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Full-Text Articles in Torts

Making Investment Arbitration Work For All: Addressing The Deficits In Access To Remedy For Wronged Host State Citizens Through Investment Arbitration, Emmanuel T. Laryea Nov 2018

Making Investment Arbitration Work For All: Addressing The Deficits In Access To Remedy For Wronged Host State Citizens Through Investment Arbitration, Emmanuel T. Laryea

Boston College Law Review

The current dominant system for resolving international investment disputes is the Investor-State Dispute Settlement system or, more precisely, the Investor-State Arbitration system (ISA). The ISA system has proved to be an effective avenue for remedy for foreign investors whose investments are wrongfully impaired by host states. However, the system is not accessible to Host State Citizens (HSCs) whose interests may be harmed by investors. Wronged HSCs can seek redress in domestic fora only. The domestic fora in many jurisdictions leave many wronged HSCs without remedy, a problem that has long been acknowledged. This Essay proposes a solution. It proposes that ...


Is Cost-Benefit Analysis The Only Game In Town?, Gregory C. Keating Nov 2018

Is Cost-Benefit Analysis The Only Game In Town?, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Standards which prescribe more than efficient precaution against physical harm and health injury are commonplace in American environmental, health and safety regulation. The safe level standard, for example, requires the elimination of all significant risks. The feasibility standard requires the elimination of significant risks to the extent insofar as it is possible to do so without impairing the long run survival of the activities which give rise to the risks. These standards reach back more than a generation to the founding of the EPA and OSHA. You might think that they are too well-entrenched in American law to be subject ...


Principles Of Risk Imposition And The Priority Of Avoiding Harm, Gregory C. Keating Nov 2018

Principles Of Risk Imposition And The Priority Of Avoiding Harm, Gregory C. Keating

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Standards which prescribe more than efficient precaution against physical harm and health injury are commonplace in American environmental, health and safety regulation. The “safe level” standard, for example, requires the elimination of all significant risks. The “feasibility” standard requires the elimination of significant risks to the extent insofar as it is possible to do so without impairing the long run survival of the activities which give rise to the risks. These standards reach back more than a generation to the founding of the Environmental Protection and Occupational Health and Safety Agencies. You might expect them to be too well-entrenched to ...


Religious Liberty: Fundamental Right Or Nuisance, Vincent Martin Bonventre Oct 2018

Religious Liberty: Fundamental Right Or Nuisance, Vincent Martin Bonventre

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Faulty Law And Economics Of The “Baseball Rule”, Nathaniel Grow, Zachary Flagel Oct 2018

The Faulty Law And Economics Of The “Baseball Rule”, Nathaniel Grow, Zachary Flagel

William & Mary Law Review

This Article examines the so-called “Baseball Rule,” the legal doctrine generally immunizing professional baseball teams from liability when spectators are hit by errant balls or bats leaving the field of play. Following a recent series of high-profile fan injuries at Major League Baseball (MLB) games, this century-old legal doctrine has come under increased scrutiny, with both academic and media commentators calling for its abolition. Nevertheless, despite these criticisms, courts have almost uniformly continued to apply the Baseball Rule to spectator-injury lawsuits.

This Article offers two contributions to the ongoing debate surrounding the Baseball Rule. First, it provides new empirical evidence ...


Dolorfino V. Univ. Med. Ctr. Of S. Nev., 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 79 (Oct. 4, 2018), Steven Brecher Oct 2018

Dolorfino V. Univ. Med. Ctr. Of S. Nev., 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 79 (Oct. 4, 2018), Steven Brecher

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court held that a claim of injury suffered during medical treatment may not be dismissed for lack of a supporting affidavit from a medical expert if the injured body part is not “directly involved in” or “proximate” to the treatment, where those phrases are to be interpreted quite narrowly.


