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Full-Text Articles in Legal Profession

Justadvice: Studying Law In Snapshots, Brenda Bratton Blom, Leigh Maddox Aug 2013

Justadvice: Studying Law In Snapshots, Brenda Bratton Blom, Leigh Maddox

Faculty Scholarship

Access to legal services continues to be a critical need in the United States. Clinical programs in law schools are part of responding to the demand for these services, but often face the challenge of filling gaps left by larger programs serving the poor or responding to unique legal needs. JustAdvice was designed to provide limited advice to a broad range of people with legal needs, unbundling those services where possible. The story of the development, implementation and transformation of the program into a teaching, triage and referral system that importantly links multiple organizations and services is the core of ...


Constructing Modern-Day U.S. Legal Education With Rhetoric: Langdell, Ames, And The Scholar Model Of The Law Professor Persona, Carlo A. Pedrioli Jan 2013

Constructing Modern-Day U.S. Legal Education With Rhetoric: Langdell, Ames, And The Scholar Model Of The Law Professor Persona, Carlo A. Pedrioli

Faculty Scholarship

This article explains how lawyers like Christopher Columbus Langdell and James Barr Ames, a disciple of Langdell, employed rhetoric between 1870, when Langdell assumed the deanship at Harvard Law School, and 1920, when law had emerged as a credible academic field in the United States, to construct a persona, that of a scholar, appropriate for the law professor situated within the university. To do so, the article contextualizes the rhetoric with historical background on the law professor and legal education, draws upon rhetorical theory to give an overview of persona theory and persona analysis as a means of conducting the ...


Using A Cultural Lens In The Law School Classroom To Stimulate Self-Assessment, 48 Gonz. L. Rev. 365 (2013), Julie M. Spanbauer Jan 2013

Using A Cultural Lens In The Law School Classroom To Stimulate Self-Assessment, 48 Gonz. L. Rev. 365 (2013), Julie M. Spanbauer

Faculty Scholarship

The American Bar Association is exerting pressure on United States law schools to improve teaching effectiveness by shifting the evaluation of student learning away from input measures to focus upon output-based assessments. Yet, many legal educators appear to be resistant to and fearful of change, in part, perhaps, due to their comfort with teaching methods such as the Socratic or case-dialogue approach, which demands little accountability for teaching effectiveness and provides more time for the pursuit of the traditional goals of scholarly productivity. This method of teaching as currently utilized in law schools is also innately professor-centric performance art. The ...


Why Environmental Law Clinics?, Adam Babich, Jane F. Barrett Jan 2013

Why Environmental Law Clinics?, Adam Babich, Jane F. Barrett

Faculty Scholarship

The law clinic has become an increasingly important part of legal education, giving students the opportunity to learn practical skills as well as to internalize core legal values. Pedagogical concerns preclude clinics from letting fear of criticism drive decisions about how they represent clients. The legal profession's idealistic aspirations pose challenges, and political attacks have answered clinicians' efforts to live up to these aspirations. An error underlies such attacks, however: holding lawyers responsible for their clients' legal positions despite the profession's duty to ensure that such positions get a fair hearing.


Towards Engaged Scholarship, Nestor M. Davidson Jan 2013

Towards Engaged Scholarship, Nestor M. Davidson

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


It's Not Just For Death Cases Anymore: How Capital Mitigation Investigation Can Enhance Experiential Learning And Improve Advocacy In Law School Non-Capital Criminal Defense Clinics, 50 Cal. W. L. Rev. 31 (2013), Hugh Mundy Jan 2013

It's Not Just For Death Cases Anymore: How Capital Mitigation Investigation Can Enhance Experiential Learning And Improve Advocacy In Law School Non-Capital Criminal Defense Clinics, 50 Cal. W. L. Rev. 31 (2013), Hugh Mundy

Faculty Scholarship

As this article proposes, law school criminal defense clinics provide an excellent environment to design and implement a non-capital mitigation investigation protocol based on the techniques used in death penalty cases. From a pedagogical perspective, such a model promotes student development of foundational lawyering skills and values, especially in the vital area of “narrative thinking characteristic of everyday practice.” From a pragmatic standpoint, creation of a mitigation investigation model benefits clinic clients and boosts the likelihood that similar investigative methods will become a staple of the student's post-graduate practice.

Part I charts the evolution of capital mitigation investigation and ...


Educating Main Street Lawyers, Luz E. Herrera Jan 2013

Educating Main Street Lawyers, Luz E. Herrera

Faculty Scholarship

Discussion about the value of a law degree has focused on the financial success of lawyers. Both defenders and critics of the existing legal education model largely ignore the implications that the cost of legal education and high lawyer fees have on access to justice. While a lawyer’s ability to make a decent living must be addressed when determining the value of a legal education, we fail to take into account the fact that there are millions of individuals in the U.S. who cannot find a lawyer to represent them when they need one. For advocates who believe ...


The Fully Formed Lawyer: Why Law Schools Should Require Public Service To Better Prepare Students For Private Practice, Sara Rankin Jan 2013

The Fully Formed Lawyer: Why Law Schools Should Require Public Service To Better Prepare Students For Private Practice, Sara Rankin

Faculty Scholarship

It is now commonly accepted that law schools are graduating students who are under-prepared for practice in the real world. In other words, students that perform adequately in the classroom seem to struggle or suffer — to an unnecessary degree — when they enter practice. It is as though law schools are graduating inchoate or “partially-formed” lawyers, who demonstrate classroom fluency but lack meaningful ability to grapple with the wrinkles and complexity of real-world practice. This article argues that to create practice-ready or “fully formed” lawyers, law schools should reform to prioritize hands-on training in public service. It may seem counterintuitive to ...


The Teaching Of Procedure Across Common Law Systems, Erik S. Knusten, Thomas D. Rowe Jr., David Bamford, Shirley Shipman Jan 2013

The Teaching Of Procedure Across Common Law Systems, Erik S. Knusten, Thomas D. Rowe Jr., David Bamford, Shirley Shipman

Faculty Scholarship

What difference does the teaching of procedure make to legal education, legal scholarship, the legal profession, and civil justice reform? This first of four articles on the teaching of procedure canvasses the landscape of current approaches to the teaching of procedure in four legal systems—the United States, Canada, Australia, and England and Wales—surveying the place of procedure in the law school curriculum and in professional training, the kinds of subjects that “procedure” encompasses, and the various ways in which procedure is learned. Little sustained reflection has been carried out as to the import and impact of this longstanding ...


The Price Of Legal Education, Paul D. Carrington Jan 2013

The Price Of Legal Education, Paul D. Carrington

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.