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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Flippase Inhibitors As Antimicrobial Agents, Robert Tancer May 2022

Flippase Inhibitors As Antimicrobial Agents, Robert Tancer

Seton Hall University Dissertations and Theses (ETDs)

Drug resistant microbes are a considerable challenge for modern medicine to overcome. The research described in this dissertation involved development of lipid flippase inhibitors and investigating their potential as antimicrobial agents against various drug resistant microbes. The microbes primarily investigated were methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) & Cryptococcus neoformans. Chapter 1 reviews the historical perspective and summarizes the current state of the field of research. In Chapter 2, the design space of an antimicrobial peptide known as humimycin was explored and the effects of modifications on its structure were observed against MRSA. Several key observations resulted. Most notably, the nanoparticles formed ...


Parameter Estimation Using Nudging On The Logistic Growth Equation, Susan Rogowski May 2022

Parameter Estimation Using Nudging On The Logistic Growth Equation, Susan Rogowski

Biology and Medicine Through Mathematics Conference

No abstract provided.


Elevated Substitution Rates Among Wolbachia-Infected Mosquito Species Results In Apparent Phylogenetic Discordance., James E. Russell, Michael Saum, Rebekah Williams May 2022

Elevated Substitution Rates Among Wolbachia-Infected Mosquito Species Results In Apparent Phylogenetic Discordance., James E. Russell, Michael Saum, Rebekah Williams

Georgia Journal of Science

As one of the most widely distributed bacterial cytoplasmic symbionts on earth, Wolbachia pipientis Hertig serves as a model organism for the understanding of host-symbiont interactions. Many mosquito species are infected with Wolbachia strains that induce a form of reproductive manipulation called cytoplasmic incompatibility, in which infected females gain a reproductive advantage over uninfected females in mixed infection populations. The selective advantage of cytoplasmic incompatibility often results in a population sweep of Wolbachia and co-transmitted mitochondrial genomes. Mitochondrial evolution and phylogenetic inferences drawn from mitochondrial gene sequences are thus potentially compromised by reproductive manipulating symbionts, like Wolbachia. Our initial analyses ...


Characterization Of A Helicobacter Pylori Small Rna By Rt-Pcr, Roxanne Mcpeck, Andrea Castillo May 2022

Characterization Of A Helicobacter Pylori Small Rna By Rt-Pcr, Roxanne Mcpeck, Andrea Castillo

2022 Symposium

Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial gastric pathogen infecting approximately 50% of the human population, produces gastritis, ulcers, and gastric cancers. Colonizing the inhospitable and fluctuating environment in the stomach requires tight genetic control. However, H. pylori lacks many genetic regulatory elements present in other bacteria to control gene expression. Instead, over 200 small RNAs (sRNAs; noncoding RNAs shorter than 300 nucleotides) have been found in this bacterium, but few have been fully characterized. Of those, many are antisense to virulence genes. Characterizing these sRNAs is important in understanding the mechanisms of molecular genetics and potentially supporting medical management of this pathogen ...


Many Questions Remain Unanswered About The Role Of Microbial Transmission In Epizootic Shell Disease In American Lobsters (Homarus Americanus), A Perspective Article, Suzanne Ishaq, Sarah M. Turner, M. Scarlett Tudor, Jean Macrae, Heather Hamlin, Joelle Kilchenmann, Grace Lee, Deborah A. Bouchard May 2022

Many Questions Remain Unanswered About The Role Of Microbial Transmission In Epizootic Shell Disease In American Lobsters (Homarus Americanus), A Perspective Article, Suzanne Ishaq, Sarah M. Turner, M. Scarlett Tudor, Jean Macrae, Heather Hamlin, Joelle Kilchenmann, Grace Lee, Deborah A. Bouchard

Journal Articles

Despite decades of research on lobster species’ biology, ecology, and microbiology, there are still unresolved questions about the microbial communities which associate in or on lobsters under healthy or diseased states, microbial acquisition, as well as microbial transmission between lobsters and between lobsters and their environment. There is an untapped opportunity for metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metabolomics to be added to the existing wealth of knowledge to more precisely track disease transmission, etiology, and host-microbe dynamics. Moreover, we need to gain this knowledge of wild lobster microbiomes before climate change alters environmental and host-microbial communities more than it likely already has ...


