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Full-Text Articles in Other Law

Prosecuting Worker Endangerment: The Need For Stronger Criminal Penalties For Violations Of The Occupational Safety And Health Act, David M. Uhlmann Jan 2009

Prosecuting Worker Endangerment: The Need For Stronger Criminal Penalties For Violations Of The Occupational Safety And Health Act, David M. Uhlmann

Articles

A recent spate of construction deaths in New York City, similar incidents in Las Vegas, and scores of fatalities in recent years at mines and industrial facilities across the country have highlighted the need for greater commitment to worker safety in the United States and stronger penalties for violators of the worker safety laws. Approximately 6,000 workers are killed on the job each year1—and thousands more suffer grievous injuries—yet penalties for worker safety violations remain appallingly small, and criminal prosecutions are almost non-existent. In recent years, most of the criminal prosecutions for worker safety violations have been ...


Does Nonprofit Ownership Matter?, Jill R. Horwitz Jan 2007

Does Nonprofit Ownership Matter?, Jill R. Horwitz

Articles

In recent years, policymakers have increasingly questioned whether nonprofit institutions, particularly hospitals, merit tax exemption. They argue that nonprofit hospitals differ little from their for-profit counterparts in the provision of charity care and, therefore, should either lose their tax-exempt status or adhere to new, strict, and specific requirements to provide free services for the poor. In this Article, I present evidence that hospital ownership-whether it is for-profit, nonprofit, or government owned-has a significant effect on the mix of medical services it offers. Despite notoriously weak enforcement mechanisms, nonprofit hospitals act in the public interest by providing services that are unlikely ...


Seeking Truth For Power: Informational Strategy And Regulatory Policymaking, Edward A. Parson, Cary Coglianese, Richard Zeckhauser Jan 2004

Seeking Truth For Power: Informational Strategy And Regulatory Policymaking, Edward A. Parson, Cary Coglianese, Richard Zeckhauser

Articles

Information is the lifeblood of regulatory policy. The effective use of governmental power depends on information about conditions in the world, strategies for improving those conditions, and the consequences associated with deploying different strategies. Indeed, this need for information has led legislatures to create specialized committee structures, delegate policy authority to expert agencies, and develop administrative procedures that encourage analysis. Although legal scholars have extensively debated procedures and reforms designed to improve the analytic and scientific basis of regulatory policymaking, they have paid relatively little attention to how regulators gain the information they need for making and implementing regulatory policy ...


What Counts Is How The Game Is Scored: One Way To Increase Achievement In Learning Mathematics, Layman E. Allen, Gloria Jackson, Joan Ross, Stuart White Jan 1978

What Counts Is How The Game Is Scored: One Way To Increase Achievement In Learning Mathematics, Layman E. Allen, Gloria Jackson, Joan Ross, Stuart White

Articles

Pior investigation indicates that instructional gaming can be an effective tool for enhancing both motivation and achievement in the learning of mathematics. This study explores the extent to which the effectiveness of instructional gaming in facilitating the learning of specific mathematical ideas can be increased by incorporating devices that channel learners’ attention upon those ideas. In particular, the effect of channeling attention by changing the method of scoring is explored.


Equations Presented As An Example Of A Nonsimulation Game, Layman E. Allen, Joan K. Ross Jan 1972

Equations Presented As An Example Of A Nonsimulation Game, Layman E. Allen, Joan K. Ross

Articles

One way of characterizing instructional games is in terms of whether they are simulation games or nonsimulation games. Most ofSimulation Gaming News deals with simulation games and other simulations; here we are concerned with nonsimulation games.


The Virtues Of Nonsimulation Games, Layman E. Allen, Robert W. Allen, Joan Ross Jan 1970

The Virtues Of Nonsimulation Games, Layman E. Allen, Robert W. Allen, Joan Ross

Articles

The use of games as teaching devices is receiving attention from an increasing number of educators. Data from tests conducted with one such educational game-WFF ’N PROOF strongly indicate that this and similar games are useful, not only in teaching a particular subject (in this case symbolic logic), but also in increasing the general problem-solving ability of the student. WFF ’N PROOF is actually not one game but a series of 21 games of increasing difficulty. The first games in the series are quite simple and can be enjoyed by first graders. The final games are challenging and stimulating even ...


The Liability Of Charitable Corporations For The Torts Of Their Servants, Harry B. Hutchins Jan 1907

The Liability Of Charitable Corporations For The Torts Of Their Servants, Harry B. Hutchins

Articles

The Liability of Charitable Corporations for the Torts of their Servants.--This question was discussed quite fully in the last number of the REVIEW, pp. 552-559, under the title Liability of Hospitals for the Negligence of their Physicians and Nurses, particular attention being given to the reasons underlying the doctrine that charitable corporations are not liable for the negligence of their servants, provided proper care has been exercised in their selection, and to the limitations within which that doctrine should be confined. It was concluded that the true reason for the doctrine is not to be found, as many cases ...


The Cy-Pres Doctrine, Harry B. Hutchins Jan 1906

The Cy-Pres Doctrine, Harry B. Hutchins

Articles

The CY-Pres Doctrine.-The court of chancery of New Jersey in the recent case of Brow et al. v. Condit et al. (Sept. 30, 1905), 61 Atl. Rep. 1055, refused to apply this doctrine under the following circumstances: The will of one Susan M. Corson, bearing date July 7, 1897, disposed of her residuary estate "to the Hospital Fund for Sick Seamen at Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York, care of Mr. John M. Wood, chaplain." It appears that neither at the time of the making of the will nor at any time thereafter was there a fund in existence at ...