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Plant Biology

2009

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Articles 1 - 30 of 85

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Joint Fire Science Program – Lake Mead National Recreation Area Revegetating Burned Arid Lands: Identifying Successful Native Species Using Trait And Competition Analysis: Quarterly Progress Report, Time Period: October 1 — December 31, 2009, Margaret N. Rees Dec 2009

Joint Fire Science Program – Lake Mead National Recreation Area Revegetating Burned Arid Lands: Identifying Successful Native Species Using Trait And Competition Analysis: Quarterly Progress Report, Time Period: October 1 — December 31, 2009, Margaret N. Rees

Fire Science

• Article accepted for publication in Journal of Arid Environments.

• Recharged irrigation gel packs for outplanting and watered seed plots at Goodsprings site.

• Completed full year of seed granivory trials at Goodsprings site.

• Presented information on this Task Agreement to 4th International Fire Ecology and Management Congress.

• Maintained nursery plots and added installment of nitrogen treatment.


Investigating Nectar Rhythms In Squash (Cucurbita Pepo): Effects On Honey Bee (Apis Mellifera) Foraging Behavior., Samuel David Boyd Dec 2009

Investigating Nectar Rhythms In Squash (Cucurbita Pepo): Effects On Honey Bee (Apis Mellifera) Foraging Behavior., Samuel David Boyd

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Experiments were performed to investigate the influence of water availability on the diel patterns of nectar secretion (volume, concentration, sugar production) in male squash flowers as well as to discover what physical component of nectar honey bees use to trigger their time-memory. Squash plants were grown in the greenhouse and in the field under both constant and variable watering regimes. Throughout anthesis, nectar volume and sugar concentration were recorded. In the field, the temporal distribution of arrivals to squash was observed with and without blossoms present. In the greenhouse and in the field, squash flowers exhibit a consistent diel pattern ...


Education In Plant Pathology Present Status And Future Challenges, James Macdonald, Caitilyn Allen, David Gadoury, William Jacobi, Segenet Kelemu, James Moyer, Tim Murray, Kevin Ong, Charles Pearson, John Sherwood, Ann Vidaver Dec 2009

Education In Plant Pathology Present Status And Future Challenges, James Macdonald, Caitilyn Allen, David Gadoury, William Jacobi, Segenet Kelemu, James Moyer, Tim Murray, Kevin Ong, Charles Pearson, John Sherwood, Ann Vidaver

Papers in Plant Pathology

Plant pathology is largely a mission driven discipline that seeks to increase the fundamental understanding of host–pathogen interactions and the etiology of plant diseases for the purpose of preventing or mitigating crop loss. This is an important mission because all nations face serious challenges in their efforts to prevent disease on plants cultivated for food, fiber, ornamental use, timber, and fuel, as well as those growing in native ecosystems. In 1994, it was estimated that global losses due to plant diseases ranged from 9.7 to 14.2% of potential yield (12).


Detection And Measurement Of Water Stress In Vegetation Using Visible Spectrum Reflectance, Arthur Zygielbaum Dec 2009

Detection And Measurement Of Water Stress In Vegetation Using Visible Spectrum Reflectance, Arthur Zygielbaum

Theses and Dissertations in Geography

At any scale, from a single microbe to the planet that nurtures us, water defines our place in the universe. It provides the hydraulic forces needed to give plants structure, and the medium enabling photosynthesis, the basis for most life on Earth, to occur. Knowledge of plant water status is vital to understanding the state or condition of vegetation, information which is essential to disciplines as diverse as agriculture, geography, and climatology. Non-destructive and remote sensing of plant water status allows the gathering of such information across wide geographic extents and over long periods of time. Monitoring vegetation remotely requires ...


Temperature Compensation Of Auxin Dependent Developmental Patterning, Nicholas J. Kaplinsky Dec 2009

Temperature Compensation Of Auxin Dependent Developmental Patterning, Nicholas J. Kaplinsky

Biology Faculty Works

The establishment of localized auxin gradients plays a central role in developmental patterning in plants. Auxin levels and responses have been shown to increase with temperature although developmental patterning is not affected. This suggests the existence of a homeostatic mechanism that ensures that patterning occurs normally over a range of temperatures. We recently described the cloning and characterization of BOBBER1 (BOB1), an Arabidopsis gene which encodes a small heat shock protein. BOB1 is required for the establishment of auxin gradients and for normal developmental patterning. BOB1 is also required for organismal thermotolerance and localizes to heat shock granules at elevated ...