The Impact Of Processing Body Proteins On An Adenovirus Infection, La`Quita Randolph May 2022

The Impact Of Processing Body Proteins On An Adenovirus Infection, La`Quita Randolph

Biology Theses

Adenovirus is a nonenveloped, double-stranded DNA virus that contains a 36 Kbp genome. The E4 ORF3 region of its genome consists of an E4 11k protein that can reorganize host cell components by relocalizing cellular proteins. One such cellular component is the cytoplasmic processing body, which consists of proteins involved in translational repression of mRNA and mRNA degradation. During an adenovirus infection, processing body proteins Ddx6 and Pat1b have been shown to colocalize and form aggresomes. Aggresomes induced by E4 11k are specific to the adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad 5). In this study, cytoplasmic Pat1b foci were observed and quantified ...


Comparative Transcriptomic Study Between Cyanobacteria That Contain Chlorophyll D And Those That Lack Chlorophyll D, Fernanda Montoya May 2022

Comparative Transcriptomic Study Between Cyanobacteria That Contain Chlorophyll D And Those That Lack Chlorophyll D, Fernanda Montoya

Honors Capstones

All cyanobacteria, which perform oxygenic photosynthesis on Earth, contain the photosynthetic pigment chlorophyll a (Chl a) that absorbs light in the violet and red region of the visible spectrum. Cyanobacteria of the Acaryochloris species, however, contain the rare photosynthetic pigment chlorophyll d (Chl d) that absorbs light in the far-red region. Chl d’s ability to absorb light in this region allows it to avoid competing with other photosynthetic organisms for light. Creating a photosystem that uses Chl d in plants would be of great use for agricultural land optimization, but requires knowledge of the biosynthetic pathways of Chl d ...


Investigation Of Genomic Instability Induced By G-Quadruplexes In The Absence Of Functional Topoisomerase 1 In Yeast, Alexandra Berroyer May 2022

Investigation Of Genomic Instability Induced By G-Quadruplexes In The Absence Of Functional Topoisomerase 1 In Yeast, Alexandra Berroyer

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Dissertations and Theses (Open Access)

Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) is an enzyme that removes transcriptionally generated negative supercoils by binding and nicking DNA. Since transcription of guanine-rich DNA leads to the formation of G-quadruplex (G4) structures, Top1’s function likely suppresses G4-formation. In support of this, Top1 significantly reduces co-transcriptional G4 DNA-associated genomic instability at a model G4-motif in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, whether Top1 suppresses G4-formation on a genome-wide scale in yeast remains unexplored. Therefore, I aimed to uncover if deletion of Top1 enhances genome-wide G4-formation in S. cerevisiae. As an approach to quantify global G4-formation, I expressed the G4-specific antibody BG4 from a yeast vector ...


Time Course Investigation Of The Dermal Leukocyte Response To Lipoteichoic Acid In Chickens, Ian Gilbert May 2022

Time Course Investigation Of The Dermal Leukocyte Response To Lipoteichoic Acid In Chickens, Ian Gilbert

Animal Science Undergraduate Honors Theses

Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is component of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria that stimulates inflammation during bacterial infection. However, few studies have investigated the in vivo immune response to LTA, and none of the in vivo studies done have been performed in birds. For this project, the pulp (a skin-derivative) of growing feathers (GFs) of chickens were used as a test site to investigate the in vivo effects of intradermally injected LTA. In Study 1, the pulp of 12 GFs of 11-week-old Light-brown Leghorn (LBL) males were injected with 10 μL of differing concentrations of LTA (0.1, 1.0 ...


Mathematical Modeling Suggests Cooperation Of Plant-Infecting Viruses, Joshua Miller, Vitaly V. Ganusov, Tessa Burch-Smith May 2022

Mathematical Modeling Suggests Cooperation Of Plant-Infecting Viruses, Joshua Miller, Vitaly V. Ganusov, Tessa Burch-Smith

Chancellor’s Honors Program Projects

No abstract provided.


