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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Should Corporations Have A Purpose?, Jill E. Fisch, Steven Davidoff Solomon Mar 2020

Should Corporations Have A Purpose?, Jill E. Fisch, Steven Davidoff Solomon

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The hot topic in corporate governance is the debate over corporate purpose and, in particular, whether corporations should shift their purpose from the pursuit of shareholder wealth to pursuing a broader conception of stakeholder or societal value. We argue that this debate has overlooked the critical predicate questions of whether a corporation should have a purpose at all and, if so, why,

We address these questions by examining the historical, legal and theoretical justifications for corporate purpose. We find that none of the three provides a basis for requiring a corporation to articulate a particular purpose or for a given ...


The Traditions Of American Constitutional Law, Marc O. Degirolami Mar 2020

The Traditions Of American Constitutional Law, Marc O. Degirolami

Notre Dame Law Review

This Article identifies a new method of constitutional interpretation: the use of tradition as constitutive of constitutional meaning. It studies what the Supreme Court means by invoking tradition and whether what it means remains constant across the document and over time. Traditionalist interpretation is pervasive, consistent, and recurrent across the Court’s constitutional doctrine. So, too, are criticisms of traditionalist interpretation. There are also more immediate reasons to study the role of tradition in constitutional interpretation. The Court’s two newest members, Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, have indicated that tradition informs their understanding of constitutional meaning. The study ...


Crisis? Whose Crisis?, Jack M. Beermann Mar 2020

Crisis? Whose Crisis?, Jack M. Beermann

William & Mary Law Review

Every moment in human history can be characterized by someone as “socially and politically charged.” For a large portion of the population of the United States, nearly the entire history of the country has been socially and politically charged, first because they were enslaved and then because they were subjected to discriminatory laws and unequal treatment under what became known as “Jim Crow.” The history of the United States has also been a period of social and political upheaval for American Indians, the people who occupied the territory that became the United States before European settlement. Although both African-Americans and ...


Crisis? Whose Crisis?, Jack Beermann Mar 2020

Crisis? Whose Crisis?, Jack Beermann

Faculty Scholarship

Every moment in human history can be characterized by someone as “socially and politically charged.” For a large portion of the population of the United States, nearly the entire history of the country has been socially and politically charged, first because they were enslaved and then because they were subjected to discriminatory laws and unequal treatment under what became known as “Jim Crow.” The history of the United States has also been a period of social and political upheaval for American Indians, the people who occupied the territory that became the United States before European settlement. Although both African-Americans and ...


Law Library Blog (February 2020): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Feb 2020

Law Library Blog (February 2020): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


A Brief History Of Judical Appointments From The Last 50 Years Through The Trump Administration, Donald F. Mcgahn Ii Feb 2020

A Brief History Of Judical Appointments From The Last 50 Years Through The Trump Administration, Donald F. Mcgahn Ii

William & Mary Law Review

Thank you so much for that kind introduction. I really appreciate the opportunity to be here today. I am going to talk about the confirmation process generally. There is no better place to talk about it than here. Let me begin with some numbers and statistics, before I turn to the main thrust of my talk, to give some context as to what recent Presidents have done with respect to judicial appointments. President Trump has appointed two Supreme Court Justices, Neil Gorsuch and Brett of Appeals; twenty-nine so far have been confirmed. The Senate Leader, Senator Mitch McConnell, has already ...


Segregation In The Galleries: A Reconsideration, Richard Primus Feb 2020

Segregation In The Galleries: A Reconsideration, Richard Primus

Michigan Law Review Online

When constitutional lawyers talk about the original meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment as applied to questions of race, they often men-tion that the spectators’ galleries in Congress were racially segregated when Congress debated the Amendment.1 If the Thirty-Ninth Congress practiced racial segregation, the thinking goes, then it probably did not mean to prohibit racial segregation.2 As an argument about constitutional interpretation, this line of thinking has both strengths and weaknesses. But this brief Essay is not about the interpretive consequences, if any, of segregation in the congressional galleries during the 1860s. It is about the factual claim that ...


Right-Remedy Equilibration And The Asymmetric Entrenchment Of Legal Entitlements, Michael Coenen Jan 2020

Right-Remedy Equilibration And The Asymmetric Entrenchment Of Legal Entitlements, Michael Coenen

Boston College Law Review

Public-law litigation often gives rise to a basic but important asymmetry: claimants wishing to obtain a particular form of redress for a particular legal wrong must satisfy all the relevant procedural, substantive, and remedial prerequisites to the issuance of judicial relief. In contrast, governments wishing to avoid the issuance of that remedy need only demonstrate that a single such requirement operates in their favor. This Article considers the extent to which this asymmetry influences the development of the law. Specifically, this Article hypothesizes that, where the remediation of a right depends on a claimant’s satisfaction of multiple, mutually necessary ...


