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Full-Text Articles in Legal Profession

Professional Judgment In An Era Of Artificial Intelligence And Machine Learning, Frank A. Pasquale Jan 2019

Professional Judgment In An Era Of Artificial Intelligence And Machine Learning, Frank A. Pasquale

Faculty Scholarship

Though artificial intelligence (AI) in healthcare and education now accomplishes diverse tasks, there are two features that tend to unite the information processing behind efforts to substitute it for professionals in these fields: reductionism and functionalism. True believers in substitutive automation tend to model work in human services by reducing the professional role to a set of behaviors initiated by some stimulus, which are intended to accomplish some predetermined goal, or maximize some measure of well-being. However, true professional judgment hinges on a way of knowing the world that is at odds with the epistemology of substitutive automation. Instead of ...


Love's Labors Found, Nicholas Allard Jan 2019

Love's Labors Found, Nicholas Allard

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Law's Enterprise: Argumentation Schemes & Legal Analogy, Brian N. Larson Jan 2019

Law's Enterprise: Argumentation Schemes & Legal Analogy, Brian N. Larson

Faculty Scholarship

Reasoning by legal analogy has been described as mystical, reframed by skeptics using the deductive syllogism, and called “no kind of reasoning at all” by Judge Posner. Arguments by legal analogy happen every day in courtrooms, law offices, and law-school classrooms, and they are the essence of what we mean when we talk of thinking like a lawyer. But we have no productive and normative theory for creating and evaluating them. Entries in the debate over the last 25 years by Professors Sunstein, Schauer, Brewer, Weinreb, and others leave us at an impasse: The ‘skeptics’ are too focused on the ...


The Rise Of The Creative Law School, Gregory W. Bowman Jan 2019

The Rise Of The Creative Law School, Gregory W. Bowman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Rule Of Persons, Not Machines: The Limits Of Legal Automation, Frank A. Pasquale Jan 2018

A Rule Of Persons, Not Machines: The Limits Of Legal Automation, Frank A. Pasquale

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Preparing Law Students In The Wake Of #Metoo, Paula A. Monopoli Jan 2018

Preparing Law Students In The Wake Of #Metoo, Paula A. Monopoli

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Teaching Bioethics: The Role Of Empathy & Humility In The Teaching And Practice Of Law, Barbara A. Noah Jan 2018

Teaching Bioethics: The Role Of Empathy & Humility In The Teaching And Practice Of Law, Barbara A. Noah

Faculty Scholarship

This essay considers the role of empathy and humility in the professional practices of physicians and lawyers and in those who prepare students for these professions. Beginning with an overview of the goals and methods of legal education, it compares similar goals in medical education and the value of practicing law (and medicine) with empathy and humility. The essay then describes exercises used in the law school classroom designed both to teach law students about end-of-life law and also to allow them to practice counseling clients. Through these exercises, law students can experience firsthand the challenges of advising a client ...


Developing Workplace Law Programming: A Labor Of Love, Michael Z. Green Jan 2018

Developing Workplace Law Programming: A Labor Of Love, Michael Z. Green

Faculty Scholarship

Professor Green reflects and comments on his work in developing workplace law programming as a key component of the annual SEALS program.


Southeast Of What: Reflections On Seals' Success, Thomas B. Metzloff Jan 2018

Southeast Of What: Reflections On Seals' Success, Thomas B. Metzloff

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Community Law Practice, Luz E. Herrera Jan 2018

Community Law Practice, Luz E. Herrera

Faculty Scholarship

Community-embedded law practices are small businesses that are crucial in addressing the legal needs that arise in neighborhoods. Lawyers in these practices attend to recurring legal needs, contribute to building a diverse profession, and spur community development of modest-income communities through legal education and services. Solo practitioners and small firm lawyers represent the largest segment of the lawyer population in the United States, yet their contributions to addressing the legal needs of modest-income clients are rarely recognized or studied. This essay sheds light on the characteristics, motivations, and challenges these law practices face in providing access to justice to modest-means ...


Ask A Director: Reporting Accomplishments, Caroline L. Osborne Jan 2018

Ask A Director: Reporting Accomplishments, Caroline L. Osborne

Faculty Scholarship

None available.


Securing Professional Development: Getting To Yes, Caroline L. Osborne, Carol A. Watson, Amy J. Eaton Jan 2018

Securing Professional Development: Getting To Yes, Caroline L. Osborne, Carol A. Watson, Amy J. Eaton

Faculty Scholarship

None available.


