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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

The Effect Of Two Growth Retardant Chemicals, Cycocel And B-Nine, On Certain Nitrogeneous Components In Barley Seedlings, Linda Kinser Aug 1969

The Effect Of Two Growth Retardant Chemicals, Cycocel And B-Nine, On Certain Nitrogeneous Components In Barley Seedlings, Linda Kinser

Masters Theses & Specialist Projects

Certain chemicals are known to inhibit growth in many plant species. These chemicals possess a common trait, the ability to inhibit stem elongation by suppressing the activity of the subapical meristematic region (11). These growth retardants have been extensively studied during the past several years in an effort to determine the biochemical mechanism responsible for reduction in plant height. The characteristic effect of these chemical retardants on the growth pattern has been described as producing plants with shorter, thicker stems and broader, darker green leaves. Tolbert, however, noted that although plants treated with the plant growth retardant, Cycocel, (2-chloroethyltrimethlammoniumchloride) and ...


Winter 1969, Warren Bidwell, Basil E. Purhiss, J. Phil Campbell Jr., Edwin M. Wheeler, J. H. Gordon, Melvin Robey, Howard R. Taylor, Harold D. Loden Jan 1969

Winter 1969, Warren Bidwell, Basil E. Purhiss, J. Phil Campbell Jr., Edwin M. Wheeler, J. H. Gordon, Melvin Robey, Howard R. Taylor, Harold D. Loden

Turf Bulletin

  1. Plants to Enhance Man's Environment - Prepared by a Joint Task Force of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and and the State Universities and Land Grant Colleges (page 1)
  2. Man and his Golf -- A Need Fulfilled by Warren Bidwell (8)
  3. The Cost of Infected Water by Basil E. Purhiss (11)
  4. U.S.D.A.'s Campbell Calls for Truth About Polution by Phil Campbell, Jr. (14)
  5. Fertilizers are Not Threatening our Environment by Edwin M. Wheeler (16)
  6. Turf--Basic Principles of Nutrition by J.H. Gordon (18)
  7. Use of Ion-Exchange Resins in Fertilization of Turfgrasses by Melvin Robey (20)
  8. The ...


Fall 1969, Gene C. Nutter, W. H. Garman, Charles Wurster, J. S. Coartney, A. H. Kates Jan 1969

Fall 1969, Gene C. Nutter, W. H. Garman, Charles Wurster, J. S. Coartney, A. H. Kates

Turf Bulletin

Massachusetts Lawn and Turf Grass Council
Better Turf Through Research and Education

  1. Artificial Turf Faces Credibility Gab by Dr. Gene C. Nutter (page 1)
  2. Nitrogen Facts and Fallacies by W.H. Garman (2)
  3. DDT Opponents by Charles Wurster, Jr. (10)
  4. DDT Defenders by Charles Wurster, Jr. (11)
  5. What Type 2,4-D to Use? by J.S. Coartney and A.H. Kates (21)
  6. Irrigation Circuit Break Pinpointed in One Hour (24)


Summer 1969, Robert Schery, Edward G. Konieczny, Jeff Wheeler, William H. Daniel, Elwin E. Deal, James W. Timmerman Jan 1969

Summer 1969, Robert Schery, Edward G. Konieczny, Jeff Wheeler, William H. Daniel, Elwin E. Deal, James W. Timmerman

Turf Bulletin

Massachusetts Turf and Lawn Grass Council
Better Turf Through Research and Education

Contents:

  1. New Lawn Seeds Ready to Sprout Profits by Robert W. Schery (page 3)
  2. Potash Experiments on Turf Grasses by Edward G. Konieczny (4)
  3. Understanding the Basis... Fertilizer Spreader: Spreading Relationships (9)
  4. TVA Shows Sulpher Coated Urea (13)
  5. Salinity Tolerance of Turfgrass by Jeff Wheeler (19)
  6. Poa Annua by William H. Daniel (23)
  7. Turf Management by Elwin E. Deal (26)
  8. The Art and Science of Greenskeeping by James W. Timmerman (27)