Exploring Nitrogen Fixation In Methanosarcina Acetivorans, Rylee Cook May 2022

Exploring Nitrogen Fixation In Methanosarcina Acetivorans, Rylee Cook

Biological Sciences Undergraduate Honors Theses

As of 2016, the genomes of over sixty species of methanogenic archaea have been sequenced.4 Research on the genomes of methanogens such as M. acetivorans led to the characterization of numerous genes with unknown functions. Genes similar to those of nitrogenase have been shown to possess functions unrelated to nitrogen fixation, such as F430 biosynthesis genes. 5,6,7 My research focused on the uncharacterized gene clusters ma2032-33 and ma1631-33 (Figure 1). These genes have conserved nitrogenase domains: ma2032 has fused nifH and nifD domains, while ma2033 has a nifD domain. The ma1631-33 gene cluster contains two nitrogenase homologs ...


Bacteriophages: Paving The Road For The Future Of Medicine, Luke Brinkerhoff May 2022

Bacteriophages: Paving The Road For The Future Of Medicine, Luke Brinkerhoff

Honors Theses

Bacteriophages are a possible solution to antibiotic resistance, which is predicted to be detrimental world-wide by the year 2050. Personal field research was also conducted for a project studying the characteristics of two bacteriophages on a single bacterial host.


Elevated Levels Of External Cysteine Inhibit Nitrogen Fixation By The Methanogenic Archaeon Methanosarcina Acetivorans, Regan Massey May 2022

Elevated Levels Of External Cysteine Inhibit Nitrogen Fixation By The Methanogenic Archaeon Methanosarcina Acetivorans, Regan Massey

Biological Sciences Undergraduate Honors Theses

Methanogens are nitrogen fixing and methane producing archaea that play a key role in the cycling of carbon and nitrogen on earth. The global carbon and nitrogen cycle is vital to all life which makes the methanogen a primary organism of study. Methanogens are the only archaea capable of fixing nitrogen, and in order to do so, methanogens use a vital enzyme called the nitrogenase which fixes dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia (NH3). Expanding our understanding on metabolic processes of methanogens allows us to understand their environmental impact and advance their use in biotechnological applications. Methanosarcina acetivorans is the model used ...


Studying The Lysine Acetylation Of Aconitase Isozymes In E. Coli, Sara Ottinger May 2022

Studying The Lysine Acetylation Of Aconitase Isozymes In E. Coli, Sara Ottinger

Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Honors Theses

The contents of this thesis have been modified from the publication “Araujo J, Ottinger S, Venkat S, Gan Q and Fan C (2022) Studying Acetylation of Aconitase Isozymes by Genetic Code Expansion. Front. Chem. 10:862483”. Though studies have found multiple lysine sites in which acetylation takes place in Escherichia Coli aconitase, acetylation’s effects on the enzyme’s activity have yet to be studied. Aconitase is the dehydratase-hydratase found in the citric acid and glyoxylate cycles responsible for the reversible isomerization of citrate to isocitrate via cis-aconitate intermediate. There are two isoforms of aconitase in E. coli: AcnA and ...


Native And Non-Native Ant Impacts On Soil Microbes, Hannah A. Stewart May 2022

Native And Non-Native Ant Impacts On Soil Microbes, Hannah A. Stewart

Biology Theses

Organisms produce chemical weapons for defense, but target organisms can develop resistance. In their introduced range, non-native species may bring “novel weapons” against which native organisms have not co-evolved resistance. The invasive European fire ant (Myrmica rubra) may have brought antimicrobial secretions to the Northeastern United States that are novel weapons against native fungal and bacterial soil organisms. I hypothesized that M. rubra would better inhibit seed pathogens resulting in greater emergence of native myrmecochorous Viola sororia seeds and, as a side effect, more strongly inhibit arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi than a native seed dispersing ant (Aphaenogaster picea). I also expected ...


