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Faculty Scholarship

Alternative dispute resolution

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Full-Text Articles in Legal Profession

What Happens When Mediation Is Institutionalized?: To The Parties, Practitioners, And Host Institutions, James J. Alfini, John Barkai, Robert Baruch Bush, Michele Hermann, Jonathan Hyman, Kimberlee Kovach, Carol B. Liebman, Sharon Press, Leonard Riskin Jan 1994

What Happens When Mediation Is Institutionalized?: To The Parties, Practitioners, And Host Institutions, James J. Alfini, John Barkai, Robert Baruch Bush, Michele Hermann, Jonathan Hyman, Kimberlee Kovach, Carol B. Liebman, Sharon Press, Leonard Riskin

Faculty Scholarship

The Alternative Dispute Resolution Section of the Association of American Law Schools presented a program, at the 1994 AALS Conference, on the institutionalization of mediation – through courtconnected programs and otherwise. The topic is an important one, because this phenomenon has become increasingly common in recent years. Moreover, the topic seemed especially appropriate for the 1994 program, since Florida – the host state for the conference – was one of the first states to adopt a comprehensive statute providing for court-ordered mediation (at the trial judge's option) in civil disputes of all kinds. The move toward institutionalizing mediation has raised many questions ...


Teaching Mediation As A Lawyering Role Developments, Jacqueline Nolan-Haley Jan 1989

Teaching Mediation As A Lawyering Role Developments, Jacqueline Nolan-Haley

Faculty Scholarship

The growth of the alternative dispute resolution (ADR) movement has generated an increased interest in the study and practice of mediation as a nonadversarial method of conflict resolution. With mediation, individuals settle their disputes using a neutral third party who has no power to impose a settlement. Historically, mediation has been widely neglected in legal education, and-except for those involved in the labor field-lawyers have not practiced it. Recent gains in visibility have not necessarily resulted in widespread acceptance of mediation. In fact, mediation has even been openly resisted by some members of the legal profession.