Techniques For Triggering Germination Of Adenostoma Fasciculatum In Revegetation Projects At Rocky Canyon Quarry, Stephanie B. Scolari Dec 2009

Techniques For Triggering Germination Of Adenostoma Fasciculatum In Revegetation Projects At Rocky Canyon Quarry, Stephanie B. Scolari

Master's Theses

Rocky Canyon Quarry is a granite mine located in the Santa Lucia Mountains about 5 miles southeast of the city of Atascadero. The Surface Mining and Reclamation Act (SMARA), which passed in 1975, dictates that California mines must rehabilitate lands disturbed by mining operations. Dr. V. L. Holland and his students in the Biological Sciences Department at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly) have been working on restoration and revegetation of the Rocky Canyon Quarry since the early 1990’s.

Adenostoma fasciculatum (chamise) dominates the chaparral communities (chamisal chaparral) found in Rocky Canyon. Chamise is the most ...


Seed Dispersal And Reproduction Patterns Among Everglades Plants, Ronald E. Mossman Nov 2009

Seed Dispersal And Reproduction Patterns Among Everglades Plants, Ronald E. Mossman

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

In this study three aspects of sexual reproduction in Everglades plants were examined to more clearly understand seed dispersal and the allocation of resources to sexual reproduction— spatial dispersal process, temporal dispersal of seeds (seedbank), and germination patterns in the dominant species, sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense). Community assembly rules for fruit dispersal were deduced by analysis of functional traits associated with this process. Seedbank ecology was investigated by monitoring emergence of germinants from sawgrass soil samples held under varying water depths to determine the fate of dispersed seeds. Fine-scale study of sawgrass fruits yielded information on contributions to variation in sexually ...


Responses Of Plants In Polar Regions To Uvb Exposure : A Meta-Analysis, K. K. Newsham, Sharon A. Robinson Nov 2009

Responses Of Plants In Polar Regions To Uvb Exposure : A Meta-Analysis, K. K. Newsham, Sharon A. Robinson

Sharon Robinson

We report a meta-analysis of data from 34 field studies into the effects of UV-B radiation on Arctic and Antarctic bryophytes and angiosperms. The studies measured plant responses to decreases in UV-B radiation under screens, natural fluctuations in UV-B irradiance, or increases in UV-B radiation applied from fluorescent UV lamps. Exposure to UV-B radiation was found to increase the concentrations of UV-B absorbing compounds in leaves or thalli by 7% and 25% (expressed on a mass or area basis, respectively). UV-B exposure also reduced aboveground biomass and plant height by 15% and 10%, respectively, and increased DNA damage by 90 ...


Loss Of Rna–Dependent Rna Polymerase 2 (Rdr2) Function Causes Widespread And Unexpected Changes In The Expression Of Transposons, Genes, And 24-Nt Small Rnas, Yi Jia, Damon R. Lisch, Kazuhiro Ohtsu, Michael J. Scanlon, Dan Nettleton, Patrick S. Schnable Nov 2009

Loss Of Rna–Dependent Rna Polymerase 2 (Rdr2) Function Causes Widespread And Unexpected Changes In The Expression Of Transposons, Genes, And 24-Nt Small Rnas, Yi Jia, Damon R. Lisch, Kazuhiro Ohtsu, Michael J. Scanlon, Dan Nettleton, Patrick S. Schnable

Statistics Publications

Transposable elements (TEs) comprise a substantial portion of many eukaryotic genomes and are typically transcriptionally silenced. RNA–dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2) is a component of the RNA–directed DNA methylation (RdDM) silencing pathway. In maize, loss of mediator of paramutation1 (mop1) encoded RDR2 function results in reactivation of transcriptionally silenced Mu transposons and a substantial reduction in the accumulation of 24 nt short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that recruit RNA silencing components. An RNA–seq experiment conducted on shoot apical meristems (SAMs) revealed that, as expected based on a model in which RDR2 generates 24 nt siRNAs that suppress expression, most ...


Review Of The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year-Round Vegetable Production Using Deep-Organic Techniques And Unheated Greenhouses, Madeleine K. Charney Oct 2009

Review Of The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year-Round Vegetable Production Using Deep-Organic Techniques And Unheated Greenhouses, Madeleine K. Charney

University Libraries Publication Series

No abstract provided.


