Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal Profession Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Legal Profession

Institutional Bridging: How Large Law Firms Engage In Globalization, John Flood May 2013

Institutional Bridging: How Large Law Firms Engage In Globalization, John Flood

Boston College Law Review

This Article introduces the “Born Global” concept into the discussion of law firms and lawyers. Born Global firms are companies that globalize at an accelerated rate. This Article illustrates that English and American law firms are the precursors to Born Global companies and highlights how the common law facilitated this process. It also demonstrates, through modern case studies, how lawyers and the common law continue to have a globalizing effect in the business world. Last, the Article argues that the disparity between U.K. and U.S. law firms created by the U.K. Legal Services Act of 2007 may ...


The Rise Of The Corporate Legal Elite In The Brics: Implications For Global Governance, David B. Wilkins, Mihaela Papa May 2013

The Rise Of The Corporate Legal Elite In The Brics: Implications For Global Governance, David B. Wilkins, Mihaela Papa

Boston College Law Review

Both international relations scholars interested in the future of global governance and sociologists of the legal profession studying the globalization of the legal services market are devoting increasing attention to rising powers, particularly the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa). Yet very little of this rich literature addresses the intersection between these two theoretical domains. In this Article, we explore one such intersection that is likely to be increasingly important in the coming years: the role that the new corporate legal elite emerging within the BRICS countries will play in shaping global governance. We conceptualize three processes through ...


Unregulated Internal Investigations: Achieving Fairness For Corporate Constituents, Bruce A. Green, Ellen S. Podgor Jan 2013

Unregulated Internal Investigations: Achieving Fairness For Corporate Constituents, Bruce A. Green, Ellen S. Podgor

Boston College Law Review

This Article focuses on the relationship between corporations and their employee constituents in the context of corporate internal investigations, an unregulated multimillion-dollar business. The classic approach provided in the 1981 Supreme Court opinion, Upjohn v. United States, is contrasted with the reality of modern-day internal investigations that may exploit individuals to achieve a corporate benefit with the government. Attorney-client privilege becomes an issue as corporate constituents perceive that corporate counsel is representing their interests, when in fact these internal investigators are obtaining information for the corporation to barter with the government. Legal precedent and ethics rules provide little relief to ...