Temporal And Spatial Comparison Of Pseudo-Nitzschia Species Composition And Domoic Acid In Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island And The Northeast U.S. Shelf, Isabella Church, Bethany D. Jenkins May 2022

Temporal And Spatial Comparison Of Pseudo-Nitzschia Species Composition And Domoic Acid In Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island And The Northeast U.S. Shelf, Isabella Church, Bethany D. Jenkins

Senior Honors Projects

Diatoms are unicellular algae that make up a significant portion of phytoplankton biomass at the base of marine food webs. Narragansett Bay (NB), RI is home to several species of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia (P-n), some of which are known to cause harmful algal blooms through the production of the potent neurotoxin domoic acid (DA). This toxin can lead to Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning in humans through the consumption of affected shellfish. Although the presence of P-n has been well established in NB for over 50 years, DA levels have only recently become a problem, with shellfish harvest closures in 2016 ...


The Role Of Stm1987 And Arti In Arginine Response Of Salmonella Typhimurium, Deeba Mohseni May 2022

The Role Of Stm1987 And Arti In Arginine Response Of Salmonella Typhimurium, Deeba Mohseni

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Cyclic-di-GMP, a common bacterial second messenger, has been thought to help develop virulence and biofilms in bacteria, most specifically in Salmonella Typhimurium. By being able to dysregulate cyclic-di-GMP production, virulence may be better combatted. STM1987, an L-arginine-responsive diguanylate cyclase with a periplasmic sensory domain, dimerizes and generates the bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP in response to the amino acid L-arginine in a pathway that also requires the periplasmic L-arginine-binding protein ArtI. Their biochemical responses to L-arginine and when they dimerize could help clarify this pathway, so I sought to develop a periplasmic dimerization sensor to better monitor these biochemical interactions. Similar ...


Genomic Analysis Of Metabolic Differences Found In Clostridium Perfringens That Cause Necrotic Enteritis In Poultry, Connor Aylor Apr 2022

Genomic Analysis Of Metabolic Differences Found In Clostridium Perfringens That Cause Necrotic Enteritis In Poultry, Connor Aylor

Dissertations & Theses in Veterinary and Biomedical Science

Clostridium perfringens is a common member of gut microbiota in healthy animals, but can also be an important pathogen in human and veterinary medicine. It produces several protein toxins that contribute to both histotoxic and enteric diseases in animals. Necrotic enteritis in poultry has been associated with the NetB toxin of C. perfringens; however, this toxin alone is insufficient to cause disease in infected chickens. While considerable research has focused on the presence of toxins and virulence factors, little has been done to assess the function of metabolic factors on the ability of the bacteria to cause disease. In this ...


Literature Review: Antibody Production In Mice In Response To Aspergillus Fumigatus Inhalation, Jenica Hancock, Courtney Folk Apr 2022

Literature Review: Antibody Production In Mice In Response To Aspergillus Fumigatus Inhalation, Jenica Hancock, Courtney Folk

Student Academic Conference

Aspergillus fumigatus is a commonly inhaled respiratory fungal pathogen and an allergen found in flooded indoor environments, household dust, soil, and plant matter. Inhalation of A. fumigatus poses a threat to weakened immune systems due to the potential of infection in the lungs or sinuses which can spread to other areas of the body. The mouse genome is 99% similar to the human genome, and therefore they serve effectively in modeling the effects of inhaled A. fumigatus. A comprehensive literature search of antibody production in mice in response to A. fumigatus inhalation was conducted utilizing PubMed and the search terms ...


Aeromonas Phage Research And The Public Health Impact Of Antibiotics In Aquaculture Workers, Madelyn Merchant Apr 2022

Aeromonas Phage Research And The Public Health Impact Of Antibiotics In Aquaculture Workers, Madelyn Merchant

Honors Projects

One of the most common fish diseases in aquaculture is Aeromonas infection. The most common way to treat this infection is through antibiotics. The bacteria in the fish can become antibiotic-resistant and perpetuate the disease. The diseases in fish create a huge financial loss and the industry loses $6 billion per year due to diseases in fish. An alternative to antibiotics is bacteriophage which causes less environmental degradation and is better for human gut flora. In aquaculture there have been examples of aquaculture workers becoming sick from the water in aquaculture ponds as well as from people eating the fish ...