Sex-Specific Variation In The Interaction Between Distichlis Spicata (Poaceae) And Mycorrhizal Fungi, Sarah M. Eppley, Charlene Ashley Mercer, Christian Haaning, Camille Brianne Graves Oct 2009

Sex-Specific Variation In The Interaction Between Distichlis Spicata (Poaceae) And Mycorrhizal Fungi, Sarah M. Eppley, Charlene Ashley Mercer, Christian Haaning, Camille Brianne Graves

Biology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Associations between mycorrhizal fungi and plants can influence intraspecific competition and shape plant population structure. While variation in plant genotypes is known to affect mycorrhizal colonization in crop systems, little is known about how genotypes affect colonization in natural plant populations or how plant sex might influence colonization with mycorrhizal fungi in plant species with dimorphic sexual systems. In this study, we analyzed mycorrhizal colonization in males and females of the wetland dioecious grass Distichlis spicata, which has spatially segregated sexes. Our results suggest that D. spicata males and females interact with mycorrhizal fungi differently. We discuss the implications for ...


Joint Fire Science Program – Lake Mead National Recreation Area Revegetating Burned Arid Lands: Identifying Successful Native Species Using Trait And Competition Analysis: Quarterly Progress Report, Time Period: July 1 — September 30, 2009, Margaret N. Rees Sep 2009

Joint Fire Science Program – Lake Mead National Recreation Area Revegetating Burned Arid Lands: Identifying Successful Native Species Using Trait And Competition Analysis: Quarterly Progress Report, Time Period: July 1 — September 30, 2009, Margaret N. Rees

Fire Science

  • Weighed biomass for competitive hierarchy study.
  • Completed more seed granivory trials at Goodsprings.
  • Monitored and maintained nursery plots.
  • Submitted revised article to Journal of Arid Environments.


Bobber1 Is A Noncanonical Arabidopsis Small Heat Shock Protein Required For Both Development And Thermotolerance, Dahlia Erin Perez , '08, J. S. Hoyer, Ayanna Iman Johnson , '09, Zachary Ray Moody , '07, J. Lopez, Nicholas J. Kaplinsky Sep 2009

Bobber1 Is A Noncanonical Arabidopsis Small Heat Shock Protein Required For Both Development And Thermotolerance, Dahlia Erin Perez , '08, J. S. Hoyer, Ayanna Iman Johnson , '09, Zachary Ray Moody , '07, J. Lopez, Nicholas J. Kaplinsky

Biology Faculty Works

Plants have evolved a range of cellular responses to maintain developmental homeostasis and to survive over a range of temperatures. Here, we describe the in vivo and in vitro functions of BOBBER1 (BOB1), a NudC domain containing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) small heat shock protein. BOB1 is an essential gene required for the normal partitioning and patterning of the apical domain of the Arabidopsis embryo. Because BOB1 loss-of-function mutants are embryo lethal, we used a partial loss-of-function allele (bob1-3) to demonstrate that BOB1 is required for organismal thermotolerance and postembryonic development. Recombinant BOB1 protein functions as a molecular chaperone and prevents ...


Triticum Mosaic Virus: A Distinct Member Of The Family Potyviridae With An Unusually Long Leader Sequence, Satyanarayana Tatineni, Amy D. Ziems, Stephen N. Wegulo, Roy French Aug 2009

Triticum Mosaic Virus: A Distinct Member Of The Family Potyviridae With An Unusually Long Leader Sequence, Satyanarayana Tatineni, Amy D. Ziems, Stephen N. Wegulo, Roy French

Papers in Plant Pathology

The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a member in the family Potyviridae, has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides (nt) excluding the 3′ polyadenylated tail. The genome encodes a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids with the “hall-mark proteins” of potyviruses, including a small overlapping gene, PIPO, in the P3 cistron. The genome of TriMV has an unusually long 5′ nontranslated region of 739 nt with 12 translation initiation codons and three small open reading frames, which resemble those of the internal ribosome entry site containing 5′ leader sequences of the members of Picornaviridae. Pairwise ...


