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Plant Biology

1979

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Articles 1 - 24 of 24

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Morphology And Distribution Of Petiolar Nectaries In Ipomoea (Convolvulaceae), Kathleen H. Keeler, Robert B. Kaul Sep 1979

Morphology And Distribution Of Petiolar Nectaries In Ipomoea (Convolvulaceae), Kathleen H. Keeler, Robert B. Kaul

Faculty Publications in the Biological Sciences

The distribution of petiolar nectaries in 24 species of Ipomoea was investigated. Petiolar nectaries were found on 12 species (8 new reports, 4 confirmations of previous reports) and quoted from the literature as being found on 3 other species; they were absent from 9 species investigated. The structure of petiolar nectaries in the genus ranges from simple beds of superficial nectar-secreting trichomes (1 species), to slightly recessed "basin nectaries" (8 species), to "crypt nectaries," which are structurally the most complex extrafloral nectaries known (3 species). (Structures were not determined for 3 species.) Petiolar nectaries are present in all subgenera, but ...


Plant Response To The Barstow To Las Vegas Motorcycle Race Of November, 1974, Candace E. Horsley Aug 1979

Plant Response To The Barstow To Las Vegas Motorcycle Race Of November, 1974, Candace E. Horsley

Loma Linda University Electronic Theses, Dissertations & Projects

The purpose of this study was to determine the disturbance spectrum of the perennial plant vegetation by the Barstow to Las Vegas motorcycle race. Transects were taken at the pit area, starting line, and at various locations along the race course. Measurements were also taken in undisturbed control sites near the test areas, the topographic and bio tic features being judged as equal. Methods employed consisted of aerial photograph analysis just before and after the race. On site ground measurements were taken four years after the 1974 motorocycle event. Measurements of diversity, stability, productivity, and community quality were calculated. The ...


Distribution Of Plants With Extrafloral Nectaries And Ants At Two Elevations In Jamaica, Kathleen H. Keeler Jun 1979

Distribution Of Plants With Extrafloral Nectaries And Ants At Two Elevations In Jamaica, Kathleen H. Keeler

Faculty Publications in the Biological Sciences

Frequencies of plants with extrafloral nectaries were determined for two elevations in Jamaica. Extrafloral nectaries were found on 0.28 of the plants at sea level (Happy Grove, Portland) and 0.00 of the plants at 1310 m (Whitfield Hall, St. Thomas). Ant abundance, as indicated by discovery of and recruitment to baits, was greater at the lower elevation site. However, despite the apparent absence of plants with extrafloral nectaries, there were abundant ants at 1310 m.


The Effects Of Two Polychlorinated Biphenyls (Aroclor 1016r And Aroclor 1242r) On The Growth And Chlorophyll Production Of Cultures Of Selenastrum Capricornutum, Jude William Grosser May 1979

The Effects Of Two Polychlorinated Biphenyls (Aroclor 1016r And Aroclor 1242r) On The Growth And Chlorophyll Production Of Cultures Of Selenastrum Capricornutum, Jude William Grosser

Morehead State Theses and Dissertations

A thesis presented to the faculty of the School of Sciences and Mathematics at Morehead State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Science by Jude William Grosser on May 11, 1979.


Ecotypic Differentiation Of Andropogon Virginicus L. In Relation To Strip Mine Spoil Banks, Valina Kay Hurt May 1979

Ecotypic Differentiation Of Andropogon Virginicus L. In Relation To Strip Mine Spoil Banks, Valina Kay Hurt

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

Reciprocal plantings of populations of broomsedge, taken from an abandoned strip mine and from an abandoned farm plot in south central Kentucky, on strip mine spoil and abandoned field soil resulted in patterns of populations differentiation. Clonal plantings of populations from strip mine habitats and old field development appeared equal in height and biomass when grown on old field soils in both field trials and growth chamber studies. Populations when planted in strip mine soils in field trials and controlled growth experiments. Later flowering in strip mine populations may be a key to survival strategy in the harsh microclimates of ...


A Taxonomic & Physiographic Survey Of Scirpus In Kentucky With Problem Species Complex Analysis, Sally Arnold May 1979

A Taxonomic & Physiographic Survey Of Scirpus In Kentucky With Problem Species Complex Analysis, Sally Arnold

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

The genus Scirpus was analyzed according to species occurrence and physiographic distribution in the State of Kentucky. The morphology of three taxonomic problem complexes, Scirpus atrovirens-georgianus, Scirpus validus-acutus, and Scirpus cyperinus-eriophorum-pelius-pedicellatus was evaluated to determine whether or not their components are distinct among the Kentucky specimens. Remaining taxa were likewise evaluated and identified. A key to Scirpus in Kentucky and a taxonomic treatment are presented.


