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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Case That Stirred The State Of Georgia, Donald E. Wilkes Jr. Jan 2019

The Case That Stirred The State Of Georgia, Donald E. Wilkes Jr.

Popular Media

In the second half of the 19th Century, hundreds of murders occurred in Georgia, but only two murder cases electrified the entire state. Both cases were the subject of massive amounts of publicity in Georgia newspapers, and for years both cases were ceaselessly talked about in every part of this state.

One of these two notable murder cases was the Woolfolk murder case, involving Tom Woolfolk, nicknamed Bloody Woolfolk, who in 1887 murdered nine members of his family with an axe in Bibb County and after two trials was hanged in 1890. In 1997, I published a book review in ...


John Reed's Advertisement, Pamela G. Smith Jan 2019

John Reed's Advertisement, Pamela G. Smith

Perspectives on Law School History

No abstract provided.


Policing Narrative, Tal Kastner Jan 2019

Policing Narrative, Tal Kastner

SMU Law Review

Counter narrative, a story that calls attention to and rebuts the presumptions of a dominant narrative framework, functions as an essential tool to reshape the bounds of the law. It has the potential to shape the collective notion of what constitutes legal authority. Black Lives Matter offers a counter narrative that challenges the characterization of the shared public space, among other aspects of contemporary society, as the space of law. Using the concept of necropower—the mobilization and prioritization of the state’s power to kill—I analyze the contested physical and conceptual space of law exposed by the counter ...


Richard Posner: A Class Of One, Robert C. Farrell Jan 2019

Richard Posner: A Class Of One, Robert C. Farrell

SMU Law Review

Judge Richard Posner, best known for his contributions to the field of law and economics, has also made an outsized contribution to another area of the law—the equal protection class-of-one claim. By some combination of happenstance and design, Posner was able to shape the class-of-one doctrine even where his views were inconsistent with Supreme Court precedent. The Supreme Court’s initial exposition of the doctrine had identified an equal protection violation when there was intentionally different treatment of similarly situated persons without a rational basis for the difference in treatment. Posner insisted that this language included within it a ...


John Reed: Dickinson Law's Founder, Pamela G. Smith Jan 2019

John Reed: Dickinson Law's Founder, Pamela G. Smith

Perspectives on Law School History

No abstract provided.


Property And Sovereignty: An Indian Reserve And A Canadian City, Douglas C. Harris Jan 2019

Property And Sovereignty: An Indian Reserve And A Canadian City, Douglas C. Harris

Douglas C Harris

Property rights, wrote Morris Cohen in 1927, are delegations of sovereign power. They are created by the state and operate to establish limits on its power. As such, the allocation of property rights is an exercise of sovereignty and a limited delegation of it. Sixty years later, Joseph Singer used Cohen’s conceptual framing in a critical review of developments in American Indian law. Where the US Supreme Court had the opportunity to label an American Indian interest as either a sovereign interest or a property interest, he argued, it invariably chose to the disadvantage of the Indians. Within Canada ...


Second Redemption, Third Reconstruction, Richard A. Primus Jan 2019

Second Redemption, Third Reconstruction, Richard A. Primus

Articles

In The Accumulation of Advantages, the picture that Professor Owen Fiss paints about equality during and since the Second Reconstruction is largely a picture in black and white. That makes some sense. The black/white experience is probably the most important throughline in the story of equal protection. It was the central theme of both the First and Second Reconstructions. In keeping with that orientation, the picture of disadvantage described by Fiss’s theory of cumulative responsibility is largely drawn from the black/white experience. Important as it is, however, the black/white experience does not exhaust the subject of ...


Burton R. Laub: Dickinson Law's Fourth Dean, Pamela G. Smith Jan 2019

Burton R. Laub: Dickinson Law's Fourth Dean, Pamela G. Smith

Perspectives on Law School History

No abstract provided.


