Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

A Buried Spruce Forest Provides Evidence At The Stand And Landscape Scale For The Effects Of Environment On Vegetation At The Pleistocene/Holocene Boundary, Douglas D. Stokke Feb 2000

A Buried Spruce Forest Provides Evidence At The Stand And Landscape Scale For The Effects Of Environment On Vegetation At The Pleistocene/Holocene Boundary, Douglas D. Stokke

Douglas D. Stokke

Due to a unique set of circumstances, we were able to excavate an entire spruce (Picea) forest in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, USA, which was buried in the early Holocene (9928 ± 133 uncalibrated 14C years bp). Trees ranged from < 5 cm to > 50 cm in diameter, and dominants were approximately 9 m tall. The stand was multi-aged, with a maximum tree age of 145 years. Well-preserved stem cross-sections (n = 140) were recovered and the entire stand was mapped. Stand reconstruction combined with pollen and sediment analysis revealed a pure spruce forest in the sandy lowlands surrounded by hills dominated by pine, oak …


Effects Of Resource Availability On Carbon Allocation And Developmental Instability In Cloned Birch Seedlings, Brian J. Wilsey, Janne H. Lappalainen, Jocelyn Martel, Kyösti Lempa, Vladimir Ossipov Jan 2000

Effects Of Resource Availability On Carbon Allocation And Developmental Instability In Cloned Birch Seedlings, Brian J. Wilsey, Janne H. Lappalainen, Jocelyn Martel, Kyösti Lempa, Vladimir Ossipov

Brian J. Wilsey

Abundant nitrogen improves seedling growth and establishment. Vigorous growth brings about changes in rates and patterns of plant development and changes in the relationship between primary and secondary metabolism, which may make seedlings more susceptible to herbivores and pathogens than are slow-growing seedlings. We studied how nitrogen fertilization and manual defoliation of source leaves affect growth, carbon allocation, and developmental instability in cloned seedlings of white birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.). Biomass was higher, whereas concentrations of most classes of phenolic compounds were lower in the nitrogen-rich environment. Interestingly, fertilization did not change the concentrations of cell wall–bound proanthocyanidins, which represent …