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Full-Text Articles in Legal Profession

Keeping Pace With Technology-Driven Profession, Jodi Nafzger Sep 2013

Keeping Pace With Technology-Driven Profession, Jodi Nafzger

Faculty Scholarship

With the increasing use of E-discovery and paperless judicial systems, members of the legal profession must consider new methods for managing the overwhelming volume of information and be competent with the emerging technologies at the center of modern law practice. It is also increasingly clear that law schools must teach the technology of law practice. The ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct call for law school curriculum which familiarizes aspiring lawyers with important technology tools. With practical skills training in the use of effective technology tools, the next generation of lawyers can bring an enhanced mastery of business and technology ...


The Teaching Of Procedure Across Common Law Systems, Erik S. Knusten, Thomas D. Rowe Jr., David Bamford, Shirley Shipman Jan 2013

The Teaching Of Procedure Across Common Law Systems, Erik S. Knusten, Thomas D. Rowe Jr., David Bamford, Shirley Shipman

Faculty Scholarship

What difference does the teaching of procedure make to legal education, legal scholarship, the legal profession, and civil justice reform? This first of four articles on the teaching of procedure canvasses the landscape of current approaches to the teaching of procedure in four legal systems—the United States, Canada, Australia, and England and Wales—surveying the place of procedure in the law school curriculum and in professional training, the kinds of subjects that “procedure” encompasses, and the various ways in which procedure is learned. Little sustained reflection has been carried out as to the import and impact of this longstanding ...


Oh, The Treatise!, Richard A. Danner Jan 2013

Oh, The Treatise!, Richard A. Danner

Faculty Scholarship

This foreword to the Michigan Law Review’s 2013 Survey of Books Related to the Law considers the history of the American legal treatise in light of the well-known criticisms of legal scholarship published by Judge Harry Edwards in 1992. As part of his critique, Edwards characterized the legal treatise as “[t]he paradigm of ‘practical’ legal scholarship.” In his words, treatises “create an interpretive framework; categorize the mass of legal authorities in terms of this framework; interpret closely the various authoritative texts within each category; and thereby demonstrate for judges or practitioners what ‘the law’ requires.” Part I examines ...