The Captive Lab Rat: Human Medical Experimentation In The Carceral State, Laura I. Appleman Jan 2020

The Captive Lab Rat: Human Medical Experimentation In The Carceral State, Laura I. Appleman

Boston College Law Review

Human medical experimentation upon captive, vulnerable subjects is not a relic of our American past. It is part of our present. The extensive history of medical experimentation on the disabled, the poor, the mentally ill, and the incarcerated has been little explored. Its continuance has been even less discussed, especially in the legal literature. The standard narrative of human medical experimentation ends abruptly in the 1970s, with the uncovering of the Tuskegee syphilis study. My research shows, however, that this narrative is incorrect and incomplete. The practice of experimenting on the captive and vulnerable persists. Our current approach to human ...


Mercy Otis Warren: Republican Scribe And Defender Of Liberties, Mary Kathryn Mueller Jan 2020

Mercy Otis Warren: Republican Scribe And Defender Of Liberties, Mary Kathryn Mueller

Bound Away: The Liberty Journal of History

An active proponent of republican government, Mercy Otis Warren had a significant role in the revolutionary period. She was a woman who was close to the action, well-acquainted with the central figures, and instrumental in bringing about the monumental changes in America in the late 1700s. Referred to as the “muse of the revolution,”[1] Mercy Otis Warren used her pen to significantly broaden the colonial understanding of a republican form of government and passionately promote it. From a collection of early poems and political satires written in the years preceding the war to her epic history of the revolution ...


Western Reconstruction And Woman Suffrage, Lorianne Updike Toler Jan 2020

Western Reconstruction And Woman Suffrage, Lorianne Updike Toler

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

The normal narrative of woman suffrage in the United States begins in Seneca Falls, New York, and steadily marches along through the lives and papers of the most noteworthy national suffragettes—Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and a handful of other women until the hard-fought passage of the Nineteenth Amendment. The six-volume History of Woman Suffrage tomes tells just such a story.

Yet the dominant narrative “overgeneralizes the experiences of the national, largely eastern leadership” and “generally neglect[s] the West, or fail[s] to evaluate its significance within the national movement.” Although the American Woman Suffrage ...


Thomas L. Shaffer: A Remembrance, Noel Augustyn Jan 2020

Thomas L. Shaffer: A Remembrance, Noel Augustyn

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Tribute to Thomas L. Shaffer


A Jewish Perspective On Tom Shaffer: Zecher Tzadik Livracha (May The Memory Of The Righteous Be A Blessing), Russell G. Pearce Jan 2020

A Jewish Perspective On Tom Shaffer: Zecher Tzadik Livracha (May The Memory Of The Righteous Be A Blessing), Russell G. Pearce

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Tribute to Thomas L. Shaffer


Lawyers, Religious Faith, And Virtues: Reflections On Tom And Nancy Shaffer, Robert F. Cochran Jr. Jan 2020

Lawyers, Religious Faith, And Virtues: Reflections On Tom And Nancy Shaffer, Robert F. Cochran Jr.

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Tribute to Tom and Nancy Shaffer


Thomas L. Shaffer, Legal Ethics, And St. Mary’S University, Vincent R. Johnson Jan 2020

Thomas L. Shaffer, Legal Ethics, And St. Mary’S University, Vincent R. Johnson

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Tribute to Thomas L. Shaffer


Reevaluating Politicized Identity & Notions Of An American Political Community In The Legal & Political Process, Marvin L. Astrada Jd, Phd Jan 2020

Reevaluating Politicized Identity & Notions Of An American Political Community In The Legal & Political Process, Marvin L. Astrada Jd, Phd

Indiana Journal of Law and Social Equality

No abstract provided.


Law Library Blog (January 2020): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Jan 2020

Law Library Blog (January 2020): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Do Abolitionism And Constitutionalism Mix?, Aya Gruber Jan 2020

Do Abolitionism And Constitutionalism Mix?, Aya Gruber

Articles

No abstract provided.


Not Yet America's Best Idea: Law, Inequality, And Grand Canyon National Park, Sarah Krakoff Jan 2020

Not Yet America's Best Idea: Law, Inequality, And Grand Canyon National Park, Sarah Krakoff

Articles

Even the nation’s most cherished and protected public lands are not spaces apart from the workings of law, politics, and power. This Essay explores that premise in the context of Grand Canyon National Park. On the occasion of the Park’s 100th Anniversary, it examines how law — embedded in a political economy committed to rapid growth and development in the southwestern United States — facilitated the violent displacement of indigenous peoples and entrenched racialized inequalities in the surrounding region. It also explores law’s shortcomings in the context of sexual harassment and discrimination within the Park. The Essay concludes by ...


