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VIMS Articles

Oysters -- Virginia

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The Physiography And Extent Of Public Oyster Grounds In Pocomoke Sound, Virginia., James P. Whitcomb, Dexter S. Haven Jan 1987

The Physiography And Extent Of Public Oyster Grounds In Pocomoke Sound, Virginia., James P. Whitcomb, Dexter S. Haven

VIMS Articles

Public oyster grounds in Pocomoke Sound, Virginia, were charted in 1978 using an electronic positioning system to locate areas ~f oysters, shell, sand or mud. Over five thousand stations were occupied and 1,267 samples of the substrate were taken with hydraulically operated patent tongs. The information was used to draw large scale charts showing shorelines, depths, bottom types and out lines of public grounds. Substrates, elevations, slopes, oyster densities and spatfall levels were analyzed.


The Origin And Extent Of Oyster Reefs In The James River, Virginia, Dexter S. Haven, James P. Whitcomb Jan 1983

The Origin And Extent Of Oyster Reefs In The James River, Virginia, Dexter S. Haven, James P. Whitcomb

VIMS Articles

The public oyster grounds (Baylor Survey Grounds) in the James River, VA, were studied with respect to bottom type and oyster density from 1978 to 1981. Approximately 10,118 ha (25,000 acres) were investigated using an electronic positioning system to establish station locations. Bottom types were determined using probing pipes, patent tongs, and an acoustical device. About 17.1% of the bottom was classified as consolidated oyster reef, and 47.5% was moderately productive mud-shell or sand-shell bottoms. The remaining 35.4% was rated as unsuitable for oyster culture. The surface configuration of oyster reef areas in the James ...


Anaerobic Mortalities Of Oysters In Virginia Caused By Low Salinities, J. D. Andrews Jan 1982

Anaerobic Mortalities Of Oysters In Virginia Caused By Low Salinities, J. D. Andrews

VIMS Articles

Oysters on natural beds in the upper seed area of the James River died anaerobically in the winter and early spring of 1979-80 during prolonged exposure to fresh water and low salinities (< 5 ppt). Heavy rains in .the fall of 1979 combined with the usual winter-spring runoff to produce low salinities. Oysters in trays were transplanted in late March and early April to six high-salinity areas where mortalities were found a month later. The oysters died slowly within closed shells because they were unable to feed and respire in the nearly fresh water. This produced a strong, malodorus stench and blackened shell margins that are characteristic of anaerobiotic decay. Similar phenomena occurred previously in the Rappahannock River about 1 May during several wet years during the past three decades. At depths of 5 to 6 m, dissolved oxygen was depleted and everything on the bottom became black with iron and other heavy metal sulfides. Dead oysters were not discovered until June after waters had become aerobic again.