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VIMS Articles

Bivalve larvae

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Field Studies Of Bivalve Larvae And Their Recruitment To The Benthos: A Commentary, Roger L. Mann Jan 1988

Field Studies Of Bivalve Larvae And Their Recruitment To The Benthos: A Commentary, Roger L. Mann

VIMS Articles

A list of factors influencing the recruitment of bivalve larvae might include, but not be limited to, the following: egg quality, physical environment, food availability, loss to predation and disease during larval development, interplay of passive dispersal (horizontally) by water currents and depth regulation by active swimming, proximity of suitable and available substratum as metamorphic competency is achieved, and availability of sufficient metabolic reserves to complete metamorphosis to the benthic form. While tractable methods exist to quantify aspects of certain members of the above list, the focus of such work has usually been biased towards laboratory experiments or hatchery production ...


Seasonal Changes In The Depth Distribution Of Bivalve Larvae On The Southern New England Shelf, Roger L. Mann Jan 1985

Seasonal Changes In The Depth Distribution Of Bivalve Larvae On The Southern New England Shelf, Roger L. Mann

VIMS Articles

A limited survey was made of the seasonal change in occurrence, depth distribution, size distribution, and species composition of bivalve larvae at a single station on the southern New England shelf during the period April-December 1981. The data were related to temperature structure of the water column and chlorophyll a distribution. Bivalve larvae were most abundant during late August and September at depths greater than 10 m, in water temperatures of 14 to 18°C, and chlorophyll a concentrations of200 p.m length consisted predominantly of the species Modiolus modiolus (Linne), Arctica islandica (Linne) and Spisula solidissima (Dillwyn). Modiolus modiolus ...


Transport Of Bivalve Larvae In James River, Virginia, J. D. Andrews Jan 1983

Transport Of Bivalve Larvae In James River, Virginia, J. D. Andrews

VIMS Articles

For nearly 100 years, the James River has been the primary source of seed oysters for Virginia. A disease caused by Minchinia nelsoni (MSX) killed most oysters in high-salinity waters in the lower river in 1959 and 1960, and planting has not been resumed in these areas (Andrews 1983). Large populations of oysters on Hampton Bar and near the mouth of the river which served as broodstocks were destroyed. After 1960, setting declined drastically in regularity and intensity to about one tenth of that which occurred in the 1950's. Setting patterns suggest two types of seed areas in Chesapeake ...