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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Yield And Mechanical Properties Of Veneer From Maine-Grown Eastern Spruce And Balsam Fir, Marshal Bertrand May 2022

Yield And Mechanical Properties Of Veneer From Maine-Grown Eastern Spruce And Balsam Fir, Marshal Bertrand

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This research focused on the utilization of Maine Eastern spruce and balsam fir for veneer production. Maine currently has no manufacturers of or products using structural veneer. The diversification of markets for Maine’s softwoods has been identified as a route to increase the resilience of the forest-based economy. Veneer production technology has improved significantly since the last look at Maine spruce veneer (1969), justifying the reinvestigation of Maine spruce-fir veneer. The objective of this research was to provide information on the yield of processing veneer and the quality of said veneer. A sample size of 37 Eastern spruce and 38 …


Effects Of Plasma Treatment And Sanding Process On Surface Roughness Of Wood Veneers, Cenk Demi̇rkir, İsmai̇l Aydin, Semra Çolak, Gürsel Çolakoğlu Jan 2014

Effects Of Plasma Treatment And Sanding Process On Surface Roughness Of Wood Veneers, Cenk Demi̇rkir, İsmai̇l Aydin, Semra Çolak, Gürsel Çolakoğlu

Turkish Journal of Agriculture and Forestry

An ideal veneer surface is crucial for good panel properties in plywood manufacturing. The aim of this study was to compare plasma treatments and sanding (mechanical) processes with respect to the surface roughness of veneers. Rotary-cut veneers with a thickness of 2 mm from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) logs were used as material. After rotary peeling, veneer sheets were dried at 110 °C in a veneer dryer. Veneer sheets were divided into 4 main groups. The surfaces of the control veneer sheets were left untreated. Two different grits of sandpaper, 80 and 180, were used for sanding the surfaces of …


Influence Of Geographic Origin And Soil Properties On Color Of Black Walnut Veneer, Douglas D. Stokke, Edward C. Workman Jr., John E. Phelps, Felix Ponder Jr. Jan 1997

Influence Of Geographic Origin And Soil Properties On Color Of Black Walnut Veneer, Douglas D. Stokke, Edward C. Workman Jr., John E. Phelps, Felix Ponder Jr.

Douglas D. Stokke

Walnut veneer frorn sites in Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana was analyzed for color attributes and chemical properties. Veneer color also was compared to an industry color standard. Soil chemical and physical properties were measured on selected sites in each state. In general, walnut trees grown on soils with equal proportions of sand, silt, and clay have better veneer color attributes than trees grown on soils with high clay I sand or clay I silt ratios.


Field Identification Of Birdseye In Sugar Maple (Acer Saccharum Marsh.), Douglas D. Stokke, Don C. Bragg Jan 1994

Field Identification Of Birdseye In Sugar Maple (Acer Saccharum Marsh.), Douglas D. Stokke, Don C. Bragg

Douglas D. Stokke

Birdseye grain distortions in sugar maple must be identified to capture the full value of a timber sale throughout the economic range of birdseye's occurrence. Even when relatively common, birdseye veneer typically makes up less than 1 percent of the harvested volume, but may account for one-half of the value of the sale. With prices recently reaching $50,000 per Mbf for prime logs, omission of birdseye (when present) from cruise data could cause significant economic loss for the forest landowner. But figured wood can sometimes be detected in standing timber (Pillow 1955). Field identification of birdseye sugar maple is critical …


Aspen For Veneer, Hereford Garland May 1948

Aspen For Veneer, Hereford Garland

Aspen Bibliography

In considering possible uses for the large supply of aspen in the Lake States, veneer and plywood manufacture should not be overlooked. Although aspen is not currently in great demand as a veneer species, the reason is not because of technical deficiencies of the wood for this purpose, but rather because there is no appreciable veneer industry in the region adapted for using aspen as small logs, the form in which it is most available.