Judging Well, Francis J. Mootz Iii Jan 2019

Judging Well, Francis J. Mootz Iii

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Can judges interpret the law in a manner that is objectively verifiable, or do judges necessarily – even if unconsciously – inject their own predispositions and biases into their decisions? It is difficult to decide whether such a question is frivolous in the post-Realist age, or whether it is the is the single most important question that we can ask about our legal system. I endorse both responses. The question, as phrased, is both vitally important and unanswerable on its own terms. Rather than seeking an elusive objective standard by which to measure the correctness of “a judgment,” I argue that we ...


Against Life Without Parole, Judith Lichtenberg Jan 2019

Against Life Without Parole, Judith Lichtenberg

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

We have many good reasons to abolish life without parole sentences (LWOP, known in some countries as whole life sentences) and no good reasons not to. After reviewing the current state of LWOP sentences in the United States, I argue that the only rationale for punishment that can hope to justify them is retributivism. But even if retributivism is a sound principle, it in no way entails life without parole. One reason is that unless one believes, like Kant, that appropriate punishments must be carried out whatever the circumstances, we must acknowledge that other considerations are relevant to determining punishments ...


Reconciling The Rule Of Law: Rights And Punishment, Benjamin L. Apt Jan 2019

Reconciling The Rule Of Law: Rights And Punishment, Benjamin L. Apt

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

There is an intractable paradox in the relation between rights and criminal punishment. Criminal punishment frequently conflicts with rights; people typically have identical rights within a legal system, yet the punished are unable to exercise the rights to the same extent as other people. But criminal punishment, in conjunction with criminal laws, also operates to protect rights. To clarify the tension between rights and punishment, I start by analyzing the content and purpose of rights. Next I discuss the nature of rules and the particular types of rules that make up a typical “systems of rules.” I then argue that ...


A Clash Of Principles: Personal Jurisdiction And Two-Level Utilitarianism In The Information Age, Wesley M. Bernhardt Jan 2019

A Clash Of Principles: Personal Jurisdiction And Two-Level Utilitarianism In The Information Age, Wesley M. Bernhardt

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Utilitarianism provides the best analytic framework for “minimum contacts” analyses in multi-state mass tort litigation. Utilitarianism is a consequentialist ethical philosophy contending that one should act in a way that maximizes utility; that is, act in a way that maximizes pleasure and minimizes pain. This is often referred to as the “felicific calculus.”1 To maintain a civil lawsuit against a defendant, a court must have “personal jurisdiction” over that defendant, meaning that the defendant must have minimum contacts related to the suit such that maintenance of the suit does not offend traditional notions of fair play and substantial justice ...


Political Speech In The Armed Forces: Shouting Fire In A Crowded Cyberspace, Elliott Hughes Jan 2019

Political Speech In The Armed Forces: Shouting Fire In A Crowded Cyberspace, Elliott Hughes

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

A staple of the American version of democracy is civilian control of the military: we are uncomfortable with politicization of the Armed Forces, and military and other federal laws restrict the political expression of servicemembers (“SMs”) in the Armed Forces, whether they are active- duty members or National Guard or Reserves serving on active duty. These restrictions, while well-intentioned to prevent actual or apparent political partisanship or bias within the military, have the undesired effect of deterring SMs from otherwise healthy political expression. With the advent of the internet and proliferation of social media use, questions regarding SM status and ...


Ethnic Studies As Antisubordination Education: A Critical Race Theory Approach To Employment Discrimination Remedies, Theanne Liu Jan 2019

Ethnic Studies As Antisubordination Education: A Critical Race Theory Approach To Employment Discrimination Remedies, Theanne Liu

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

This Note will use a critical race theory lens to argue that most trainings on equal employment opportunity (“EEO”), diversity, or implicit bias operate as a restrictive remedy to Title VII race discrimination violations, and that incorporating an ethnic studies framework into these trainings can further an expansive view of antidiscrimination law. A restrictive view of antidiscrimination law treats discrimination as an individual instead of structural or societal wrong and looks to addressing future acts of discrimination instead of redressing past and present injustices. An expansive view of antidiscrimination law sees its objective as eradicating conditions of racial subordination. Ethnic ...