What Does Law Have To Do With It? The Jury's Role In Cases Alleging Violations Of Law, Custom And Standards, Barbara Kritchevsky Sep 2018

What Does Law Have To Do With It? The Jury's Role In Cases Alleging Violations Of Law, Custom And Standards, Barbara Kritchevsky

Arkansas Law Review

Rules telling people how to act come from many sources. Statutory law governs a wide range of conduct—driving an auto-mobile, operating a business, building a home. Non-governmental standards reach just as far. Individuals run their businesses in accordance with the law, but also by observing professional standards and industry customs. A hotel owner might look to state or local law to determine how to fence the hotel pool or whether to have a lifeguard on duty. The owner might also decide what to do by looking to industry customs or non-govern-mental safety guidelines, such as those a private body ...


The Future Of Tort Litigation For Undocumented Immigrants In Donald Trump’S “Great” America, Dina Lexine Sarver Sep 2018

The Future Of Tort Litigation For Undocumented Immigrants In Donald Trump’S “Great” America, Dina Lexine Sarver

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

No abstract provided.


Negligence: Purpose, Elements & Evidence: The Role Of Foreseeability In The Law Of Each State, Lee Peoples, Vicki Lawrence Macdougall Aug 2018

Negligence: Purpose, Elements & Evidence: The Role Of Foreseeability In The Law Of Each State, Lee Peoples, Vicki Lawrence Macdougall

Lee Peoples

The aim of the book is to provide a brief refresher on the basic tort law of each state, to be a research tool for the bench, and to observe the current role of foreseeability in each state’s law. Thirty-four of the book’s chapters were written by law professors and law librarians.  The remaining chapters were authored by practitioners.
 
In his forward to the book, the Honorable Robert H. Henry Former United States Circuit Judge for the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, explains:
 
Under Professor MacDougall’s guidance, this book follows the “sentence/citation format,” which removes author ...


Foreword: The Future Of Qualified Immunity, Samuel L. Bray Aug 2018

Foreword: The Future Of Qualified Immunity, Samuel L. Bray

Notre Dame Law Review

Qualified immunity is not an unqualified success. This defense, which protects officers from liability for damages unless they violate clearly established law, has attracted many critics. Some object to its weak historical foundations, while others find its policy effects to be perverse. Yet the doctrine is shown a special solicitude by the Supreme Court. The Court issues many summary reversals in qualified immunity cases, and the effect of these reversals is all in one direction: they protect, entrench, and extend the defense of qualified immunity. There have been calls for a reconsideration of the doctrine, including in a recent opinion ...


A Qualified Defense Of Qualified Immunity, Aaron L. Nielson, Christopher J. Walker Aug 2018

A Qualified Defense Of Qualified Immunity, Aaron L. Nielson, Christopher J. Walker

Notre Dame Law Review

In recent years, two new fronts of attack on qualified immunity have emerged. This Essay responds to both and provides a qualified defense of qualified immunity. Part I addresses Will Baude’s argument that qualified immunity finds no support in positive law. Part II turns to Joanna Schwartz’s pioneering empirical work that has been marshaled to question qualified immunity’s effectiveness as a matter of policy.

These two sets of criticisms—a one-two punch that qualified immunity is both unlawful and ineffective—merit serious consideration and further investigation. Neither, however, is dispositive; there are important counterpoints that merit further ...


Qualified Immunity And Fault, John F. Preis Aug 2018

Qualified Immunity And Fault, John F. Preis

Notre Dame Law Review

This Essay describes, critiques, and attempts to reform the role of fault in the defense of qualified immunity. It first argues, in Part I, that the defense does not properly assess fault because it immunizes persons who are at fault and holds liable persons who are not. The chief cause of this problem is that the defense is focused on an exceedingly narrow source of law: appellate judicial opinions. Appellate opinions are, not surprisingly, rarely read by government officers and, even when their substance is communicated to officers, they only comprise one of many factors that affect the blameworthiness of ...


Qualified Immunity At Trial, Alexander A. Reinert Aug 2018

Qualified Immunity At Trial, Alexander A. Reinert

Notre Dame Law Review

Qualified immunity doctrine is complex and important, and for many years it was assumed to have an outsize impact on civil rights cases by imposing significant barriers to success for plaintiffs. Recent empirical work has cast that assumption into doubt, at least as to the impact qualified immunity has at pretrial stages of litigation. This Essay adds to this empirical work by evaluating the impact of qualified immunity at trial, a subject that to date has not been empirically tested. The results reported here suggest that juries are rarely asked to answer questions that bear on the qualified immunity defense ...