Acts Of Meaning, Resource Diagrams, And Essential Learning Behaviors: The Design Evolution Of Lost & Found, Owen Gottlieb, Ian Schreiber Jan 2020

Acts Of Meaning, Resource Diagrams, And Essential Learning Behaviors: The Design Evolution Of Lost & Found, Owen Gottlieb, Ian Schreiber

Articles

Lost & Found is a tabletop-to-mobile game series designed for teaching medieval religious legal systems. The long-term goals of the project are to change the discourse around religious laws, such as foregrounding the prosocial aspects of religious law such as collaboration, cooperation, and communal sustainability. This design case focuses on the evolution of the design of the mechanics and core systems in the first two tabletop games in the series, informed by over three and a half years’ worth of design notes, playable prototypes, outside design consultations, internal design reviews, playtests, and interviews.


Arthur C. Y. Yao (1906-2004): A Pioneer Chinese Professor At St. Mary's University School Of Law, Robert H. Hu Jan 2020

Arthur C. Y. Yao (1906-2004): A Pioneer Chinese Professor At St. Mary's University School Of Law, Robert H. Hu

Faculty Articles

No abstract provided.


Arthur C. Y. Yao (1906–2004): A Pioneer Chinese Professor At St. Mary’S University School Of Law, Robert H. Hu Jan 2020

Arthur C. Y. Yao (1906–2004): A Pioneer Chinese Professor At St. Mary’S University School Of Law, Robert H. Hu

St. Mary's Law Journal

Abstract forthcoming


Judicial Independence: Origins And Contemporary Challenges, David J. Barron Jan 2020

Judicial Independence: Origins And Contemporary Challenges, David J. Barron

Roger Williams University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Race, Rights, And The Representation Of Children, Barry Feld, Perry Moriearty Jan 2020

Race, Rights, And The Representation Of Children, Barry Feld, Perry Moriearty

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


#Livingwhileblack: Blackness As Nuisance, Taja-Nia Y. Henderson, Jamila Jefferson-Jones Jan 2020

#Livingwhileblack: Blackness As Nuisance, Taja-Nia Y. Henderson, Jamila Jefferson-Jones

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Fiduciary Theory Of Prosecution, Bruce A. Green, Rebecca Roiphe Jan 2020

A Fiduciary Theory Of Prosecution, Bruce A. Green, Rebecca Roiphe

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Faculty List Jan 2020

Faculty List

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

No abstract provided.


Another Quest For The Holy Grail Of Law: Ius Generis - Law As A Countermovement To Human Cognition, Norbert Altvater Jan 2020

Another Quest For The Holy Grail Of Law: Ius Generis - Law As A Countermovement To Human Cognition, Norbert Altvater

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

In hopes of providing some possible further insight into the nature of law in all contexts, this Article contributes another layer to the discussion respecting an evolutionary ontology of law. It advances a preliminary sketch of the possible genesis of norms as a countermovement to human cognition, with law, as a type of norms thereby integrally interwoven into humanity itself. With this understanding of its origins, law, whether considered from the positive law, natural law or systems theory perspective, may be understood more clearly and its applications perhaps anticipated. This Article analyzes whether this proposed countermovement theory might provide common ...


The Perfect Opinion, Andrew Jensen Kerr Jan 2020

The Perfect Opinion, Andrew Jensen Kerr

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

In my Article, "The Perfect Opinion," I collate favorite judicial opinions to inductively derive an archetype of perfection. The question of which opinions we like the most is decidedly subjective, but it also reveals implied preferences for creative judging that might not register on citation counts or be prioritized when editing casebooks. Importantly, our choice of a favorite reflects something about us. So why do judges often select non-authoritative opinions (alternative concurrences or dissents) or no- citation opinions (that don’t cite to prior case law) when asked of their favorite opinion? We might predict that most judges would select ...


My Genetic Child May Not Be My Legal Child? A Functionalist Perspective On The Need For Surrogacy Equality In The United States, Rachel I. Gewurz Jan 2020

My Genetic Child May Not Be My Legal Child? A Functionalist Perspective On The Need For Surrogacy Equality In The United States, Rachel I. Gewurz

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

While assisted reproductive technology, and surrogacy in particular, may appear to be a straightforward solution to infertility, the legal field is extremely complex. The patchwork of laws across the United States leaves intended parents at risk for a court to deny legal rights to their biological child. This Note will examine the complexities of surrogacy agreements and the need for a federal, uniform surrogacy law under the sociological functionalist theory of society.