Diversity Of Bacteriophage In Burkholderia Species, Abigail Price Apr 2022

Diversity Of Bacteriophage In Burkholderia Species, Abigail Price

Honors Projects

Bacteriophages are viruses that infect and replicate within bacteria and offer the potential of a therapeutic alternative to chronic infections that do not respond to antibiotic-based therapies. B. vietnamiensis is one of a number of Burkholderia species involved with chronic drug resistant infections in the lungs of individuals with compromised respiratory systems, as found in those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and, most especially, are of particular significance in patients with cystic fibrosis. The diversity of the Burkholderia species is explored by using online databases and looking at bacteriophage or phage-encoding viruses found in B. vietnamiensis. The open reading frames ...


Staphylococcus Aureus Isolates From People That Use Antibacterial Soap Have A Higher Percentage Of Penicillin Resistance, Xou Xiong Apr 2022

Staphylococcus Aureus Isolates From People That Use Antibacterial Soap Have A Higher Percentage Of Penicillin Resistance, Xou Xiong

Research and Scholarship Symposium Posters

The Staph Study at CSP aims to identify bacteria from voluntary students. Swabs of bacteria were collected and cultured. Then, a series of tests were performed to identify the type of bacteria present. It was found that 8 of 12 strains collected were Staphylococcus aureus because of the presence of bubbles, light halos, purple clustered bacteria, dark purple halos, and agglutination.


Csp Shows Athletes Have A Higher Risk Of Carriage With Staphylococcus Aureus Than Non-Athletes, Kler Paw Apr 2022

Csp Shows Athletes Have A Higher Risk Of Carriage With Staphylococcus Aureus Than Non-Athletes, Kler Paw

Research and Scholarship Symposium Posters

Studies show that 648 CSP students are non-athletic & 230 CSP athletic students, Staphylococcus aureus infections have become a common condition among athletes Vs. Non-athletic. Staphylococcus aureus infection is caused by a new strain of Staphylococcus bacteria that has become resistant to many of the antibiotics used to treat ordinary Staphinfections. It can also easily spread by sharing athletic equipment or towels, razors, and uniforms. Poor hygiene, such as skipping hand-washing before and after sports, can also lead to Staphylococcal infection. Injuries may allow the bacteria to enter the skin. The bacteria can enter the body through an open cut or ...


Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (Tsst-1) More Prevalent In Staphylococcus Aureus Strains Taken From Men Than From Women, Bethany Rother Apr 2022

Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (Tsst-1) More Prevalent In Staphylococcus Aureus Strains Taken From Men Than From Women, Bethany Rother

Research and Scholarship Symposium Posters

S. aureus is an opportunistic bacteria present in the anterior nares of roughly one third of the human population. One of the toxins certain strains are known to produce is toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). This can cause both menstrual and non-menstrual toxic shock syndrome (TSS), but is more widely known for the menstrual variation due to the high onset of TSS in women from high absorbency tampons in the 1980s. An analysis of survey data found that surprisingly more men carried S. aureus strains with the TSST-1 gene than women.


Predominantly Methicillin-Susceptible S. Aureus Bacteria Found In Csp Students’ S. Aureus Strains, Roma Ambo Apr 2022

Predominantly Methicillin-Susceptible S. Aureus Bacteria Found In Csp Students’ S. Aureus Strains, Roma Ambo

Research and Scholarship Symposium Posters

Positive Staphylococcus aureus strains from CSP students were tested for methicillin resistance (MRSA) using the Kirby-bauer assay. Kirby-bauer assay technique was used to determine the sensitivity of staphylococcus aureus bacteria against oxacillin. MRSA infection is the result of a bacteria that has built resistance against the antibiotics used to treat staph infections. The results of this experiment concludes that majority of the strains tested are methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA).