Twisted Whorls - 2009, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth Jul 2009

Twisted Whorls - 2009, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth

Integrated Crop Management News

Pale yellow upper corn leaves abound across Iowa as corn enters the teens of growth stages with some tasseling. These once sun-starved leaves entrapped in the whorl by more mature leaves will wave for a day or more above rapidly growing crop canopies before turning green. Although incidences seem more numerous than in other years, the symptom is not unusual. We reported on it last year occurring at about the same growth stages – tenth to twelfth leaf - and have an article posted on our website that discusses earlier-season situations.


An Oral History Of The American Chestnut In Southern Appalachia Presentation, Bethany N. Baxter Jul 2009

An Oral History Of The American Chestnut In Southern Appalachia Presentation, Bethany N. Baxter

American Chestnut Oral History Project

Bethany Baxter's defense presentation for the thesis entitled, An oral history of the American chestnut in Southern Appalachia, submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.


Partitioning The Apical Domain Of The Arabidopsis Embryo Requires The Bobber1 Nudc Domain Protein, R. J. Jurkuta, Nicholas J. Kaplinsky, Jennifer Elizabeth Spindel , '10, M. K. Barton Jul 2009

Partitioning The Apical Domain Of The Arabidopsis Embryo Requires The Bobber1 Nudc Domain Protein, R. J. Jurkuta, Nicholas J. Kaplinsky, Jennifer Elizabeth Spindel , '10, M. K. Barton

Biology Faculty Works

The apical domain of the embryo is partitioned into distinct regions that will give rise to the cotyledons and the shoot apical meristem. In this article, we describe a novel screen to identify Arabidopsis thaliana embryo arrest mutants that are defective in this partitioning, and we describe the phenotype of one such mutant, bobber1. bobber1 mutants arrest at the globular stage of development, they express the meristem-specific SHOOTMERISTEMLESS gene throughout the top half of the embryo, and they fail to express the AINTEGUMENTA transcript normally found in cotyledons. Thus, BOBBER1 is required to limit the extent of the meristem domain ...


Joint Fire Science Program – Lake Mead National Recreation Area: Revegetating Burned Arid Lands: Identifying Successful Native Species Using Trait And Competition Analysis, Quarterly Progress Report, April 1 — June 30, 2009, Margaret N. Rees Jun 2009

Joint Fire Science Program – Lake Mead National Recreation Area: Revegetating Burned Arid Lands: Identifying Successful Native Species Using Trait And Competition Analysis, Quarterly Progress Report, April 1 — June 30, 2009, Margaret N. Rees

Fire Science

  • Initiated a competitive hierarchy study.
  • Monitored and maintained outplanting at Goodsprings.
  • Completed more seed granivory trials at Goodsprings.
  • Mentored student to completion of undergraduate research project.
  • Monitored and maintained nursery plots.
  • Revising article submitted to Journal of Arid Environments.


A Nonsense Mutation In A Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Is Responsible For The Sorghum Brown Midrib6 Phenotype1[W][Oa], Scott E. Sattler, Aaron J. Saathoff, Eric J. Haas, Nathan A. Palmer, Deanna L. Funnell-Harris, Gautam Sarath, Jeffrey F. Pedersen Jun 2009

A Nonsense Mutation In A Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene Is Responsible For The Sorghum Brown Midrib6 Phenotype1[W][Oa], Scott E. Sattler, Aaron J. Saathoff, Eric J. Haas, Nathan A. Palmer, Deanna L. Funnell-Harris, Gautam Sarath, Jeffrey F. Pedersen

Papers in Plant Pathology

brown midrib6 (bmr6) affects phenylpropanoid metabolism, resulting in reduced lignin concentrations and altered lignin composition in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Recently, bmr6 plants were shown to have limited cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195), the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of hydroxycinnamoyl aldehydes (monolignals) to monolignols. A candidate gene approach was taken to identify Bmr6. Two CAD genes (Sb02g024190 and Sb04g005950) were identified in the sorghum genome based on similarity to known CAD genes and through DNA sequencing a nonsense mutation was discovered in Sb04g005950 that results in a truncated protein lacking the NADPH-binding and C-terminal catalytic ...


