Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 30 of 46

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Food Preference In Drosophila Robusta And Drosophila Tripunctata Following Desiccation, Brad Horton Jan 1998

Food Preference In Drosophila Robusta And Drosophila Tripunctata Following Desiccation, Brad Horton

Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

Drosophila tripunctata and Drosophila robusta are local species trapped on the University of Northern Iowa preserve off of University Avenue. Drosophila literally means "lover of dew". Tripunctata means "three points", it has 3 points on its abdomen. Robusta means "robust", of which this species definitely is. D. tripunctata are a small species, which leaves them with a low volume/surface area ratio. This means they are more susceptible to environmental extremes, particularly the loss of water. D. robusta are a large and "robust" fly, and they are more tolerant of such environmental hardships. "Desiccation" is drying out, or to remove ...


A Tale Of Two Chickens: Exploring The Social And Economic Implications Of Our Food Choices, Laura Bainbridge Jan 1998

A Tale Of Two Chickens: Exploring The Social And Economic Implications Of Our Food Choices, Laura Bainbridge

Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

A century ago chicken was considered a luxury item. In fact, people would eat steak or lobster when they could not afford chicken and ladies' magazines advised on how to substitute veal for chicken in recipes (Gordon, 1996). In 1928, President Hoover promised "a chicken in every pot", but it was not until the 1960's that the poultry industry really took off. Today, there are 15 chickens in every pot; the average American consumes 71.8 pounds of broiler meat annually (Oberholtzer, 1997). Where does all of this chicken come from? Who grows the chicken we eat and how ...


Back Cover Jan 1998

Back Cover

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Carrion Beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) Of Northeastern Iowa: A Comparison Of Baits For Sampling, David R. Coyle, Kirk J. Larsen Jan 1998

Carrion Beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) Of Northeastern Iowa: A Comparison Of Baits For Sampling, David R. Coyle, Kirk J. Larsen

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Carrion beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) were inventoried over a 8-week period from June into August of 1996 at 10 sites in 4 counties of extreme northeastern Iowa. Carrion preference and relative abundance of carrion beetles were studied by use of non-lethal pitfall traps constructed from large plastic plant pots and baited with aged fish, beef liver, chicken, or piglets. A total of 3,183 carrion beetles were collected, representing 11 different species. The most commonly encountered species of carrion beetles in northeastern Iowa included Necrophila americana (71.5%) and Oiceoptoma novaboracense (18.5%). When comparing baits, chicken and fish attracted the ...


Dealing With Death And The Grieving Process, David M. Gabel Jan 1998

Dealing With Death And The Grieving Process, David M. Gabel

Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

There are two things that our society doesn't really openly discuss. Oddly enough, they are things that will affect everyone on this planet regardless of race, religion, gender, class, or nationality. I am speaking of the beginning of life, and the end of life. The subject of how life begins is for some reason "taboo" in our society. Children are told absurd things like children are brought to their parents by birds, such as a stork. Another popular tale is that children are "grown" in gardens and are discovered under leaves. The subject of sex seems to be one ...


Book Review - The Iowa Breeding Bird Atlas, Louis B. Best Jan 1998

Book Review - The Iowa Breeding Bird Atlas, Louis B. Best

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

The Iowa Breeding Bird Atlas is the first comprehensive statewide survey of Iowa's breeding birds. Through the efforts of over 500 people, every county in the state was sampled to provide a record of the composition and distribution of the bird life in Iowa. The project entailed dividing the state into 861 atlas blocks; 83% received at least some coverage and 71 % were completed. Information known through 1995 is included in the text, although the atlas project ended in 1990.


Book Review - Birds In Iowa, Peter Wickham Jan 1998

Book Review - Birds In Iowa, Peter Wickham

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Here is a book that those who are interested in birds and their distribution in Iowa will absolutely have to possess. This volume is the successor to the book Iowa Birds, which was written by the above authors together with three others and published in 1984. It brings our understanding to the number of species of birds and their relative abundance in Iowa up-to-date. Although only twelve years elapsed between the publication of the previous volume and this one, the activity of those interested in identifying birds increased enormously during those years. In addition, their ability to identify and find ...