Species With Extrafloral Nectaries In A Temperate Flora (Nebraska), Kathleen H. Keeler Mar 1979

Species With Extrafloral Nectaries In A Temperate Flora (Nebraska), Kathleen H. Keeler

Faculty Publications in the Biological Sciences

Extrafloral nectaries (EFNs) are glands on a plant, not involved in pollination, that produce solutions containing sugars (and other compounds). Long noted by morphologists, EFNs have recently been observed to be part of ant-plant mutualisms. The function of EFNs appears to be to attract aggressive insects, especially ants, which by disturbing or preying upon herbivores, reduce damage to the plant (Janzen, 1966a,b; Elias and Gelband, 1975; Keeler, 1975, 1977; Bentley, 1976, 1977a,b; Schemske, 1978; Tilman, 1978; Inouye and Taylor, 1979; Pickett ad Clark, 1979). Furthermore, they constitute an unusual plant defense against herbivores: at EFNs plants employ ants ...


Winter 1979, John Tristan, Joe Don Boyd, Fred P. Miller, K. A. Hurto, Pat Kristy, Joseph Troll Jan 1979

Winter 1979, John Tristan, Joe Don Boyd, Fred P. Miller, K. A. Hurto, Pat Kristy, Joseph Troll

Turf Bulletin

  1. Clubhouse Plants (page 3)
  2. Massachusetts Pesticide News (6)
  3. The Alsea Report on 2,4,5-T (8)
  4. Better Pest Control (10)
  5. Acid Rain: Something Else to Worry About? (11)
  6. UMass Turfgrass Research Update (13)
  7. 1979 Preemergence Crabgrass Control Trial


Fall 1979, Walter C. Shortle, Jeff Cox, Francis W. Holmes, Clifford S. Chater, Anthony Decrosta Jan 1979

Fall 1979, Walter C. Shortle, Jeff Cox, Francis W. Holmes, Clifford S. Chater, Anthony Decrosta

Turf Bulletin

  1. New Ideas in Tree Care (page 3)
  2. 'Wonder Water' (6)
  3. Herbicides: Are They Safe? (9)
  4. University of Massachusetts Turfgrass Field Day (10)
  5. The Shade Tree Laboratories of Massachusetts--Origin and Public Services (11)
  6. Do Pesticides Cause Allergies (14)
  7. Federal Noxious Weed Act Funded (18)
  8. Your Opinion Please (18)


Summer 1979, Joseph Troll, K. A. Hurto Jan 1979

Summer 1979, Joseph Troll, K. A. Hurto

Turf Bulletin

  1. Fertilizer Programs for Bluegrass and Ryegrasses (page 3)
  2. Turfgrass Slide Sets Available (6)
  3. Seed Extracts Repel Japanese Beetles (8)
  4. Principles of Turfgrass Weed Control (10)
  5. How Regulation is Impacting on Pesticide Research (12)
  6. UMass Turfgrass Research Fund (20)
  7. UMass Turfgrass Research Field Day (20)


Spring 1979 Conference Issue, K. A. Hurto, Alfred W. Boicourt, W. A. Sinclair, E. S. Pira Jan 1979

Spring 1979 Conference Issue, K. A. Hurto, Alfred W. Boicourt, W. A. Sinclair, E. S. Pira

Turf Bulletin

  1. Principles of Turfgrass Weed Control Annual Grasses (page 3)
  2. Bean-Shape Islands (7)
  3. High Protein Food From Grass (8)
  4. Forty-Eighth Annual Turf Conference and Third Industrial Show Program (10)
  5. "Dutch Elm Disease: Perspectives After 60 Years" (13)
  6. Toro Irrigation Design Seminar (14)
  7. Ideas: New and Old (15)
  8. More Pesticide Exams (16)
  9. Disposal of Pesticides in Massachusetts (18)
  10. Moth Controls Nutsedge Weeds (19)
  11. New Pesticide Bill (20)


Aluminum Toxicity And Root Dna Synthesis In Wheat, Susan Ellen Ulmer Jan 1979

Aluminum Toxicity And Root Dna Synthesis In Wheat, Susan Ellen Ulmer

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

No abstract provided.


Soil-Moisture Stress Effects On Reproductive And Vegetative Components Of Soybeans, Mohammad-Mehdi Karimi-Abdachi Jan 1979

Soil-Moisture Stress Effects On Reproductive And Vegetative Components Of Soybeans, Mohammad-Mehdi Karimi-Abdachi

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

No abstract provided.


Root Anatomy Of Fine Species Of Abronia From Southern California And Its Ecological Implications, Jan Webster Jan 1979

Root Anatomy Of Fine Species Of Abronia From Southern California And Its Ecological Implications, Jan Webster

Theses Digitization Project

No abstract provided.


The Effects Of Selected Pre-Germination Treatments On Six Species Of Summer And Winter Annual Plants Of The East Mojave Desert, James R. Earsom Jan 1979

The Effects Of Selected Pre-Germination Treatments On Six Species Of Summer And Winter Annual Plants Of The East Mojave Desert, James R. Earsom

Theses Digitization Project

No abstract provided.


Oxygen And Carbon Dioxide Effects On The Photosynthetic And Photorespiratory Carbon Pools In Glycine Max, William D. Hitz Jan 1979

Oxygen And Carbon Dioxide Effects On The Photosynthetic And Photorespiratory Carbon Pools In Glycine Max, William D. Hitz

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

No abstract provided.