The Branch Best Qualified To Abolish Immunity, Scott Michelman Aug 2018

The Branch Best Qualified To Abolish Immunity, Scott Michelman

Notre Dame Law Review

Qualified immunity—the legal doctrine that shields government officials from suit for constitutional violations unless the right they violate “is sufficiently clear that every reasonable official would have understood that what he is doing violates that right”—has come under increasing judicial and scholarly criticism from diverse ideological viewpoints. This Essay considers the question of which branch of government should fix it. I take as a starting point the many critiques of qualified immunity and then turn to the question of whether courts should wait for Congress to reform this problematic doctrine. Do considerations of stare decisis or institutional competence ...


The Horror Chamber: Unqualified Impunity In Prison, David M. Shapiro, Charles Hogle Aug 2018

The Horror Chamber: Unqualified Impunity In Prison, David M. Shapiro, Charles Hogle

Notre Dame Law Review

The federal courts have been open to prisoners’ constitutional claims for half a century, but to this day, the availability of federal litigation has not stopped prisoners from being tortured, maimed, killed, or otherwise made to suffer chilling abuse. The failure of litigation as a deterrent is due in part to a confluence of legal and situational factors—doctrinal deference, statutory hurdles, and the many difficulties associated with litigating a civil rights case against one’s jailers—that make prison-conditions cases virtually impossible to win. We call this combination of factors “practical immunity.” Practical immunity amounts to a formidable barrier ...


Formalism, Ferguson, And The Future Of Qualified Immunity, Fred O. Smith Jr. Aug 2018

Formalism, Ferguson, And The Future Of Qualified Immunity, Fred O. Smith Jr.

Notre Dame Law Review

This Essay explores whether formalism and accountability are compatible lodestars as we steer toward a new future for qualified immunity. Ultimately, I argue that two existing proposals would bring the doctrine closer to its text and history, mitigate against fragmentation in the law of constitutional torts, and narrow the rights-remedies gap when government officials violate the Constitution. One proposal, by John Jeffries, would create a fault-based system, where government officials and entities alike would be liable for constitutional violations that are both unreasonable and unconstitutional. Another proposal would render governmental employers’ liable for the acts of their agents.


The Intractability Of Qualified Immunity, Alan K. Chen Aug 2018

The Intractability Of Qualified Immunity, Alan K. Chen

Notre Dame Law Review

This Essay offers an internal critique of qualified immunity law that explains why these problems remain intractable and why, unfortunately, there is little hope for resolution of the doctrine’s central dilemmas, short of either abandoning immunity or making it absolute. The Essay breaks down its discussion of qualified immunity into three distinct, but related, categories, and argues that the challenges presented within each category are difficult, if not impossible, to overcome. First, it addresses what can best be described as qualified immunity’s foundational jurisprudential tensions. Embedded in the doctrine are several first-level legal theory problems that can be ...


Qualified Immunity: Time To Change The Message, Karen M. Blum Aug 2018

Qualified Immunity: Time To Change The Message, Karen M. Blum

Notre Dame Law Review

This Essay will proceed in four parts. Parts I, II, and III will highlight, through some recent illustrative cases, areas where the qualified immunity defense has been especially ineffective and inefficient by: (Part I) hampering the development of constitutional law and impeding the redress of constitutional wrongs; (Part II) draining resources of litigants and courts through interlocutory appeals that are frequently without merit and often jurisdictionally suspect; and (Part III) breeding confusion into the roles of the judge and the jury in our judicial system, effectively enhancing the judge’s role at the expense of the constitutional right to jury ...


A Content Analysis Of Section 1983 Litigation Against Reserve Police Officers, Michael Broadus Aug 2018

A Content Analysis Of Section 1983 Litigation Against Reserve Police Officers, Michael Broadus

Master's Theses

Police studies have well developed a demonstrative framework for detailing risks which generate financially-detrimental civil litigation – particularly regarding 42 U.S.C. §1983. Conversely, though, police studies have given little attention to the often-used but differentially-trained reserve police officer. Primarily replicating the methodologies of Kappeler, Kappeler, and del Carmen (1993) and Ross (2000), this descriptive study sought to fill this void via a manifest content approach to purposively select a sample of Section 1983 cases decided by U.S. District Courts over a 16-year period (2001-2016) to determine: (1) if significant liability was generated by reserve officers, (2) the main ...