High-Throughput Linkage Analysis Of Mutator Insertion Sites In Maize, Gibum Yi, Diane Luth, Timothy D. Goodman, Carolyn J. Lawrence, Philip W. Becraft Jun 2009

High-Throughput Linkage Analysis Of Mutator Insertion Sites In Maize, Gibum Yi, Diane Luth, Timothy D. Goodman, Carolyn J. Lawrence, Philip W. Becraft

Genetics, Development and Cell Biology Publications

Insertional mutagenesis is a cornerstone of functional genomics. High-copy transposable element systems such as Mutator (Mu) in maize (Zea mays) afford the advantage of high forward mutation rates but pose a challenge for identifying the particular element responsible for a given mutation. Several large mutant collections have been generated in Mu-active genetic stocks, but current methods limit the ability to rapidly identify the causal Mu insertions. Here we present a method to rapidly assay Mu insertions that are genetically linked to a mutation of interest. The method combines elements of MuTAIL (thermal asymmetrically interlaced) and amplification of insertion mutagenized ...


Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Allow Reduced Application Rates Of Chemical Fertilizers, A. O. Adesemoye, H. A. Torbert, J. W. Kloepper May 2009

Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Allow Reduced Application Rates Of Chemical Fertilizers, A. O. Adesemoye, H. A. Torbert, J. W. Kloepper

Papers in Plant Pathology

The search for microorganisms that improve soil fertility and enhance plant nutrition has continued to attract attention due to the increasing cost of fertilizers and some of their negative environmental impacts. The objectives of this greenhouse study with tomato were to determine (1) if reduced rates of inorganic fertilizer coupled with microbial inoculants will produce plant growth, yield, and nutrient uptake levels equivalent to those with full rates of the fertilizer and (2) the minimum level to which fertilizer could be reduced when inoculants were used. The microbial inoculants used in the study were a mixture of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria ...


Investigation Of Plant Water Use In The Great Basin, Nv, Benjamin Conrad May 2009

Investigation Of Plant Water Use In The Great Basin, Nv, Benjamin Conrad

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Global climate change in addition to a growing population can have a strong impact on our natural resources. In particular, cities in the semi-arid and arid southwestern US are currently faced with the challenge of providing sustainable fresh water to a growing population. In Las Vegas, dwindling water levels in Lake Mead have forced water managers to seek water resources from Spring Valley and Snake Valley, NV, which are located 402 km north of the city. The goals of this research were to investigate the water use of shrubs located in these valleys by using a large aperture scintillometer (LAS ...


Multicellular Secretory Trichome Development On Soybean And Related Glycine Gynoecia, R. A. Healy, R. G. Palmer, Harry T. Horner May 2009

Multicellular Secretory Trichome Development On Soybean And Related Glycine Gynoecia, R. A. Healy, R. G. Palmer, Harry T. Horner

Genetics, Development and Cell Biology Publications

Multicellular glandular trichomes form on gynoecia of wild annual Glycine species, annual soybean cultivars, and wild perennial Glycine species. These trichomes occur from the ovary base to the style base and, in perennial species, along the style as well.Trichomes form at least 2 d before anthesis, and new trichomes develop throughout flowering and also on young seed pods. Trichome structure is similar in all taxa examined, usually five to seven linearly arranged cells. Stalk cells with callose walls become highly vacuolate, and their cytoplasms have reduced numbers of Golgi bodies and endoplasmic reticulum. During secretion, two to four distal ...


Hunker Down And Hold On: Contractile Roots Give Skunk Cabbage Another Special Trait, W. John Hayden Apr 2009

Hunker Down And Hold On: Contractile Roots Give Skunk Cabbage Another Special Trait, W. John Hayden

Biology Faculty Publications

I can remember the first time I ever heard of contractile roots. It was in graduate school at the University of Maryland and a friend of mine was busy preparing a lecture on roots. He said to me something like “Did you ever notice, while pulling up dandelions, that the darn weed seems to be pulling back? As it turns out, it is!” Strange but true, dandelions, along with a diverse assemblage of other species, have contractile roots that serve to pull the plant downward. In this capacity, contractile roots go well beyond the routine function of providing anchorage for ...


