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Retirement Security Law Commons

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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Retirement Security Law

Reforming Retirement Systems: Why The French Have Succeeded When Americans Have Not, Kathryn L. Moore Jul 2005

Reforming Retirement Systems: Why The French Have Succeeded When Americans Have Not, Kathryn L. Moore

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

In order to understand why the American Social Security system has been so resistant to change while the retirement systems in other countries have been amended, this Article analyzes why one country, France, was able to reform its retirement system significantly in 2003. The Article begins by briefly describing the French retirement system prior to 2003. It then provides an overview of the most significant changes wrought by the reform enacted in 2003. It then analyses why, after years of inaction and failed attempts to reform the French retirement system, the government succeeded in reforming the retirement system in 2003 ...


Retaining Life Tenure: The Case For A “Golden Parachute”, David R. Stras, Ryan W. Scott Jan 2005

Retaining Life Tenure: The Case For A “Golden Parachute”, David R. Stras, Ryan W. Scott

Washington University Law Review

The first vacancies on the Supreme Court in eleven years have sparked renewed debate about the continued viability of life tenure for federal judges. Scholars have decried life tenure as one of the Framers' worst blunders, pointing to issues such as strategic retirement, longer average tenure, and widespread mental infirmity of Justices. In this Article, the authors argue that, notwithstanding the serious problem of mental and physical infirmity on the Court, life tenure should be retained. They also argue that recent statutory proposals to eliminate or undermine life tenure, for example through a mandatory retirement age or term limits, are ...


Lessons From The French Funding Debate, Kathryn L. Moore Jan 2004

Lessons From The French Funding Debate, Kathryn L. Moore

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

The French retirement system, like the American social security system, is facing long-term funding difficulties. As a result, the French are debating whether to expand the role of pre-funded retirement plans. The economic arguments presented in this debate are virtually identical to the economic arguments presented in the American debate on whether the American social security system should be partially privatized.

The French and American debates, however, diverge once history and ideology are considered. The French have a history of failed funded pensions in contrast to the United States where the failure of prominent underfunded pension led to the enactment ...


The Best Of Times And The Worst Of Times: Lessons From Recent Reforms Of The French Retirement System, Kathryn L. Moore Jan 2001

The Best Of Times And The Worst Of Times: Lessons From Recent Reforms Of The French Retirement System, Kathryn L. Moore

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Principally because of increasing life expectancy and the fact that the baby boom generation is reaching retirement age and is followed by a much smaller generation, the American social security system is facing a long-term funding deficit. The Board of Trustees of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors and Disability Trust Funds predicts that unless corrective action is taken, social security benefits will exceed dedicated tax revenues by the year 2016, and the social security system will become insolvent, that is, unable to pay benefits in full, by the year 2038.

The United States is not alone in facing these circumstances ...


Closing The Gap: Safeguarding Participants' Rights By Expanding The Federal Common Law Of Erisa, Jayne Elizabeth Zanglein Jan 1994

Closing The Gap: Safeguarding Participants' Rights By Expanding The Federal Common Law Of Erisa, Jayne Elizabeth Zanglein

Washington University Law Review

This Article will explore the current boundaries of the federal common law of ERISA and will urge the expansion of these boundaries to protect plan participants who have been betrayed without a remedy.


Erisa And The Language Of Preemption, Jay Conison Jan 1994

Erisa And The Language Of Preemption, Jay Conison

Washington University Law Review

This Article has two aims: first, to show that there is indeed little to guide courts in interpreting section 514(a), and second, to show that despite this lack of guidance, courts can still apply the provision rationally.


Implementing Erisa: Of Policies And “Plans”, Peter J. Wiedenbeck Jan 1994

Implementing Erisa: Of Policies And “Plans”, Peter J. Wiedenbeck

Washington University Law Review

There have been dramatic changes in the benefits field since the passage of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). Most notably, employers' cutbacks in health insurance coverage and cost shifting in response to escalating medical care costs have spawned the current national debate over health care reform.19 Less visible, but similarly consequential, is the proliferation of special statutory exclusions from gross income for a variety of fringe benefits.


Machiavelli And The Politics Of Welfare, National Health, And Old Age: A Comparative Perspective Of The Policies Of The United States And Canada, Camilla Watson Jan 1993

Machiavelli And The Politics Of Welfare, National Health, And Old Age: A Comparative Perspective Of The Policies Of The United States And Canada, Camilla Watson

Scholarly Works

This Article maintains that in order to fully comprehend the politics of welfare, retirement security, and national health coverage, it is necessary to examine Machiavellian principles in relation to the variables of economic development and inter-party competition. If the principles of Machiavelli are applied in a slightly different and more constructive manner, they may facilitate reform of the American welfare, retirement, and national health systems. Now that the political balance in the United States has shifted from the conservative to the liberal, the time is ripe to consider reforming the entire Social Security system and instituting a comprehensive national health ...


Federal Jurisdiction Not Present When State Seeks Declaration That Federal Law Does Not Preempt State's Regulations, Franchise Tax Board V. Construction Laborers Vacation Trust, 103 S. Ct. 2481 (1983), J. Douglas Wilson Jan 1984

Federal Jurisdiction Not Present When State Seeks Declaration That Federal Law Does Not Preempt State's Regulations, Franchise Tax Board V. Construction Laborers Vacation Trust, 103 S. Ct. 2481 (1983), J. Douglas Wilson

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Regulation Of Multiple Employer Trusts: Past, Present & Future, Edward A. Scallet Jan 1983

The Regulation Of Multiple Employer Trusts: Past, Present & Future, Edward A. Scallet

Washington University Law Review

It can be persuasively argued that the recognized abuses in ERISA pension plans are no more severe than those appearing in welfare plans, and that welfare abuses have a significant adverse effect on millions of employees. Nevertheless, application of ERISA in this area has been hampered by several difficult issues, most of which are traceable to a lack of congressional precision in designing enforcement mechanisms specific to welfare plans, and more importantly, to inadequate coordination of state and federal responsibility in this area. This Article examines this problem by discussing the congressional, judicial and regulatory experience with one type of ...


Erisa Preemption Of State Law: The Meaning Of “Relate To” In Section 514, Stephen R. Snodgrass Jan 1980

Erisa Preemption Of State Law: The Meaning Of “Relate To” In Section 514, Stephen R. Snodgrass

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.