Nocturnal Pollination Of Abronia Fragrans (Nyctaginaceae), Kathleen H. Keeler Jan 1979

Nocturnal Pollination Of Abronia Fragrans (Nyctaginaceae), Kathleen H. Keeler

Faculty Publications in the Biological Sciences

Abronia fragrans Nutt. (Nyctaginaceae) is a white-flowered herb of dry sandy soils from Idaho and South Dakota to Arizona and Texas. It can be readily observed to fit a night-blooming, moth-pollinated syndrome (Faegri and van der Pijl, The principle of pollination ecology, 1971). This does not seem to have been noted: in all references to A. fragrans we could find, the only indication of nocturnal anthesis was the comment of Nelson (Handbook of Rocky Mountain plants, 1969), who observed that the fragrance was more noticeable at night. Tillett (Brittonia 19:299-327, 1967), working on Pacific species, suggested that the pink ...


Physiological Characters In Maize (Zea Mays L.) And Their Relationship To Stalk Rot, Hashem Moustafa Soliman Jan 1979

Physiological Characters In Maize (Zea Mays L.) And Their Relationship To Stalk Rot, Hashem Moustafa Soliman

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

No abstract provided.


Perennial Pasture Measures Up, D A. Nicholas Jan 1979

Perennial Pasture Measures Up, D A. Nicholas

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

In a trial at Manjimup, a pasture based on the perennial grass, Currie cocksfoot, gave substantially more production than a comparable annual pasture.


Ryegrass Toxicity Organism Found On Other Grasses, D L. Chatel, J. L. Wise, A. G. Marfleet Jan 1979

Ryegrass Toxicity Organism Found On Other Grasses, D L. Chatel, J. L. Wise, A. G. Marfleet

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Yellow slime disease caused by Corynebacterium sp. has recently been found in three grass species.

The diseased grasses were found in the field growing with each other and with affected toxic annual ryegrass.


B753: The Uptake Of Nutrients By Katahdin Potatoes As Influenced By Soil Moisture Regimes And Rates Of Fertilization, Gurbachan Singh Kalra, Roland A. Struchtemeyer Jan 1979

B753: The Uptake Of Nutrients By Katahdin Potatoes As Influenced By Soil Moisture Regimes And Rates Of Fertilization, Gurbachan Singh Kalra, Roland A. Struchtemeyer

Bulletins

In Aroostook County, Maine, where the annual average rainfall is 35-40 inches, it is generalized by many that moisture is not a limiting factor in potato production. Weather data for Aroostook do, however, show frequent periods of low rainfall during the growing season, and these periods do cause temporary moisture deficiencies in the crop. Struchtemeyer, based on irrigation research in Maine, showed that the potato plant needs approximately 1 inch of water per week during the growing season. From the 1936 to 1955 Maine Weather Records, Pullen and Schrumpf (23) found that about 70 percent of the time, less than ...


Translocation Of C14-Labeled Assimilates In Squash Petioles, William John Raupp Jan 1979

Translocation Of C14-Labeled Assimilates In Squash Petioles, William John Raupp

Masters Theses

A qualitative analysis of sieve tube sap was undertaken to help determine the method of assimilate movement in phloem. Hydroponically-grown squash plants (Cucurbita melopepo torticollis Bailey) were trimmed to a mature, fully-expanded leaf (the source) and one or more immature, unexpanded leaves (the sinks). The blade of the source leaf was exposed to C14O2 in air for 10 minutes and allowed to translocate for 20 or 50 minutes in ambient air. Petioles of treated leaves were cut into sections and ground in cold buffer with a chilled mortar and pestle to extract materials from the translocation stream ...


Biosystematic Studies Of Impatiens Pallida And Impatiens Biflora (Balsaminaceae), Sandra M. Buening Jan 1979

Biosystematic Studies Of Impatiens Pallida And Impatiens Biflora (Balsaminaceae), Sandra M. Buening

Masters Theses

Impatiens pallida Nutt. and Impatiens biflora Walt. are two closely related species which grow together in mixed populations but do not hybridize. Flower buds of each species were enclosed with glycine bags to prevent insect pollination. These were left isolated until after anthesis to test for self-pollination and self-compatibility. Neither capsule formation nor seed set were observed.

Chromosomal smears showed that each species has a haploid number of ten chromosomes. Polyploidy was not observed.

Field observations of insect pollinators (primarily bees) showed indiscriminate visitation.

Flower buds were again bagged as before. During anthesis, individuals of the two species were cross-pollinated ...


The Allelopathic Potential Of Rhododendron Macrophyllum In A Western Cascades Clearcut, Ivan W. Clark Jan 1979

The Allelopathic Potential Of Rhododendron Macrophyllum In A Western Cascades Clearcut, Ivan W. Clark

Dissertations and Theses

The purposes of this study were to determine if Rhododendron macrophyllum has the potential to inhibit the growth of other species through the production of water-soluble toxins which are leached out of its litter by rainfall, and to determine if this potential is realized in the field. The study was therefore composed of two part: 1) a series of bioassays to determine the presence an activity of water-soluble phytotoxins in R. macrophyllum leaf litter, and 2) a field study to describe vegetational patterns associated with R. macrophyllum in a western Cascades clearcut.