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Articles 1 - 24 of 24

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Establishment Of Religion Supreme Court Appellate Division Third Department Jul 2019

Establishment Of Religion Supreme Court Appellate Division Third Department

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Double Jeopardy Jul 2019

Double Jeopardy

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Double Jeopardy Supreme Court Appellate Division Second Department Jul 2019

Double Jeopardy Supreme Court Appellate Division Second Department

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Double Jeopardy Jul 2019

Double Jeopardy

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Covering And Identity Performance In Employment Discrimination Law, Megan Von Borstel Jan 2019

Covering And Identity Performance In Employment Discrimination Law, Megan Von Borstel

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

At a time when the law is transforming gay rights, the LGBTQ

community finds itself at the climax of its latest civil rights challenge:

federal employment non-discrimination protections. This Note addresses

the federal circuit split regarding whether Title VII’s prohibition against

sex discrimination includes a prohibition on the basis of sexual

orientation. By integrating the Seventh Circuit’s analysis in Hively v. Ivy

Tech Community College within the frameworks of intersectionality,

identity performance, and queer theory, this Note evaluates how an

evolving understanding of Title VII’s protections affect members of the

LGBTQ communities.


Mccleskey V. Kemp: Field Notes From 1977-1991, John Charles Boger Jun 2018

Mccleskey V. Kemp: Field Notes From 1977-1991, John Charles Boger

Northwestern University Law Review

The litigation campaign that led to McCleskey v. Kemp did not begin as an anti-death-penalty effort. It grew in soil long washed in the blood of African-Americans, lynched or executed following rude semblances of trials and hasty appeals, which had prompted the NAACP from its very founding to demand “simple justice” in individual criminal cases. When the Warren Court signaled, in the early 1960s, that it might be open to reflection on broader patterns of racial discrimination in capital sentencing, the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF) began to gather empirical evidence and craft appropriate constitutional responses. As that effort built, other deficiencies in state capital states became apparent, and LDF eventually asserted a broader constitutional critique of state capital structures and processes. By 1967, LDF and its allies had developed a nationwide “moratorium” campaign that challenged death sentencing statutes in virtually every state.

Though the campaign appeared poised for partial success in 1969, changes in Court personnel and shifts in the nation’s mood dashed LDF’s initial hopes. Yet unexpectedly, in 1972, five Justices ruled in Furman v. Georgia that all death sentences and all capital statutes nationwide would fall under the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishments. Each of the nine Furman Justices wrote separately, without a single governing rationale beyond their expressed uneasiness that the death penalty was being imposed infrequently, capriciously, and in an arbitrary manner. Thirty-five states promptly enacted new and revised capital statutes. Four years later, a majority of the Court held that three of those new state statutes met Eighth and Fourteenth Amendment standards. The 1976 Court majority expressed confidence that the states’ newly revised procedures should work to curb the arbitrariness and capriciousness that had earlier troubled the Furman majority.

The McCleskey case emerged from subsequent review of post-Furman sentencing patterns in the State of Georgia. A brilliant and exhaustive study by Professor David Baldus and his colleagues demonstrated that the Court’s assumptions in 1976 were wrong; strong racial disparities in capital sentencing continued to persist statewide in Georgia—especially in cases in ...


After Shelby County V. Holder, Can Independent Commissions Take The Place Of Section 5 Of The Voting Rights Act?, Brittany C. Armour Jan 2017

After Shelby County V. Holder, Can Independent Commissions Take The Place Of Section 5 Of The Voting Rights Act?, Brittany C. Armour

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Note traces the consequences of the Supreme Court’s decision in Shelby County v. Holder, which held unconstitutional the preclearance formula of the Voting Rights Act that required some states and counties to obtain federal authorization before changing voting procedures. Armour traces the history of the Voting Rights Act and the role independent commissions can play in ensuring that such facially neutral procedures do not have a disparate impact on minority communities. Armour advocates for independent commissions to take the place left empty by the Supreme Court’s rejection of the old preclearance formula suggesting that these commissions are ...