How Liability Insurers Protect Patients And Improve Safety, Tom Baker, Charles Silver Jul 2018

How Liability Insurers Protect Patients And Improve Safety, Tom Baker, Charles Silver

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Forty years after the publication of the first systematic study of adverse medical events, there is greater access to information about adverse medical events and increasingly widespread acceptance of the view that patient safety requires more than vigilance by well-intentioned medical professionals. In this essay, we describe some of the ways that medical liability insurance organizations contributed to this transformation, and we catalog the roles that those organizations play in promoting patient safety today. Whether liability insurance in fact discourages providers from improving safety or encourages them to protect patients from avoidable harms is an empirical question that a survey ...


New Heights, New Uses, And New Questions: Can Individuals Enforce Their Property Rights Against The Impending Rise Of Low-Flying Civilian Drones?, Thomas Carlton Jul 2018

New Heights, New Uses, And New Questions: Can Individuals Enforce Their Property Rights Against The Impending Rise Of Low-Flying Civilian Drones?, Thomas Carlton

Boston College Law Review

By 2020, there will be at least seven million civilian drones flying in the low-altitude airspace above the United States. Civilian drones include unmanned aerial vehicles operated by both private individuals for recreational and business entities for commercial purposes. While this budding technology has the potential to be a positive influence on society as a whole, civilian drone regulation at both the state and federal level lags behind growing drone usage across the country. As of now, the Federal Aviation Administration has administered a small rule that provides some regulation on the use of civilian drones. Many questions remain, however ...


Allocation Rules And The Stability Of Mass Tort Class Actions, Joshua C. Teitelbaum Jul 2018

Allocation Rules And The Stability Of Mass Tort Class Actions, Joshua C. Teitelbaum

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This paper studies the effects of allocation rules on the stability of mass tort class actions. I analyze a two-stage model in which a defendant faces multiple plaintiffs with heterogeneous damage claims. In stage 1, the plaintiffs play a noncooperative coalition formation game. In stage 2, the class action and any individual actions by opt-out plaintiffs are litigated or settled. I examine how the method for allocating the class recovery interacts with other factors---the shape of the damage claims distribution, the scale benefits of the class action, and the plaintiffs' probability of prevailing at trial and bargaining power in settlement ...


Jackson V. Dackman Co.: The Legislative Modification Of Common Law Tort Remedies Under Article 19 Of The Maryland Declaration Of Rights, Dan Friedman Jun 2018

Jackson V. Dackman Co.: The Legislative Modification Of Common Law Tort Remedies Under Article 19 Of The Maryland Declaration Of Rights, Dan Friedman

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


Take-Home Toxin: Following Kesner’S Lead And Creating A Consistent Framework For Determining Duty Toward Victims Of Secondary Asbestos Exposure, Brendan Kelly Jun 2018

Take-Home Toxin: Following Kesner’S Lead And Creating A Consistent Framework For Determining Duty Toward Victims Of Secondary Asbestos Exposure, Brendan Kelly

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


Amicus Brief, Lebron V. Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, Neil Vidmar, Tom Baker, Ralph L. Brill, Martha Chamallas, Stephen Daniels, Thomas A. Eaton, Theodore Eisenberg, Neal R. Feigenson, Lucinda M. Finley, Marc Galanter, Valerie P. Hans, Michael Heise, Edward J. Kionka, Thomas H. Koenig, Herbert M. Kritzer, David I. Levine, Nancy S. Marder, Joanne Martin, Frank M. Mcclellan, Deborah Jones Merritt, Philip G. Peters, Jr., James T. Richardson, Charles Silver, Richard W. Wright Jun 2018

