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Consequences Of Drift And Carcass Decomposition For Estimating Sea Turtle Mortality Hotspots, Bianca Santos, David M. Kaplan, Marjorie A.M. Friedrichs, Susan G. Barco, Katherine L. Mansfield, James P. Manning Jan 2018

Consequences Of Drift And Carcass Decomposition For Estimating Sea Turtle Mortality Hotspots, Bianca Santos, David M. Kaplan, Marjorie A.M. Friedrichs, Susan G. Barco, Katherine L. Mansfield, James P. Manning

VIMS Articles

Sea turtle strandings provide important mortality information, yet knowledge of turtle carcass at-sea drift and decomposition characteristics are needed to better understand and manage where these mortalities occur. We used empirical sea turtle carcass decomposition and drift experiments in the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, USA to estimate probable carcass oceanic drift times and quantify the impact of direct wind forcing on carcass drift. Based on the time period during which free-floating turtle carcasses tethered nearshore were buoyant, we determined that oceanic drift duration of turtle carcasses was highly dependent on water temperature and varied from 2 to 15 days during typical ...


Effects Of The June 1995 Freshet On The Main Virginia Tributaries To The Chesapeake Bay, Herbert M. Austin, Christopher F. Bonzek Jan 1996

Effects Of The June 1995 Freshet On The Main Virginia Tributaries To The Chesapeake Bay, Herbert M. Austin, Christopher F. Bonzek

VIMS Articles

Environmental conditions in the Virginian waters of the Chesapeake Bay area during the summerof 1995 have been characterized as a severe drought. This drought was punctuated on 27 June with a headwater (James and Rappahannock River) rain storm that produced a "freshet". Although it did not rain in the Tidewater area of Virginia, surface salinities were depressed by the run-off, and main-stem bottom ox}'gen levels dropped to z.ero in the James and Rappahannock rivers. The effects of the reduced oxygen were apparent on the James River oyster stock, particularly the reduction in spatfall, and to a lesser degree ...