Cover - Perspectives On The Declining Flora And Fauna Of Iowa: A Symposium, Part 1 Jan 1998

Cover - Perspectives On The Declining Flora And Fauna Of Iowa: A Symposium, Part 1

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Back Cover Jan 1998

Back Cover

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Front Matter Jan 1998

Front Matter

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Safety Issues And Iowa Science Teachers, Jack A. Gerlovich, Ed Wilson, Rahul Parsa Jan 1998

Safety Issues And Iowa Science Teachers, Jack A. Gerlovich, Ed Wilson, Rahul Parsa

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

The National Science Education Standards are providing an excellent blue print for improving science teaching for all students. However, the Standards are placing serious demands on teachers attempts to make science activities inquiry-based, real-life, open-ended, and directly applicable to today's students. This situation is further aggravated when teachers do not know essential science safety information from both federal and state governing agencies, as well as professional organizations. With proper training and tools, however, this problem can be positively addressed.


Checklist Of Instructions For Authors Jan 1998

Checklist Of Instructions For Authors

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Cover - Perspectives On The Declining Flora And Fauna Of Iowa: A Symposium, Part 2 Jan 1998

Cover - Perspectives On The Declining Flora And Fauna Of Iowa: A Symposium, Part 2

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Index For Volume 105 - Notice Of Rate Increase Jan 1998

Index For Volume 105 - Notice Of Rate Increase

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Editorial Board & Iowa Academy Of Science Officers And Directors Jan 1998

Editorial Board & Iowa Academy Of Science Officers And Directors

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Mammals Of Iowa: Holocene To The End Of The 20th Century, John B. Bowles, Daryl L. Howell, Richard P. Lampe, Howard P. Whidden Jan 1998

Mammals Of Iowa: Holocene To The End Of The 20th Century, John B. Bowles, Daryl L. Howell, Richard P. Lampe, Howard P. Whidden

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

This review of Iowa's mammal fauna at the close of the 20th century summarizes changes in distributional patterns following Euroamerican settlement in the early 1800s. Data from historical records, museum specimens, and presettlement late Holocene fossils indicate presence of 69 resident mammals at that time. Hunting pressures and the conversion of prairie and forest to agricultural fields reduced the populations and ranges of many state mammals, and 14 species were extirpated by 1900. An additional 15 species are either uncommon or rare today, and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources lists four species as endangered, three as threatened and ...


Awards And Recognition, Iowa Academy Of Science, 1998 Jan 1998

Awards And Recognition, Iowa Academy Of Science, 1998

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Editorial Board & Iowa Academy Of Science Officers And Directors Jan 1998

Editorial Board & Iowa Academy Of Science Officers And Directors

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Lack Of Genetic Variation In Cytochrome Bin A Population Of Smooth Softshell Turtles, David W. Weisrock, Tamara S. Haselkorn, Fredric J. Janzen Jan 1998

Lack Of Genetic Variation In Cytochrome Bin A Population Of Smooth Softshell Turtles, David W. Weisrock, Tamara S. Haselkorn, Fredric J. Janzen

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

An important issue in intraspecific molecular phylogenetic studies concerns distribution of genetic variation within and among populations and, hence, within-population sample sizes used in analyses. To address this sampling issue, we sequenced a 795 base pair (bp) segment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from 19 unrelated individuals from a Louisiana population of the smooth softshell turtle (Apalone mutica LeSueur). We found a complete lack of within-population variation in this large segment of mtDNA. This result supports the use of minimal within-population sample sizes in intraspecific molecular phylogenetic studies of Apalone using cytochrome b.