Professionalism And Ethics Section Takes Its Turn, Jodi Nafzger Sep 2017

Professionalism And Ethics Section Takes Its Turn, Jodi Nafzger

Faculty Scholarship

Membership in [the Professionalism and Ethics Section of the Idaho State Bar] provides Idaho attorneys an opportunity to work closely with colleagues who share a vision for a profession that embodies personal courtesy and professional and ethical integrity. We are fortunate to practice law in a state that values this vision, and we invite you to attend our CLEs [Continuing Legal Education] and join our membership. [excerpt]


Communication Conundrums: Theories About And Tips For Effective Decanal Communication, 48 U. Tol. L. Rev. 211 (2017), Darby Dickerson, Marjorie Buckner Jan 2017

Communication Conundrums: Theories About And Tips For Effective Decanal Communication, 48 U. Tol. L. Rev. 211 (2017), Darby Dickerson, Marjorie Buckner

Faculty Scholarship

Clear and effective communication is essential for any organization, including a law school, to operate effectively. But communication is often one of the trickiest skills a law dean must seek to master. Once a person adds “Dean” to the front of his or her name, communication norms change. A dean must be sensitive to power structures—whether real or perceived— that exist within the law school. A dean also must be vigilant about how she communicates with others, and how others communicate on her behalf. And she must understand that people will communicate differently with her than with others in ...


The Politics Of Professionalism: Reappraising Occupational Licensure And Competition Policy, Sandeep Vaheesan, Frank A. Pasquale Jan 2017

The Politics Of Professionalism: Reappraising Occupational Licensure And Competition Policy, Sandeep Vaheesan, Frank A. Pasquale

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Assessing Law Students As Reflective Practitioners, Jodi Balsam, Susan L. Brooks, Margaret Reuter Jan 2017

Assessing Law Students As Reflective Practitioners, Jodi Balsam, Susan L. Brooks, Margaret Reuter

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Nonsense You Say, Nicholas W. Allard Jan 2017

Nonsense You Say, Nicholas W. Allard

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Tort In Search Of A Remedy: Prying Open The Courthouse Doors For Legal Malpractice Victims, Susan Saab Fortney Jan 2017

A Tort In Search Of A Remedy: Prying Open The Courthouse Doors For Legal Malpractice Victims, Susan Saab Fortney

Faculty Scholarship

Black's Law Dictionary defines “tort” as a civil wrong for which a remedy may be obtained. In examining both the economics and jurisprudence related to legal malpractice, the article discusses why the “remedy” portion of this definition is unavailable for many victims of legal malpractice. This discussion considers the different stages of a legal malpractice case, including the challenges that injured persons face in retaining experienced counsel to represent them, the anatomy of the legal malpractice case, and the difficulties in collecting judgements or settlements. The discussion will consider how “capture” and “judicial bias” contribute to the “disappearing legal ...


Is The Future Of Law A Driverless Car? Assessing How The Data Analytics Revolution Will Transform Legal Practice, Eric L. Talley Jan 2017

Is The Future Of Law A Driverless Car? Assessing How The Data Analytics Revolution Will Transform Legal Practice, Eric L. Talley

Faculty Scholarship

Machine learning and artificial intelligence technologies (“data analytics”) are quickly transforming research and practice in law, raising questions of whether the law can survive as a vibrant profession for natural persons to enter. In this article, I argue that data analytics approaches are overwhelmingly likely to continue to penetrate law, even in domains that have heretofore been dominated by human decision makers. As a vehicle for demonstrating this claim, I describe an extended example of using machine learning to identify and categorize fiduciary duty waiver provisions in publicly disclosed corporate documents. Notwithstanding the power of machine learning techniques, however, I ...


Attorney-Client Confidentiality: A Critical Analysis, William H. Simon Jan 2017

Attorney-Client Confidentiality: A Critical Analysis, William H. Simon

Faculty Scholarship

Attorney-client confidentiality doctrine is distinguished by its expansiveness and its rigid or categorical form. This brief essay argues that the rationales for these features are unpersuasive. It compares the “strong confidentiality” of current doctrine to a hypothetical narrower and more flexible “moderate confidentiality” and concludes that moderate confidentiality is more plausible. It is unlikely that current doctrine yields benefits that justify its costs.


Peter Singer, Drowning Children, And Pro Bono, John M.A. Dipippa Oct 2016

Peter Singer, Drowning Children, And Pro Bono, John M.A. Dipippa

Faculty Scholarship

This Article uses the ethicist Peter Singer's principles to examine and critique the legal profession's pro bono efforts in the face of the persistent gap between the public's legal needs and their ability to meet them. Singer argues that adults should jump into a pond to save a drowning child. Using the drowning child as an analogy, this Article argues that lawyers are morally obligated to (1)increase the amount of their pro bono efforts, (2) be more selective in the cases they take, and (3) be significantly more generous in their financial support for legal services ...