1969, Eric Johnson, Robert A. Huntley, Donald Pipczynski, Larry Bunn, John Denison, Frank Gallagher, Edward B. Patroski, Lindsay D. Brown, Tom Mascaro, John C. Schread, Haim B. Gunner, John C. Harper Ii, Norman Gray, R. Spencer Thompson, John N. Magovern, John C. Campbell, Jack Eggens, Warren Bidwell, James L. Holmes Jan 1969

1969, Eric Johnson, Robert A. Huntley, Donald Pipczynski, Larry Bunn, John Denison, Frank Gallagher, Edward B. Patroski, Lindsay D. Brown, Tom Mascaro, John C. Schread, Haim B. Gunner, John C. Harper Ii, Norman Gray, R. Spencer Thompson, John N. Magovern, John C. Campbell, Jack Eggens, Warren Bidwell, James L. Holmes

Turf Clippings

  1. The Value of Earthworms by Eric Johnson (page 1)
  2. Golf Course Bridge Construction by Robert A. Huntley (2)
  3. Importance of Trees and Care by Donald Pipczinski (3)
  4. Management Practices Help Control Turf Diseases by Larry Bunn (3)
  5. Class Will of '69 (5)
  6. Famous Sayings of '69 (6)
  7. The Reluctant Human by John Denison (A-1)
  8. Communicating by Frank Gallagher (A-4)
  9. Vandalism on the Golf Course by Edward B. Patroski (A-7)
  10. The GCSAA Organization - What it Means to You (A-13)
  11. Role of Potash in Turf Production by Lindsay D. Brown (A-17)
  12. Dew is Note Dew by Tom Mascaro (A-28)
  13. Insects in Turf ...


Dehulling And Scarifying Serradella Seed, J R. Weeldenburg, R. W. Smith Jan 1969

Dehulling And Scarifying Serradella Seed, J R. Weeldenburg, R. W. Smith

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

YELLOW FLOWERED SERRADELLA is growing in popularity as a pasture legume on coastal sandy soils in Western Australia, and its use may increase further when new selections become available.

However, its rate of entry into commerce has been limited by the poor germination of the seed available.


Growing And Marketing Yates For Profit, Frank Melville Jan 1969

Growing And Marketing Yates For Profit, Frank Melville

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

THE YATES APPLE is a late maturing red variety which because of its good storage qualities enjoyed a prominent place on the late market for many years.

The trees grow and crop well, the only disabilities are insufficient colour under some circumstances, small size fruit and a tendency to shrivel.

All these troubles can be successfully overcome by appropriate management.


Recommended Cereal Varieties : 1969, H M. Fisher, J. T. Reeves, J. A. Parish Jan 1969

Recommended Cereal Varieties : 1969, H M. Fisher, J. T. Reeves, J. A. Parish

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Cereal varieties widely recommended for growing in 1969 are Gamenya and Falcon wheats, Dampier and Beecher barleys and Swan oats.

Other varieties include the new wheat Darkan, which is recommended only for the higher rainfall areas, the rust resistant wheats Mengavi and Gamut, and Irwin oats for late sowing in northeastern districts.


Saltland Pastures, C V. Malcolm Jan 1969

Saltland Pastures, C V. Malcolm

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

FOLLOWING THE DEVELOPMENT of Agriculture in Western Australia considerable areas of highly productive land have become salt affected to the degree that normal crops and pastures cannot be grown.*

However, species and establishment methods are available which can bring at least some of this land back into production.


More Butterfat Per Acre At Denmark Research Station, Department Of Agriculture, Western Australia Jan 1969

More Butterfat Per Acre At Denmark Research Station, Department Of Agriculture, Western Australia

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

STOCKING rates on dairy farms are generally too low and can be substantially increased, but unfortunately there is no satisfactory measurement to indicate the potential of a particular pasture or environment.

A trial carried out on Denmark Research Station in 1966-67, to obtain information on carrying capacity of a dryland kikuyu-subterranean clover pasture.


Control Of Clover Infertility In Sheep, H G. Neil, H. E. Fels, C. M. Francis Jan 1969

Control Of Clover Infertility In Sheep, H G. Neil, H. E. Fels, C. M. Francis

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

A summary of practices recommended for the control of infertility caused by subterranean clover in West Australian sheep.

PROLONGED grazing of green subterranean clover pastures often reduces ewe fertility. In more extreme cases, obvious signs of clover disease occur.


