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Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

2017

Grain sorghum

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Agricultural Bio-Stimulant Application To Enhance Phosphorus Availability In Grain Sorghum, A. Obour Jun 2017

Agricultural Bio-Stimulant Application To Enhance Phosphorus Availability In Grain Sorghum, A. Obour

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of AgZyme and SuperHume (both products of Ag Concepts Corp) application on phosphorus (P) uptake and utilization efficiency in grain sorghum. Treatments were a control, 30 lb P2O5/a, 20 oz/a AgZyme, 20 oz/a AgZyme + 30 lb P2O5/a, 20 oz/a AgZyme + 30 lb P2O5/a + 6 qt/a SuperHume, which were arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Preliminary results in 2016 showed grain sorghum aboveground biomass, grain moisture content, and test weight were not affected ...


Tillage Intensity In A Long-Term Wheat-Sorghum-Fallow Rotation, A. Schlegel Jan 2017

Tillage Intensity In A Long-Term Wheat-Sorghum-Fallow Rotation, A. Schlegel

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This study was initiated in 1991 at the Kansas State University Southwest Research- Extension Center near Tribune, KS. The purpose of the study was to identify the effects of tillage intensity on precipitation capture, soil water storage, and grain yield in a wheat-sorghum-fallow rotation. Grain yields of wheat and grain sorghum increased with decreased tillage intensity in a wheat-sorghum-fallow (WSF) rotation. In 2016, available soil water at wheat and sorghum planting was greater for reduced tillage (RT) than no-tillage (NT) and least for conventional tillage (CT). Averaged across the 16-yr study, available soil water at wheat and sorghum planting was ...


Wheat And Grain Sorghum In Four-Year Rotations, A. Schlegel, J. D. Holman, C. Thompson Jan 2017

Wheat And Grain Sorghum In Four-Year Rotations, A. Schlegel, J. D. Holman, C. Thompson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 1996, an effort began to quantify soil water storage, crop water use, and crop productivity on dryland systems in western Kansas. Research on 4-year crop rotations with wheat and grain sorghum was initiated at the Southwest Research-Extension Center near Tribune, KS. Rotations were wheat-wheat-sorghum-fallow (WWSF), wheatsorghum- sorghum-fallow (WSSF), and continuous wheat (WW). Soil water at wheat planting averaged about 9 in. following sorghum, which is about 3 in. more than the average for the second wheat crop in a WWSF rotation. Soil water at sorghum planting was only about 1 in. less for the second sorghum crop compared with ...


Wheat Stubble Height On Subsequent Corn And Grain Sorghum Crops, A. Schlegel, L. Haag Jan 2017

Wheat Stubble Height On Subsequent Corn And Grain Sorghum Crops, A. Schlegel, L. Haag

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A field study initiated in 2006 at the Southwest Research-Extension Center near Tribune, KS, was designed to evaluate the effects of three wheat stubble heights on subsequent grain yields of corn and grain sorghum. Corn and sorghum yields in 2016 were greater than the long-term average. When averaged from 2007 through 2016, corn grain yields were 10 bu/a greater when planted into either high or strip-cut stubble than into low-cut stubble. Average grain sorghum yields were 6 bu/a (but not significantly) greater in high-cut stubble than low-cut stubble. Similarly, water use efficiency was greater for high or strip-cut ...


Large-Scale Dryland Cropping Systems, A. Schlegel, L. Haag Jan 2017

Large-Scale Dryland Cropping Systems, A. Schlegel, L. Haag

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This study was conducted from 2008 to 2016 at the Kansas State University Southwest Research-Extension Center near Tribune, KS. The purpose of the study was to identify whether more intensive cropping systems can enhance and stabilize production in rainfed cropping systems to optimize economic crop production, more efficiently capture and utilize scarce precipitation, and maintain or enhance soil resources and environmental quality. The crop rotations evaluated were continuous grain sorghum (SS), wheat-fallow (WF), wheat-corn-fallow (WCF), wheat-sorghum-fallow (WSF), wheat-corn-sorghum-fallow (WCSF), and wheat-sorghum-corn-fallow (WSCF). All rotations were grown using no-tillage practices except for WF, which was grown using reduced-tillage. The efficiency of ...