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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Covering And Identity Performance In Employment Discrimination Law, Megan Von Borstel Jan 2019

Covering And Identity Performance In Employment Discrimination Law, Megan Von Borstel

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

At a time when the law is transforming gay rights, the LGBTQ

community finds itself at the climax of its latest civil rights challenge:

federal employment non-discrimination protections. This Note addresses

the federal circuit split regarding whether Title VII’s prohibition against

sex discrimination includes a prohibition on the basis of sexual

orientation. By integrating the Seventh Circuit’s analysis in Hively v. Ivy

Tech Community College within the frameworks of intersectionality,

identity performance, and queer theory, this Note evaluates how an

evolving understanding of Title VII’s protections affect members of the

LGBTQ communities.


Police Misconduct - A Plaintiff's Point Of View, Part Ii, John Williams Apr 2016

Police Misconduct - A Plaintiff's Point Of View, Part Ii, John Williams

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Police Misconduct - A Plaintiff's Point Of View, Fred Brewington Apr 2016

Police Misconduct - A Plaintiff's Point Of View, Fred Brewington

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Criminal Prosecution And Section 1983, Barry C. Scheck Apr 2016

Criminal Prosecution And Section 1983, Barry C. Scheck

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Introduction To The Workplace Constitution From The New Deal To The New Right, Sophia Z. Lee Jan 2014

Introduction To The Workplace Constitution From The New Deal To The New Right, Sophia Z. Lee

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Today, most American workers do not have constitutional rights on the job. As The Workplace Constitution shows, this outcome was far from inevitable. Instead, American workers have a long history of fighting for such rights. Beginning in the 1930s, civil rights advocates sought constitutional protections against racial discrimination by employers and unions. At the same time, a conservative right-to-work movement argued that the Constitution protected workers from having to join or support unions. Those two movements, with their shared aim of extending constitutional protections to American workers, were a potentially powerful combination. But they sought to use those protections to ...


Social Justice And The Warren Court: A Preliminary Examination, Arthur S. Miller Feb 2013

Social Justice And The Warren Court: A Preliminary Examination, Arthur S. Miller

Pepperdine Law Review

Whether courts should attempt to advance social justice is a much debated topic in American jurisprudence. The conventional wisdom about the judicial process is to the contrary. In this article, Professor Arthur S. Miller suggests that the Supreme Court's innovative civil rights and civil liberties decisions during Chief Justice Earl Warren's tenure had the ultimate effect of helping to preserve the status quo of the social order. Its decisions, coming at a time of economic abundance, were a means of siphoning off discontent from disadvantaged groups at minimum social cost to the established order. The "activist" decisions under ...


Pearson, Iqbal, And Procedural Judicial Activism, Goutam U. Jois Jan 2010

Pearson, Iqbal, And Procedural Judicial Activism, Goutam U. Jois

Goutam U Jois

In its most recent term, the Supreme Court decided Pearson v. Callahan and Ashcroft v. Iqbal, two cases that, even at this early date, can safely be called “game-changers.” What is fairly well known is that Iqbal and Pearson, on their own terms, will hurt civil rights plaintiffs. A point that has not been explored is how the interaction between Iqbal and Pearson will also hurt civil rights plaintiffs. First, the cases threaten to catch plaintiffs on the horns of a dilemma: Iqbal says, in effect, that greater detail is required to get allegations past the motion to dismiss stage ...


Clear As Mud: How The Uncertain Precedential Status Of Unpublished Opinions Muddles Qualified Immunity Determinations, David R. Cleveland Jan 2010

Clear As Mud: How The Uncertain Precedential Status Of Unpublished Opinions Muddles Qualified Immunity Determinations, David R. Cleveland

Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Multiple Ironies: Brown At 50, Ronald S. Sullivan Jr. Jan 2003

Multiple Ironies: Brown At 50, Ronald S. Sullivan Jr.

Faculty Scholarship Series

Brown v. Board of Education occupies a vaunted space in American
jurisprudence. One commentator writes that Brown is the most
celebrated case in the Court's history. Equally laudatory, another
commentator remarks: "In the half century since the Supreme Court's
decision, Brown has become a beloved legal and political icon." A
third proclaims that, "Brown forever changed the role of the United States Supreme Court in American politics and society." To the lay
public, Brown sits among a small pantheon of cases that is widely recognizable
to the average American.' Miranda and Roe v. Wade
likely are the only ...


Transcript: Responses To The Debate On Whether Congress Must End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia , American University Law Review Mar 1999

Transcript: Responses To The Debate On Whether Congress Must End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia , American University Law Review

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Transcript: Must Congress End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia? A Constitutional Debate , American University Law Review Feb 1999

Transcript: Must Congress End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia? A Constitutional Debate , American University Law Review

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.