Global Judicial Transparency Norms: A Peek Behind The Robes In A Whole New World — A Look At Global “Democratizing” Trends In Judicial Opinion-Issuing Practices, J. Lyn Entrikin Jan 2019

Global Judicial Transparency Norms: A Peek Behind The Robes In A Whole New World — A Look At Global “Democratizing” Trends In Judicial Opinion-Issuing Practices, J. Lyn Entrikin

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

Global developments over the last two decades have debunked the traditional understanding that separate opinions are idiosyncratic of courts in nations following the common law tradition. History reflects that judicial opinion-issuing practices have evolved around the world, adapting to the increasing globalization of legal systems. And recent research confirms that most international and supranational tribunals, even those headquartered in continental Europe, expressly permit individual judges to issue separate opinions, although in some courts various internal norms and customs operate to discourage the practice. In addition, the majority of European national constitutional courts now permit individual judges to publish separate opinions ...


Neuroscience, Justice, And The "Mental Causation" Fallacy, John A. Humbach Jan 2019

Neuroscience, Justice, And The "Mental Causation" Fallacy, John A. Humbach

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Mental causation is a foundational assumption of modern criminal

justice. The law takes it for granted that wrongdoers “deserve”

punishment because their acts are caused by intentions, reasons and other

mental states. A growing body of neuroscience evidence shows, however,

that human behavior is produced by observable physiological activity in

the brain and central nervous system—all in accordance with ordinary

physical laws. Beyond these ordinary physiological interactions and

processes, no hypothesis of mental causation is required to causally

explain behavior.

Despite the evidence, neuroskeptics insist that intentions, reasons and

other mental states can play a causal role in producing ...


Polarization At The Supreme Court? Substantive Due Process Through The Prism Of Legal Theory, Miriam Galston Jan 2019

Polarization At The Supreme Court? Substantive Due Process Through The Prism Of Legal Theory, Miriam Galston

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Much has been written about Obergefell v. Hodges, holding that

same-sex marriage is protected by the Fourteenth Amendment. Virtually

all commentators view the decision as an example of an increasingly

polarized Supreme Court.

This article challenges that characterization by analyzing Kennedy’s

majority opinion and Roberts’ dissent in Obergefell in light of the legal

theories of H. L. A. Hart and Lon Fuller. The article argues that, from a

legal theory perspective, Kennedy and Roberts exhibit numerous, often

surprising commonalities. In addition, Kennedy’s arguments seem to

accurately reflect the methodology he explicitly endorses. Roberts, in

contrast, seems to exaggerate ...


Privacy And The Internet Of Things: Why Changing Expectations Demand Heightened Standards, Graham Johnson Jan 2019

Privacy And The Internet Of Things: Why Changing Expectations Demand Heightened Standards, Graham Johnson

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Entertainment consoles, wearable monitors, and security systems. For

better or worse, internet-connected devices are revolutionizing the

consumer products industry. Referred to broadly as the Internet of Things

(IoT), this ‘smart’ technology is drastically increasing the means, scope,

and frequency by which individuals communicate their personal

information. This Note explores the disruptive impact of IoT consumer

devices on the U.S.’s patchwork system of privacy protections. After

presenting a high-level survey of several key regulatory issues, this Note

argues that the proliferation of IoT devices exposes a fundamental flaw in

the Katz “reasonable expectation of privacy” standard. As individual

expectations ...


Examining The Legality Of Employee Microchipping Under The Lens Of The Transhumanistic Proactionary Principle, Joshua Z. Wasbin Jan 2019

Examining The Legality Of Employee Microchipping Under The Lens Of The Transhumanistic Proactionary Principle, Joshua Z. Wasbin

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Modern workplaces are beginning to look to implanting their

employees with RFID microchips as a replacement for badges and

keycards. While both employers and employees stand to benefit from the

convenience of this innovation, states have begun to look to legislative

options for restricting employers from requiring that their employees get

microchipped. This Note will examine some of the state legislation and

will argue that Congress must institute a federal law that will provide

similar, if not stronger, levels of protection for employees who seek to

avoid being microchipped, an argument premised upon the

Transhumanistic Proactionary Principle.