Impacts Of Plant Size, Density, Herbivory, And Desease On Native Platte Thistle (Cirsium Canescens), Deidra Jacobsen Apr 2009

Impacts Of Plant Size, Density, Herbivory, And Desease On Native Platte Thistle (Cirsium Canescens), Deidra Jacobsen

Environmental Studies Undergraduate Student Theses

Abstract. Based on prior field observations, we hypothesized that individual and interacting effects of plant size, density, insect herbivory, and especially fungal disease, influenced seedling and juvenile plant growth in native Platte thistle populations (Cirsium canescens Nutt.). We worked at Arapaho Prairie in the Nebraska Sandhills (May - August 2007), monitoring plant growth, insect damage, and fungal infection within different density thistle patches. In the main experiment, we sprayed half of test plants in different density patches with fungicide (Fungonil© Bonide, containing chlorothalonil) and half with a water control. Fungal infection rates were very low, so we found no difference in ...


Joint Fire Science Program – Lake Mead National Recreation Area: Revegetating Burned Arid Lands: Identifying Successful Native Species Using Trait And Competition Analysis, Quarterly Progress Report, January 1— March 31, 2009, Margaret N. Rees Mar 2009

Joint Fire Science Program – Lake Mead National Recreation Area: Revegetating Burned Arid Lands: Identifying Successful Native Species Using Trait And Competition Analysis, Quarterly Progress Report, January 1— March 31, 2009, Margaret N. Rees

Fire Science

• Monitored and watered native plants in nursery plots.

• Exotic grasses seeded into nursery plots.

• Nitrogen treatment applied to nursery plots.

• Granivory study trials performed each month and corresponding abstract submitted to ESA.

• Competitive hierarchy study germination trials are underway.

• Monitored seeding and outplanting experiments at Goodsprings.

• Submitted article to Mojave Applied Ecology Notes newsletter updating on JFS work.

• Mentoring UNLV undergraduate student in research project for ENV 492.

• Prepared presentation materials for two scientific meetings.


Quantification Of Ferritin From Staple Food Crops, Rebbecca J. Lukac, Maneesha R. Aluru, Manju B. Reddy Mar 2009

Quantification Of Ferritin From Staple Food Crops, Rebbecca J. Lukac, Maneesha R. Aluru, Manju B. Reddy

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Ferritin-iron has been shown to be as bioavailable as ferrous sulfate in humans. Thus, biofortification to breed crops with high ferritin content is a promising strategy to alleviate the global iron deficiency problem. Although ferritin is present in all food crops, its concentration varies between species and varieties. Therefore, a successful ferritin biofortification strategy requires a method to rapidly measure ferritin concentrations in food crops. The objective of this study was to develop a simple and reliable ELISA using an anti-ferritin polyclonal antibody to detect ferritin in various crops. Crude seed extracts were found to have 10.2 +/- 1.0 ...


First Report Of Columbia Root-Knot Nematode (Meloidogyne Chitwoodi) In Potato In Turkey, A. Ozarslandan, Z. Devran, N. Mutlu, I. H. Elekcioglu Mar 2009

First Report Of Columbia Root-Knot Nematode (Meloidogyne Chitwoodi) In Potato In Turkey, A. Ozarslandan, Z. Devran, N. Mutlu, I. H. Elekcioglu

Papers in Plant Pathology

Columbia root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne chitwoodi Golden et al., was identified from potatoes, Solanum tuberosum L., collected from Nigde Province, Turkey in September 2006. Seed potatoes are the most likely source for this introduction. The nematode is currently found to be infecting potatoes grown in the Netherlands, Portugal, Belgium, Germany, the United States, Mexico, South Africa, and Argentina. M. chitwoodi acquired a quarantine status in Europe (1) because of its potential to become established worldwide and its high damage probability. Some countries prohibit import of both seed and table stock potatoes originating in states known to harbor M. chitwoodi. Lesions on ...


Crop Updates 2009 - Cereals, Jeff Baldock, Doug Edmeades, Mark Seymour, Paul Carmody, Ian Pritchard, Alan Meldrum, Michael Robertson, Roger Lawes, Rob Sands, Peter White, Felicity Byrne, Andrew Bathgate, Kedar Adhikari, Tanveer Khan, Stuart Morgan, Alan Harris, P. Gaur, K. M. H. Siddique, H. Clarke, N. C. Turner, W. Macleod, S. Morgan, Chris Veitch, Tony Leonforte, Kith Jayasena, Geoff Thomas, Rob Loughman, Kazue Tanaka, Ravjit Khangura, M. Amjad, Richard Oliver, Dusty Severtson, Peter Mangano, John Botha, Brenda Coutts, Manisha Shankar, Kasia Rybak, Michael Baker, Andrea Hills, Shahajahan Miyan, Peter Portmann, Nicole Rice, Robert Henry, Jeff J. Russell, B. H. Paynter, Linda Price, Brenda Shackley, Vicki Scanlan, Darshan Sharma, Christine Zaicou-Kunesch Feb 2009