For Judith S. Kaye, Susan Herman Jul 2016

For Judith S. Kaye, Susan Herman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Influence Of Algorithms: The Importance Of Tracking Technology As Legal Educators, Brian Sites Jan 2016

The Influence Of Algorithms: The Importance Of Tracking Technology As Legal Educators, Brian Sites

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Book Review: Automating The Professions: Utopian Pipe Dream Or Dystopian Nightmare?, Frank A. Pasquale Jan 2016

Book Review: Automating The Professions: Utopian Pipe Dream Or Dystopian Nightmare?, Frank A. Pasquale

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Prepared For Practice? Developing A Comprehensive Assessment Plan For A Law School Professional Skills Program, 50 U.S.F. L. Rev. 245 (2016), Anthony Niedwiecki Jan 2016

Prepared For Practice? Developing A Comprehensive Assessment Plan For A Law School Professional Skills Program, 50 U.S.F. L. Rev. 245 (2016), Anthony Niedwiecki

Faculty Scholarship

The new ABA Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools (“ABA Standards”) require law schools to develop and publish learning outcomes that explicitly state what they want their students to be able to do and know upon completion of the law school curriculum. The ABA Standards also require that law schools develop a plan to assess these learning outcomes through course assessment, programmatic assessment,and institutional assessment.In addition to the ABA, regional accreditors of higher education also require that universities and law schools have an extensive learning outcome and assessment plan.These requirements essentially ask schools ...


Bar, Bench, And Civic Culture, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr. Jan 2016

Bar, Bench, And Civic Culture, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Law Schools And Learning Outcomes: Developing A Coherent, Cohesive, And Comprehensive Law School Curriculum, 64 Clev. St. L. Rev. 661 (2016), Anthony Niedwiecki Jan 2016

Law Schools And Learning Outcomes: Developing A Coherent, Cohesive, And Comprehensive Law School Curriculum, 64 Clev. St. L. Rev. 661 (2016), Anthony Niedwiecki

Faculty Scholarship

This Article will detail a process that law schools can use to comply with the ABA Standards requiring schools develop their learning outcomes for the entire institution, academic programs, and courses. At the same time, this process can be used as a roadmap for curricular review and planning. As an example, this Article will use the steps that The John Marshall Law School took to review and change its professional skills curriculum. Part I will outline the accreditation requirements for developing and publishing learning outcomes. Part II of the Article will provide an overview of the process of curricular planning ...


Cases And Case-Lawyers, Richard A. Danner Jan 2016

Cases And Case-Lawyers, Richard A. Danner

Faculty Scholarship

In the nineteenth century, the term “case-lawyer” was used as a label for lawyers who seemed to care more about locating precedents applicable to their current cases than understanding the principles behind the reported case law. Criticisms of case-lawyers appeared in English journals in the late 1820s, then in the United States, usually from those who believed that every lawyer needed to know and understand the unchanging principles of the common law in order to resolve issues not found in the reported cases. After the Civil War, expressions of concern about caselawyers increased with the significant growth in the amount ...


A Call To Cultivate The Public Interest: Beyond Pro Bono, Ann Juergens, Diane Galatowitsch Jan 2016

A Call To Cultivate The Public Interest: Beyond Pro Bono, Ann Juergens, Diane Galatowitsch

Faculty Scholarship

This essay asserts that incorporation of the public's interests in lawyers' daily work is an essential responsibility of the profession. The Preamble to the Model Rules of Professional Conduct frames this lawyers' duty as that of a "public citizen having special responsibility for the quality of justice." Yet the modem legal profession has reduced "public interest" practice to work that is done for no or almost no fee. The transformation of lawyer from public citizen to servant of mostly private interests has taken place over the last thirty-five years, following the legal profession's embrace of pro bono work ...


Lawyers And The Secret Welfare State, Milan Markovic Jan 2016

Lawyers And The Secret Welfare State, Milan Markovic

Faculty Scholarship

This Article suggests that the United States maintains a secret welfare state. The secret welfare state exists because of lawyers’ ubiquitous use of questionable practices in representing clients before benefit-granting government agencies, which enable thousands of individual to collect public benefits who may not qualify for them. This Article focuses in particular on lawyers’ handling of evidence of nondisability in Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) proceedings and participation in Medicaid planning. It may be possible that the legal profession’s central role in the distribution of public benefits is an obstacle to a fairer and more transparent social safety net.