Police Misconduct - A Plaintiff's Point Of View, Part Ii, John Williams Apr 2016

Police Misconduct - A Plaintiff's Point Of View, Part Ii, John Williams

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Police Misconduct - A Plaintiff's Point Of View, Fred Brewington Apr 2016

Police Misconduct - A Plaintiff's Point Of View, Fred Brewington

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Criminal Prosecution And Section 1983, Barry C. Scheck Apr 2016

Criminal Prosecution And Section 1983, Barry C. Scheck

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Marching Across The Putative Black/White Race Line: A Convergence Of Narratology, History, And Theory, Carol L. Zeiner May 2013

Marching Across The Putative Black/White Race Line: A Convergence Of Narratology, History, And Theory, Carol L. Zeiner

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

This Article introduces a category of women who, until now, have been omitted from the scholarly literature on the civil rights movement: northern white women who lived in the South and became active in the civil rights movement, while intending to continue to live in the South on a permanent basis following their activism. Prior to their activism, these women may have been viewed with suspicion because they were “newcomers” and “outsiders.” Their activism earned them the pejorative label “civil rights supporter.” This Article presents the stories of two such women. It examines their stories from the perspective of the ...


Social Justice And The Warren Court: A Preliminary Examination, Arthur S. Miller Feb 2013

Social Justice And The Warren Court: A Preliminary Examination, Arthur S. Miller

Pepperdine Law Review

Whether courts should attempt to advance social justice is a much debated topic in American jurisprudence. The conventional wisdom about the judicial process is to the contrary. In this article, Professor Arthur S. Miller suggests that the Supreme Court's innovative civil rights and civil liberties decisions during Chief Justice Earl Warren's tenure had the ultimate effect of helping to preserve the status quo of the social order. Its decisions, coming at a time of economic abundance, were a means of siphoning off discontent from disadvantaged groups at minimum social cost to the established order. The "activist" decisions under ...


Tortured History: Finding Our Way Back To The Lost Origins Of The Eighth Amendment, Celia Rumann Apr 2012

Tortured History: Finding Our Way Back To The Lost Origins Of The Eighth Amendment, Celia Rumann

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Engendering The History Of Race And International Relations: The Career Of Edith Sampson, 1927–1978, Gwen Jordan Apr 2012

Engendering The History Of Race And International Relations: The Career Of Edith Sampson, 1927–1978, Gwen Jordan

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Edith Sampson was one of the leading black women lawyers in Chicago for over fifty years. She was admitted to the bar in 1927 and achieved a number of firsts in her career: the first black woman judge in Illinois, the first African American delegate to the United Nations, and the first African American appointed to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Sampson was also a pro-democracy, international spokesperson for the U.S. government during the Cold War, a position that earned her scorn from more radical African Americans, contributed to a misinterpretation of her activism, and resulted in her relative ...


Social Justice And The Law, Elaine R. Jones Sep 2007

Social Justice And The Law, Elaine R. Jones

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Tribute To Judge Merhige, Orran L. Brown Nov 2005

Tribute To Judge Merhige, Orran L. Brown

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Reflections On Brown And The Future, Oliver W. Hill Sr. Nov 2004

Reflections On Brown And The Future, Oliver W. Hill Sr.

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


More Than Segregation, Racial Identity: The Neglected Question In Plessy V. Ferguson, Thomas J. Davis Apr 2004

More Than Segregation, Racial Identity: The Neglected Question In Plessy V. Ferguson, Thomas J. Davis

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Transcript: Responses To The Debate On Whether Congress Must End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia , American University Law Review Mar 1999

Transcript: Responses To The Debate On Whether Congress Must End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia , American University Law Review

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Transcript: Must Congress End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia? A Constitutional Debate , American University Law Review Feb 1999

Transcript: Must Congress End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia? A Constitutional Debate , American University Law Review

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Civil Liberty And The Civil War: The Indianapolis Treason Trials, William Rehnquist Oct 1997

Civil Liberty And The Civil War: The Indianapolis Treason Trials, William Rehnquist

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Rights And Politics, Joseph Raz Jan 1995

Rights And Politics, Joseph Raz

Indiana Law Journal

Presented on October 7, 1994, at the Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington, as the inaugural Jerome Hall Lecture.


Quotas, Politics, And Judicial Statesmanship: The Civil Rights Act Of 1991 And Powell's Bakke, Mark H. Grunewald Jan 1992

Quotas, Politics, And Judicial Statesmanship: The Civil Rights Act Of 1991 And Powell's Bakke, Mark H. Grunewald

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Civil Rights In Southern Africa: The Prospect For The Future, Sydney Kentridge Jan 1987

Civil Rights In Southern Africa: The Prospect For The Future, Sydney Kentridge

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.