Examining Bacteriophage Reliance On The Tola Protein Of Escherichia Coli, Ellen Davis Apr 2022

Examining Bacteriophage Reliance On The Tola Protein Of Escherichia Coli, Ellen Davis

Honors Projects

With the ever-growing crisis of antibiotic resistant bacteria, bacteriophage provide an important potential alternative therapy to treat infections when antibiotics are ineffective. For this reason, it is important to understand the mechanisms bacteriophage use to enter their bacterial host cell. The cellular envelope of the gram-negative bacterium E. coli contains a protein system known as Tol-Pal, which utilizes energy from the Proton Motive Force to carry out several cellular functions, including some associated with cellular division and outer-membrane stability. Certain bacteriophage take advantage of the energy produced by this system to cross the bacterial cell membrane. One important protein of ...


Assessing Environmental Factors That Influence Cyanobacterial Blooms In Skinn Lake, Kloe Atwood Apr 2022

Assessing Environmental Factors That Influence Cyanobacterial Blooms In Skinn Lake, Kloe Atwood

Honors Projects

Global lakes are experiencing an increase in toxic algal blooms that can be damaging to the environment. These blooms are caused by cyanobacteria, specifically a species called Planktothrix. Skinn Lake, in Ohio, is a location of a cyanobacterial bloom that is mainly populated by Planktothrix rubescens. This lake was further examined to identify the major toxin-producing bacteria and identify environmental microbes surrounding the bloom. When the data was examined it was found that the microbiomes of the lake greatly differed between the winter (bloom) months and the summer (non-bloom) months. This difference can be viewed within the nutrient analysis from ...


Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Evades Predation By Myxococcus Xanthus, Sarah Joie Beauvais Apr 2022

Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Evades Predation By Myxococcus Xanthus, Sarah Joie Beauvais

Symposium of Student Scholars

Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes an estimated 32,600 hospital-acquired-infections and 2,700 estimated deaths in the US in 2017(CDC). Myxococcus xanthus is a strain of myxobacteria that preys on Pseudomonas sp, through the production of antibiotics and digestive enzymes. In previous experiments, P. aeruginosa evaded predation, through an unknown mechanism. Using confocal microscopy, this research investigates if quorum sensing, a cell density-dependent signaling pathway, could be a factor in motility and evasion of M. xanthus. Liquid suspensions of log-phase PA01 were dyed with two fluorescent dyes: SYTO 9 for marking live cells and Propidium iodide (PI) for marking dead ...


Microbial Diversity And Community Structure In Sediments Associated With The Seagrass (Thallassia Testudinum) In Apalachicola Bay, Florida, Rahma Ahmed, Thomas Mcelroy, Troy Mutchler Apr 2022

Microbial Diversity And Community Structure In Sediments Associated With The Seagrass (Thallassia Testudinum) In Apalachicola Bay, Florida, Rahma Ahmed, Thomas Mcelroy, Troy Mutchler

Symposium of Student Scholars

Seagrass is an angiosperm which provides many ecosystem services in coastal areas, such as providing food, shelter and nurseries for many species, and decreasing the impact of waves on shorelines. A global assessment reported that 29% of known seagrass meadows are in a state of decline due to the effects of human activity. Seagrass is commonly found in shallow marine waters where they form meadows containing a microbiome that plays an important role in providing nutrients for seagrass growth, though little is known about the microorganisms within the seagrass meadow sediments. Our project collected sediments from seagrass meadows and adjacent ...


Investigating Alternative Induction Of The S. Aureus 80a Prophage, Jody Caretti Apr 2022

Investigating Alternative Induction Of The S. Aureus 80a Prophage, Jody Caretti

Student Scholar Showcase

Widespread antibiotic resistance has quickly become one of the most concerning crises affecting modern medicine, especially in cases of Staphylococcal infections, which have become resistant to all ��-lactam antibiotics. As a result, research into alternative forms of treatment for bacterial infections is a top priority. Bacteriophage therapy is a popular candidate for replacing antibiotics, due to the way the viruses interact with the bacteria. The 80�� prophage integrates its DNA into Staphylococcus aureus strain 10616 via the lysogenic cycle, and replicates with the bacterial cell. When stressed, the bacteria stop replicating and the prophage stimulates the lytic cycle, activating transcription ...