Reconsidering Judicial Independence: Forty-Five Years In The Trenches And In The Tower, Stephen B. Burbank Jan 2019

Reconsidering Judicial Independence: Forty-Five Years In The Trenches And In The Tower, Stephen B. Burbank

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Trusting in the integrity of our institutions when they are not under stress, we focus attention on them both when they are under stress or when we need them to protect us against other institutions. In the case of the federal judiciary, the two conditions often coincide. In this essay, I use personal experience to provide practical context for some of the important lessons about judicial independence to be learned from the periods of stress for the federal judiciary I have observed as a lawyer and concerned citizen, and to provide theoretical context for lessons I have deemed significant as ...


A Tale Of Sovereignty And Liberalism: The Lockean Myth Of Intellectual Property, Shaoul Sussman Jan 2019

A Tale Of Sovereignty And Liberalism: The Lockean Myth Of Intellectual Property, Shaoul Sussman

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

The influence of John Locke’s thought upon the general legal perception of property rights cannot be overstated. Locke’s Labor theory of property holds that property originally comes about through individual exertion upon natural objects and that legal rights in the result of this labor are in fact property rights. The Lockean theory of property has dominated the Anglo-American legal discourse and is frequently used to justify various property regulation schemes. Despite this fact, many scholars have struggled to apply the theory to the field of intellectual property, and in particular to the field of patents and copyright. Many ...


Licensing Paralegals To Practice Law: A Path Toward Bridging The Justice Gap In Minnesota, Conner Suddick Jan 2019

Licensing Paralegals To Practice Law: A Path Toward Bridging The Justice Gap In Minnesota, Conner Suddick

Departmental Honors Projects

There are few legal avenues for low-income and other marginalized groups in the United States to seek civil justice. A lack of legal assistance in civil issues can be detrimental to a person’s health and wellbeing. Given this reality, the legal profession must broaden its capacity to serve these needs, and one path is to embrace the aid of paralegals. In 2016, the legal community of Minnesota had conversations about whether the state should provide limited licenses to paralegals. To study models from across the country, the Minnesota State Bar Association (MSBA) formed the Alternative Legal Models Task Force ...


Negotiating The Lender Of Last Resort: The 1913 Federal Reserve Act As A Debate Over Credit Distribution, Nadav Orian Peer Jan 2019

Negotiating The Lender Of Last Resort: The 1913 Federal Reserve Act As A Debate Over Credit Distribution, Nadav Orian Peer

Articles

“Lending of last resort” is one of the key powers of central banks. As a lender of last resort, the Federal Reserve (the “Fed”) famously supports commercial banks facing distressed liquidity conditions, thereby mitigating destabilizing bank runs. Less famously, lender-of-last-resort powers also influence the distribution of credit among different groups in society and therefore have high stakes for economic inequality. The Fed’s role as a lender of last resort witnessed an unprecedented expansion during the 2007–2009 Crisis when the Fed invoked emergency powers to lend to a new set of borrowers known as “shadow banks”. The decision proved ...


Whose Market Is It Anyway? A Philosophy And Law Critique Of The Supreme Court’S Free-Speech Absolutism, Spencer Bradley Jan 2019

Whose Market Is It Anyway? A Philosophy And Law Critique Of The Supreme Court’S Free-Speech Absolutism, Spencer Bradley

Dickinson Law Review

In the wake of Charlottesville, the rise of the alt-right, and campus controversies, the First Amendment has fallen into public scrutiny. Historically, the First Amendment’s “marketplace of ideas” has been a driving source of American political identity; since Brandenburg v. Ohio, the First Amendment protects all speech from government interference unless it causes incitement. The marketplace of ideas allows for the good and the bad ideas to enter American society and ultimately allows the people to decide their own course.

Yet, is the First Amendment truly a tool of social progress? Initially, the First Amendment curtailed war-time dissidents and ...


