Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal Profession Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Legal Profession

Rodrigo's Riposte: The Mismatch Theory Of Law School Admissions, Richard Delgado Aug 2007

Rodrigo's Riposte: The Mismatch Theory Of Law School Admissions, Richard Delgado

University of Pittsburgh School of Law Working Paper Series

The chronicle proceeds as a dialogue between the fictional alter ego, Rodrigo Crenshaw, and an older professor. After meeting in Rodrigo’s city, the two friends, joined later by “Giannina,” go out to dinner. Rodrigo, who is on his law school’s admissions committee, has been thinking about affirmative action.

Prompted by his conservative colleague “Laz,” Rodrigo has formulated a several-pronged attack on Sander’s premise that “stairstep” admissions (and, later, law firm hiring) just hurts the cause of black lawyers.

The professor presses Rodrigo to defend his views, and the arrival of Giannina requires him to articulate them even ...


How Lawyers Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds (Duke University Press 2005), Jean Stefancic, Richard Delgado Nov 2005

How Lawyers Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds (Duke University Press 2005), Jean Stefancic, Richard Delgado

University of Pittsburgh School of Law Working Paper Series

This is an excerpt from How Lawyer’s Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds. Professors Jean Stefancic and Richard Delgado use historical investigation and critical analysis to diagnose the cause of the pervasive unhappiness among practicing lawyers. Most previous writers have blamed the high rate of burnout, depression, divorce, and drug and alcohol dependency among these highly paid professionals on the narrow specialization, long hours, and intense pressures of modern legal practice. Stefancic and Delgado argue that these professional demands are only symptoms of a deeper problem: the way lawyers are taught to think and reason. They ...