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Full-Text Articles in Legal Profession

Overcoming Writer's Block And Procrastination For Attorneys, Law Students, And Law Professors, David A. Rasch, Meehan Rasch Jun 2013

Overcoming Writer's Block And Procrastination For Attorneys, Law Students, And Law Professors, David A. Rasch, Meehan Rasch

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Legal writers face unique challenges. Law is a particularly writing-heavy profession. However, lawyers, law students, and law professors often struggle with initiating, sustaining, and completing legal writing projects. This article provides a guide for legal writers who are seeking to understand and resolve writing blocks, procrastination, and other common writing productivity problems.


Understanding The Procrastination Cycle, Meehan Rasch, David A. Rasch Jun 2013

Understanding The Procrastination Cycle, Meehan Rasch, David A. Rasch

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Procrastination is one of the enduring challenges of human existence, as well as one of the chief problems with which law students struggle. Understanding the cycle of procrastination can help law professors and advisors more constructively address students' issues in this area -- not to mention our own.


Ripples Against The Other Shore: The Impact Of Trauma Exposure On The Immigration Process Through Adjudicators, Kate Aschenbrenner Jan 2013

Ripples Against The Other Shore: The Impact Of Trauma Exposure On The Immigration Process Through Adjudicators, Kate Aschenbrenner

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Behavioral Legal Ethics, Jean R. Sternlight, Jennifer K. Robbennolt Jan 2013

Behavioral Legal Ethics, Jean R. Sternlight, Jennifer K. Robbennolt

Scholarly Works

Complaints about lawyers’ ethics are commonplace. While it is surely the case that some attorneys deliberately choose to engage in misconduct, psychological research suggests a more complex story. It is not only “bad apples” who are unethical. Instead, ethical lapses can occur more easily and less intentionally than we might imagine. In this paper, we examine the ethical “blind spots,” slippery slopes, and “ethical fading” that may lead good people to behave badly. We then explore specific aspects of legal practice that can present particularly difficult challenges for lawyers given the nature of behavioral ethics - complex and ambiguous ethical rules ...