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A Data-Driven Modeling Approach For Simulating Algal Blooms In The Tidal Freshwater Of James River In Response To Riverine Nutrient Loading, Jian Shen, Qubin Qin, Ya Wang, Mac Sisson Apr 2019

A Data-Driven Modeling Approach For Simulating Algal Blooms In The Tidal Freshwater Of James River In Response To Riverine Nutrient Loading, Jian Shen, Qubin Qin, Ya Wang, Mac Sisson

VIMS Articles

Algal blooms often occur in the tidal freshwater (TF) of the James River estuary, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. The timing of algal blooms correlates highly to a summer low-flow period when residence time is long and nutrients are available. Because of complex interactions between physical transport and algal dynamics, it is challenging to predict interannual variations of bloom correctly using a complex eutrophication model without having ahigh-resolution model gridto resolve complexgeometryand anaccurate estimate of nutrientloading to drive the model. In this study, an approach using long-term observational data (from 1990 to 2013) and the Support vector machine (LS-SVM ...


Temporal And Spatial Changes In Fecundity Of Eastern Oysters, Crassostrea Virginica (Gmelin, 1791) In The James River, Virginia, Carrollyn Cox, Roger L. Mann Jan 1992

Temporal And Spatial Changes In Fecundity Of Eastern Oysters, Crassostrea Virginica (Gmelin, 1791) In The James River, Virginia, Carrollyn Cox, Roger L. Mann

VIMS Articles

A~u1t Crass~strea virgi.nic~ ~Gmelin) were examined during the reproductive season of 1986 to determine temporal and spatial vanation m fecundity among md!Vldual female oysters from four reefs in the James River, Virginia. Sex ratio and oyster abu.ndance were. ~so determined to :acilitate ~s~imation of total reproductive output of oyster assemblages. Fecundity was highly vanable, both w1thm and among locations. Vanation was attributed to differences in oyster size, asynchrony and variation in time since pri~r spawning, prevalence of parasites (especially Haplosporidium nelsoni (MSX) and Perkinsus marinus) and differing salinity regimes.


Transport Of Bivalve Larvae In James River, Virginia, J. D. Andrews Jan 1983

Transport Of Bivalve Larvae In James River, Virginia, J. D. Andrews

VIMS Articles

For nearly 100 years, the James River has been the primary source of seed oysters for Virginia. A disease caused by Minchinia nelsoni (MSX) killed most oysters in high-salinity waters in the lower river in 1959 and 1960, and planting has not been resumed in these areas (Andrews 1983). Large populations of oysters on Hampton Bar and near the mouth of the river which served as broodstocks were destroyed. After 1960, setting declined drastically in regularity and intensity to about one tenth of that which occurred in the 1950's. Setting patterns suggest two types of seed areas in Chesapeake ...


Marine Fishes In Fresh And Brackish Waters Of Virginia Rivers, William H. Massman Jan 1954

Marine Fishes In Fresh And Brackish Waters Of Virginia Rivers, William H. Massman

VIMS Articles

In the fresh and brackish waters of the James, Chickahominy, Pamunkey, Mattaponi and Rappahannock rivers in Virginia, 18 species of marine fishes ( exclusive of anadromous and catadromus forms) have been collected. Gunter's (1942) exhaustive survey of the occurrence of Atlantic coast marine fishes in fresh water is here amplified for the most important tidal rivers of Virginia.

Since 1949 intensive collecting has been done in brackish and tidal fresh waters of the Pamunkey and Rappahannock rivers, and numerous. collections have been made in the James, Chickahominy, and Mattaponi.