Where The Constitution Falls Short: Confession Admissibility And Police Regulation, Courtney E. Lewis Jan 2019

Where The Constitution Falls Short: Confession Admissibility And Police Regulation, Courtney E. Lewis

Dickinson Law Review

A confession presented at trial is one of the most damning pieces of evidence against a criminal defendant, which means that the rules governing its admissibility are critical. At the outset of confession admissibility in the United States, the judiciary focused on a confession’s truthfulness. Culminating in the landmark case Miranda v. Arizona, judicial concern with the reliability of confessions shifted away from whether a confession was true and towards curtailing unconstitutional police misconduct. Post-hoc constitutionality review, however, is arguably inappropriate. Such review is inappropriate largely because the reviewing court must find that the confession was voluntary only by ...


The Depravity Of The 1930s And The Modern Administrative State, Steven G. Calabresi, Gary Lawson Jan 2019

The Depravity Of The 1930s And The Modern Administrative State, Steven G. Calabresi, Gary Lawson

Notre Dame Law Review

Gillian Metzger’s 2017 Harvard Law Review foreword, entitled 1930s Redux: The Administrative State Under Siege, is a paean to the modern administrative state, with its massive subdelegations of legislative and judicial power to so-called “expert” bureaucrats, who are layered well out of reach of electoral accountability yet do not have the constitutional status of Article III judges. We disagree with this celebration of technocratic government on just about every level, but this Article focuses on two relatively narrow points.

First, responding more to implicit assumptions that pervade modern discourse than specifically to Professor Metzger’s analysis, we challenge the ...


The Recent Unpleasantness: Understanding The Cycles Of Constitutional Time, Jack M. Balkin Jan 2019

The Recent Unpleasantness: Understanding The Cycles Of Constitutional Time, Jack M. Balkin

Indiana Law Journal

In this Article, I will talk about what I expect is going to happen in the next five to ten years. Unlike eclipses, however, one can’t be entirely sure of the future. Politics is not astronomy, and human affairs do not operate like clockwork. Moreover, we can’t assume that everything is already foreordained: that if people simply sit on their hands and do nothing, the cycles I describe in this lecture will take care of themselves. Quite the contrary. I am telling a story about what happens in the long run, but it is not a deterministic story ...


Argument And The "Moral Impact" Theory Of The Law, Alani Golanski Jan 2019

Argument And The "Moral Impact" Theory Of The Law, Alani Golanski

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

The innovative Moral Impact Theory (“MIT”) of law claims that the

moral impacts of legal institutional actions, rather than the linguistic

content of “rules” or judicial or legislative pronouncements, determine

law’s content. MIT’s corollary is that legal interpretation consists in the

inquiry into what is morally required as a consequence of the lawmaking

actions.

This paper challenges MIT by critiquing its attendant view of the

nature of legal interpretation and argument. Points include the following:

(1) it is not practicable to predicate law’s content on the ability of legal

officials to resolve moral controversies; (2) it would ...


Covering And Identity Performance In Employment Discrimination Law, Megan Von Borstel Jan 2019

Covering And Identity Performance In Employment Discrimination Law, Megan Von Borstel

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

At a time when the law is transforming gay rights, the LGBTQ

community finds itself at the climax of its latest civil rights challenge:

federal employment non-discrimination protections. This Note addresses

the federal circuit split regarding whether Title VII’s prohibition against

sex discrimination includes a prohibition on the basis of sexual

orientation. By integrating the Seventh Circuit’s analysis in Hively v. Ivy

Tech Community College within the frameworks of intersectionality,

identity performance, and queer theory, this Note evaluates how an

evolving understanding of Title VII’s protections affect members of the

LGBTQ communities.


Why Robert Mueller’S Appointment As Special Counsel Was Unlawful, Gary Lawson, Steven Calabresi Jan 2019

Why Robert Mueller’S Appointment As Special Counsel Was Unlawful, Gary Lawson, Steven Calabresi

Faculty Scholarship

Since 1999, when the independent counsel provisions of the Ethics in Government Act expired, the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) has had in place regulations providing for the appointment of Special Counsels who possess “the full power and independent authority to exercise all investigative and prosecutorial functions of any United States Attorney.” Appointments under these regulations, such as the May 17,2017 appointment of Robert S. Mueller to investigate the Trump campaign, are patently unlawful, for three distinct reasons.

First, all federal offices must be “established by Law,” and there is no statute authorizing such an office in the DOJ. We ...