host shift from sugarcane in the south or introduction of a specialĀ­ized strain from tropical Africa. If host shift happened through adaptive change to infest sorghum, other closely related species such as pearl millet are in danger from this voracious pest. The resistance level of pearl millet genotypes representing A-, B-, R-lines and germplasm were evaluated under climate-controlled growth chamber along with resistant and susceptible sorghum hybrids. Ten plants ...


Extent Of Larval Populations Of Turfgrass Insect Pests At Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center At Manhattan, Ks, Raymond A. Cloyd Jan 2018

Extent Of Larval Populations Of Turfgrass Insect Pests At Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center At Manhattan, Ks, Raymond A. Cloyd

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Many insect pests have a larval or grub stage that resides belowground and feeds on turfgrass roots (Potter, 1998; Vittum et al., 1999; Held and Potter, 2012). The major belowground insect pests (white grubs) associated with turfgrass throughout Midwestern states that are present in Kansas include: May/June beetles (Phyllophaga spp), masked chafers (Cyclocephala spp), and bluegrass billbug (Sphenophorus parvulus) (Miller et al., 2013). However, there is limited information on the annual occurrence of these insect pests affiliated with the common turfgrass species planted in Kansas, including zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica) and Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). Therefore, the objective of this ...


Horn Fly Control And Growth Implants Are Effective Strategies For Heifers Grazing Flint Hills Pasture, S. S. Trehal, J. L. Talley, K. D. Sherrill, T. Spore, R. N. Wahl, W. R. Hollenbeck, Dale Blasi Jan 2017

Horn Fly Control And Growth Implants Are Effective Strategies For Heifers Grazing Flint Hills Pasture, S. S. Trehal, J. L. Talley, K. D. Sherrill, T. Spore, R. N. Wahl, W. R. Hollenbeck, Dale Blasi

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Horn flies (Haematobia irritans (L.)) are considered the most important external parasite that negatively affects pasture-based beef systems with losses estimated to exceed $1 billion annually to the U.S. beef industry. Control strategies have relied heavily on insecticide applications to control horn flies and are implemented when the economic threshold of 200 flies/animal have been exceeded. When horn fly populations are maintained below 200 flies/animal by treating them with insecticides then the level of stress annoyance behaviors such as leg stomping, head throwing, and skin twitching decreases while grazing increases. While most stocker operators utilize some type ...