Wren Wheat Unimpressive In West Australian Trials, Department Of Agriculture, Western Australia Jan 1969

Wren Wheat Unimpressive In West Australian Trials, Department Of Agriculture, Western Australia

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

WREN WHEAT, the subject of current controversy in the Eastern States, has been tested in trials in Western Australia and the results have indicated that it is not likely to yield well in this State.


Poison Plants Of Western Australia : The Toxic Species Of The Genera Gastrolobium And Oxylobium : Champion Bay Poison (G. Oxylobioides Benth.), Sandplain Poison (G. Microcarpum Meissn.), Cluster Poison (G. Bennettsianum C.A. Gardn.), Hutt River Poison (G. Propinquum C.A. Gardn.), Gilbernine Poison (G. Rotundifolium Meissn.), T E H Aplin Jan 1969

Poison Plants Of Western Australia : The Toxic Species Of The Genera Gastrolobium And Oxylobium : Champion Bay Poison (G. Oxylobioides Benth.), Sandplain Poison (G. Microcarpum Meissn.), Cluster Poison (G. Bennettsianum C.A. Gardn.), Hutt River Poison (G. Propinquum C.A. Gardn.), Gilbernine Poison (G. Rotundifolium Meissn.), T E H Aplin

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

THIS article deals with five species of the genus Gastrolobium. The plants look rather similar so in the past have often been confused. They occur over a considerable area of the agricultural region of Western Australia.


Pasture Seed Production In Western Australia, B J. Quinlivan Jan 1969

Pasture Seed Production In Western Australia, B J. Quinlivan

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Pasture seed production in Western Australia is an industry with a somewhat turbulent past. Booms and slumps have been the rule rather than the exception.

However, during the past few years there has been some degree of "stability"—if not in price, at least in terms of total production.


Poison Plants Of Western Australia : The Toxic Species Of The Genera Gastrolobium And Oxylobium : Net-Leaf Poison (O. Racemosum (Turcz.) C.A. Gardn.), Brother-Brother (O. Tetragonophyllum E. Pritzel), Rigid-Leaf Poison (O. Rigidum C.A. Gardn.), Slender Poison (O. Heterophyllum (Turcz.) Benth.), Round-Leaf Poison (G. Pycnostachyum Benth.), T E H Aplin Jan 1969

Poison Plants Of Western Australia : The Toxic Species Of The Genera Gastrolobium And Oxylobium : Net-Leaf Poison (O. Racemosum (Turcz.) C.A. Gardn.), Brother-Brother (O. Tetragonophyllum E. Pritzel), Rigid-Leaf Poison (O. Rigidum C.A. Gardn.), Slender Poison (O. Heterophyllum (Turcz.) Benth.), Round-Leaf Poison (G. Pycnostachyum Benth.), T E H Aplin

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

THIS article deals with five toxic species, all of which are found in the Eyre district of the South-Western region of Western Australia.


Poison Plants Of Western Australia : The Toxic Species Of The Genera Gastrolobium And Oxylobium : Berry Poison (Gastrolobium Parvifolium Benth.) Spike Poison (Gastrolobium Glaucum C.A. Gardn.) Hook-Point Poison (Gastrolobium Hamulosum Meissn.) Scale-Leaf Poison (Gastrolobium Appressum C.A. Gardn.), T E H Aplin Jan 1969

Poison Plants Of Western Australia : The Toxic Species Of The Genera Gastrolobium And Oxylobium : Berry Poison (Gastrolobium Parvifolium Benth.) Spike Poison (Gastrolobium Glaucum C.A. Gardn.) Hook-Point Poison (Gastrolobium Hamulosum Meissn.) Scale-Leaf Poison (Gastrolobium Appressum C.A. Gardn.), T E H Aplin

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

This article deals with four species which, apart from spike poison, may be distinguished by their small leaf size. Scale-leaf poison is found in the Irwin district, and the other three are present in the Avon district.


Pasture Improvement In South Western Australia, J W. Malcolm Jan 1969

Pasture Improvement In South Western Australia, J W. Malcolm

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

"There is no doubt that Australia's enhanced prosperity in the last 30 years has been dependent in no small measure on the use of legume-based pastures." E. M. Hutron, June, 1968. *

THE LAST 30 years have seen an increased interest in pasture improvement which has transformed much of Western Australia. Large areas have been sown to new and improved pasture species—as a result productivity of both livestock and cereal enterprises has risen.