Amicus Brief, Lebron V. Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, Neil Vidmar, Tom Baker, Ralph L. Brill, Martha Chamallas, Stephen Daniels, Thomas A. Eaton, Theodore Eisenberg, Neal R. Feigenson, Lucinda M. Finley, Marc Galanter, Valerie P. Hans, Michael Heise, Edward J. Kionka, Thomas H. Koenig, Herbert M. Kritzer, David I. Levine, Nancy S. Marder, Joanne Martin, Frank M. Mcclellan, Deborah Jones Merritt, Philip G. Peters, Jr., James T. Richardson, Charles Silver, Richard W. Wright

Nancy S. Marder

Illinois Public Act 82-280, § 2-1706.5, as amended by P.A. 94-677, § 330 (eff. Aug. 25, 2005), and as codified as 735 ILCS 5/2-1706.5(a), imposes a $500,000 “cap” on the noneconomic damages that may be awarded in a medical malpractice suit against a physician or other health care professional, and a $1 million “cap” on the noneconomic damages that may be awarded against a hospital, its affiliates, or their employees.

This brief will address two of the questions presented for review by the parties:

1. Does the cap violate the Illinois Constitution’s prohibition on “special ...


Out Of Thin Air: Trade Secrets, Cybersecurity, And The Wrongful Acquisition Tort, Sharon Sandeen Jun 2018

Out Of Thin Air: Trade Secrets, Cybersecurity, And The Wrongful Acquisition Tort, Sharon Sandeen

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


The Naked Truth: Insufficient Coverage For Revenge Porn Victims At State Law And The Proposed Federal Legislation To Adequately Redress Them, Meghan Fay May 2018

The Naked Truth: Insufficient Coverage For Revenge Porn Victims At State Law And The Proposed Federal Legislation To Adequately Redress Them, Meghan Fay

Boston College Law Review

The distribution of revenge porn is a cyber-bullying phenomenon that has proliferated on the Internet. The nonconsensual sharing of sexually explicit photographs and videos causes irreparable harm to revenge porn victims. The current state of the law, however, does little to redress the damage. Tort claims are often unsuccessful because many victims do not have the resources necessary to initiate a lawsuit. Furthermore, federal law grants operators of revenge porn websites immunity from state tort claims. In an effort to fill this gap in the law, many states have made changes or additions to their criminal statutes. To date, thirty-eight ...


What’S In A Name?: Proving Actual Damages For Reputational Harm In Texas Defamation Cases Will Only Get Harder, Austin Brakebill May 2018

What’S In A Name?: Proving Actual Damages For Reputational Harm In Texas Defamation Cases Will Only Get Harder, Austin Brakebill

SMU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Keep Suing All The Lawyers: Recent Developments In Claims Against Lawyers For Aiding & Abetting A Client’S Breach Of Fiduciary Duty, Katerina P. Lewinbuk May 2018

Keep Suing All The Lawyers: Recent Developments In Claims Against Lawyers For Aiding & Abetting A Client’S Breach Of Fiduciary Duty, Katerina P. Lewinbuk

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Lawyers have increasingly become subject to liability under various legal theories, ranging from traditional legal malpractice or negligence liability claims to various third-party actions. Most recently, state and federal courts across the country have recognized attorney liability for aiding and abetting a client’s breach of fiduciary duty. This Article will address the current status of the cause of action for a lawyer’s aiding and abetting her client’s breach of fiduciary duty, explain the commonalities and distinguish nuances as outlined by particular states, examine recent decisions by federal courts that have recognized the cause of action, and culminate ...


Tort Liability And Unawareness, Surajeet Chakravarty, David Kelsey, Joshua C. Teitelbaum May 2018

Tort Liability And Unawareness, Surajeet Chakravarty, David Kelsey, Joshua C. Teitelbaum

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Unawareness is a form of bounded rationality where a person fails to conceive all feasible acts or consequences or to perceive as feasible all conceivable act-consequence links. We study the implications of unawareness for tort law, where relevant examples include the discovery of a new product or technology (new act), of a new disease or injury (new consequence), or that a product can cause an injury (new link). We argue that negligence has an important advantage over strict liability in a world with unawareness—negligence, through the stipulation of due care standards, spreads awareness about the updated probability of harm.