Cover - Table Of Contents Jan 1998

Cover - Table Of Contents

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Front Matter Jan 1998

Front Matter

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Iowa's Wetlands, Present And Future With A Focus On Prairie Potholes, R. A. Bishop, J. Joens, J. Zohrer Jan 1998

Iowa's Wetlands, Present And Future With A Focus On Prairie Potholes, R. A. Bishop, J. Joens, J. Zohrer

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

The vast prairie marsh-pothole complex that historically covered approximately 7 .6 millions acres in Iowa was reduced to less than 30,000 acres by 1980 when it was estimated that only 5,000 acres of prairie marsh and pothole habitat remained in private ownership. A bleak outlook for the future of wetlands was presented by Bishop (1981)." This outlook changed with the development of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan and the passage of two important pieces of legislation: the North American Wetlands Conservation Act and the Food Security Act of 1985. Protection of existing wetlands was afforded through the ...


Perspectives On Iowa's Declining Amphibians And Reptiles, James L. Christiansen Jan 1998

Perspectives On Iowa's Declining Amphibians And Reptiles, James L. Christiansen

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Changes in range and abundance of Iowa's amphibians and reptiles can be deduced by comparing records from recent studies with excellent collections from Iowa by Professor R. M. Bailey made from 1938-1943 in addition to museum records accumulated before 1950. Additional recent data make necessary this updating of a similar study conducted in 1980. The current study finds many of our frogs to be in decline, some in a pattern from north to south, but most as a diffused loss of populations, probably as a result of habitat destruction. The crawfish frog, one of the two frogs considered threatened ...


Back Cover Jan 1998

Back Cover

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Iowa's Declining Flora And Fauna: A Review Of Changes Since 1980 And An Outlook For The Future, Neil P. Bernstein Jan 1998

Iowa's Declining Flora And Fauna: A Review Of Changes Since 1980 And An Outlook For The Future, Neil P. Bernstein

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

The status of Iowa's biodiversity was first summarized at a 1980 Iowa Academy of Science (IAS) symposium that was published in The Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science (Vol. 88, No. 1) in 1981. The 1980 symposium was updated in a recent IAS symposium, and the proceedings from this symposium are published, for the most part, in volume 105 of this journal. Most of the authors noted some positive trends, but, overall, species declines and habitat destruction remained a concern.


Lithologic And Structural Interpretation Of Gravity Data, Northeastern Iowa, Curtiss J. Hella, Richard L. Kellogg Jan 1998

Lithologic And Structural Interpretation Of Gravity Data, Northeastern Iowa, Curtiss J. Hella, Richard L. Kellogg

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

A gravity survey was conducted over approximately 4600 square km of northeast Iowa. It was undertaken to provide detailed gravity coverage at approximately 1.6 km intervals and to model the source of several significant gravity and magnetic anomalies. 1,460 gravity stations were occupied in the survey area. Bouguer gravity and residual gravity anomaly maps were prepared, the latter using band-pass filter and trend-surface analysis techniques. The residual maps reveal that the large oval Bouguer gravity anomaly centered beneath Decorah can be traced to the southern border of the survey. Profiles crossing this feature were prepared from the Bouguer ...


Iowa's Avifauna: Recent Changes And Prospects For The Future, James J. Dinsmore Jan 1998

Iowa's Avifauna: Recent Changes And Prospects For The Future, James J. Dinsmore

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Iowa's avifauna has changed dramatically since 1980. The state list now has 40 additional species and totals 398 species, the most of any vertebrate group. Four species that had not previously nested in Iowa (Ring-billed Gull, Great-tailed Grackle, House Finch, Eurasian Tree Sparrow) and four whose nesting populations had disappeared (Double-crested Cormorant, Sandhill Crane, Piping Plover, Least Tern) now breed regularly here. Little Blue Heron, Cattle Egret, White-faced Ibis, Mississippi Kite, Prairie Warbler, and Red Crossbill nested for the first time but do not have established nesting populations. Trumpeter Swan, Peregrine Falcon, Greater Prairie Chicken, and Sharp-tailed Grouse have ...


Cover - Table Of Contents Jan 1998

Cover - Table Of Contents

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Front Matter Jan 1998

Front Matter

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.


Back Cover Jan 1998

Back Cover

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

No abstract provided.