Promising Results On West Kimberley Pindan Country, A L. Payne Jan 1969

Promising Results On West Kimberley Pindan Country, A L. Payne

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

IN the 22 to 28 inch rainfall belt of the West Kimberley area of Western Australia are extensive areas of what is locally known as "pindan" country.

The term "pindan" refers to a light red or yellow sandy soil type supporting scattered Eucalypts, sparse-dense wattle scrub and grasses such as curly spinifex, ribbon grass and native sorghum.


Dormancy And Life Span Of Saffron Thistle Seeds, B J. Quinlivan, J. R. Pierce Jan 1969

Dormancy And Life Span Of Saffron Thistle Seeds, B J. Quinlivan, J. R. Pierce

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

RESEARCH in the Geraldton area has indicated that seeds of the saffron thistle (Carthamus lanatus) spread their germination over some seven years but most germinate in the first two years.

Factors influencing the rate of germination and the survival of seeds are the depth of burial and the presence of termites in the soil.


Lupins In Western Australia. 2. Cultivation Methods, John Sylvester Gladstones Jan 1969

Lupins In Western Australia. 2. Cultivation Methods, John Sylvester Gladstones

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

While lupins are by and large plants of lighter and less fertile soils, important differences exist among them in their soil preferences.

There may also be some differences in climatic requirements. Present knowledge of these differences is summarized in the Table below.


Honey Plants In Western Australia, F. G. Smith Jan 1969

Honey Plants In Western Australia, F. G. Smith

Bulletins - 3000 - 3999

Successful honey production depends, among other things on a good knowledge of the plants which produce nectar.

Every apiarist needs to know which plants are of importance to honey-bees, where those plants occur, and when they flower. He also needs to know which plants produce nectar which will result in the production of good quality honey, and which produce unpalatable or unmarketable honey. To maintain the strength of his bee colonies he also needs to know which plants produce nutritious pollen.

The object of this bulletin is to provide the basic information on these subjects in the main beekeeping areas ...


Fertility Build Up Under Northern Wheatbelt Pastures, M L. Poole Jan 1969

Fertility Build Up Under Northern Wheatbelt Pastures, M L. Poole

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

Experiments on two farmers' properties demonstrated that legume pastures increase the fertility of northern wheatbelt soils.

Crops on legume pastures had higher yields than crops on volunteer pasture.

The experiments also indicated the most productive legume species for each situation and demonstrated that nitrogen added by legumes has a residual effect in the soil.


Rollins Adams Emerson (1873-1947) Horticulturist Pioneer Plant Geneticist Administrator Inspiring Student Adviser, Rosalind Morris Jan 1969

Rollins Adams Emerson (1873-1947) Horticulturist Pioneer Plant Geneticist Administrator Inspiring Student Adviser, Rosalind Morris

Agronomy & Horticulture -- Faculty Publications

The vigorous and highly productive life of Professor R. A. Emerson spanned 74 years and 7 months. His birth and death took place In New York State, but Nebraska nurtured his early development and schooling. He spent 15 years of his professional career at the University of Nebraska, followed by 33 years at Cornell University.

Rollins Adams Emerson, son of Charles David and Mary C. Adams Emerson (a direct descendant of Henry Adams), was born May 5, 1873 at Pillar Point, New York State on the eastern shore of Lake Ontario. In 1880 his family moved to Nebraska and settled ...


Plant Galls, Michael Paul Grisham Jan 1969

Plant Galls, Michael Paul Grisham

Honors Theses

Plant galls, or cedidia, are defined as

...pathologically developed cells, tissues, or organs of plants that have risen mostly by hypertrophy and hyperplasy under the influence of parasitic organisms like bacteria, fungi, nematoda, mites, or insects.

The plant gall is unique in providing not only food, but shelter as well for its host. While the host benefits, damage to the plant results. Among other things sap flow is disturbed, premature decay results, non-essential parts are developed at the cost of essential parts, and many other injuries occur. A few examples of the benefits of plan galls may be cited. Nitrogen ...