Crop Updates 2009 - Cereals, Jeff Baldock, Doug Edmeades, Mark Seymour, Paul Carmody, Ian Pritchard, Alan Meldrum, Michael Robertson, Roger Lawes, Rob Sands, Peter White, Felicity Byrne, Andrew Bathgate, Kedar Adhikari, Tanveer Khan, Stuart Morgan, Alan Harris, P. Gaur, K. M. H. Siddique, H. Clarke, N. C. Turner, W. Macleod, S. Morgan, Chris Veitch, Tony Leonforte, Kith Jayasena, Geoff Thomas, Rob Loughman, Kazue Tanaka, Ravjit Khangura, M. Amjad, Richard Oliver, Dusty Severtson, Peter Mangano, John Botha, Brenda Coutts, Manisha Shankar, Kasia Rybak, Michael Baker, Andrea Hills, Shahajahan Miyan, Peter Portmann, Nicole Rice, Robert Henry, Jeff J. Russell, B. H. Paynter, Linda Price, Brenda Shackley, Vicki Scanlan, Darshan Sharma, Christine Zaicou-Kunesch

Crop Updates

This session covers twenty seven papers from different authors:

PLENARY

1. Building soil carbon for productivity and implications for carbon accounting, Jeff Baldock, CSIRO Land and Water, Adelaide, SA

2. Fact or Fiction: Who is telling the truth and how to tell the difference, Doug Edmeades, agKnowledge Ltd, Hamilton

3. Four decades of crop sequence trials in Western Australia, Mark Seymour,Department of Agriculture and Food

BREAK CROPS

4. 2008 Break Crops survey Report, Paul Carmody,Development Officer, Department of Agriculture and Food

5. Attitudes of Western Australian wheatbelt growers to ‘Break Crops’, Paul Carmody and Ian Pritchard, Development Officers ...


Crop Updates 2009 - Weeds, Catherine Borger, Abul Hashem, Mike Clarke, Aik Cheam, Michael Walsh, Harmohinder Dhammu, Vince Lambert, Chris Roberts, Russell Quartermaine, David Nicholson, Mike Jackson, Bill Campbell, John Moore, Mario D'Antuono, Paul Matson, Peter Newman, Sally Peltzer, Dave Minkey, Stephen B. Powles, Qin Yu, Mechelle Owen, Roberto Busi, Sudheesh Manalil, Leigh Smith, Peter White, Fiona Evans, Art Diggle, Catherine Borger, Pippa Michael, Siew Lee, Rob Grima, Glenn Adam, Trevor Bell, Steve Davies, Glen Riethmuller Feb 2009

Crop Updates 2009 - Weeds, Catherine Borger, Abul Hashem, Mike Clarke, Aik Cheam, Michael Walsh, Harmohinder Dhammu, Vince Lambert, Chris Roberts, Russell Quartermaine, David Nicholson, Mike Jackson, Bill Campbell, John Moore, Mario D'Antuono, Paul Matson, Peter Newman, Sally Peltzer, Dave Minkey, Stephen B. Powles, Qin Yu, Mechelle Owen, Roberto Busi, Sudheesh Manalil, Leigh Smith, Peter White, Fiona Evans, Art Diggle, Catherine Borger, Pippa Michael, Siew Lee, Rob Grima, Glenn Adam, Trevor Bell, Steve Davies, Glen Riethmuller

Crop Updates

This session covers twenty three papers from different authors:

Herbicides

1. New pre-seeding grass selective herbicides – How well do they work in zero or no-till systems? Dr Catherine Borgerand Dr Abul Hashem, Department of Agriculture and Food

2. Velocity®—An alternate mode of action for the control of wild radish in cereals, Mike Clarke, Bayer Cropscience Pty Ltd, Dr Aik Cheam, Department of Agriculture and Food, Dr Michael Walsh, WAHRI, University of Western Australia

3. Herbicide tolerance of new barley varieties, Harmohinder Dhammu, Vince Lambert, Chris Roberts and Russell Quartermaine, Department of Agriculture and Food

4. Herbicide tolerance of Desi ...