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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Hustle And Flow: A Social Network Analysis Of The American Federal Judiciary, Daniel Martin Katz Sep 2015

Hustle And Flow: A Social Network Analysis Of The American Federal Judiciary, Daniel Martin Katz

Daniel M Katz

No abstract provided.


Taming A Dragon: Legislative History In Legal Analysis, Mark Deforrest Aug 2013

Taming A Dragon: Legislative History In Legal Analysis, Mark Deforrest

Mark DeForrest

ARTICLE ABSTRACT

TAMING A DRAGON:

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY IN LEGAL ANALYSIS

Mark DeForrest

The use of legislative history in statutory interpretation and analysis has been an area of intensive inquiry since the 1980’s. The debate has been vigorous and has led to the development of sophisticated arguments by both the advocates of the use of legislative history and textualists critical of its use. While the debate has been ongoing, changes in technology have made it easier than ever to access detailed legislative history for both state and federal statutes. This article discusses the impact of both the debate and the ...


Ethics In Legal Education: An Augmentation Of Legal Realism, Gerald R. Ferrera Nov 2012

Ethics In Legal Education: An Augmentation Of Legal Realism, Gerald R. Ferrera

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Hustle And Flow: A Social Network Analysis Of The American Federal Judiciary, Daniel Martin Katz Jan 2010

Hustle And Flow: A Social Network Analysis Of The American Federal Judiciary, Daniel Martin Katz

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Review Of Understanding Labor And Employment Law In China, By Ronald C.Brown, Nicholas C. Howson Jan 2010

Review Of Understanding Labor And Employment Law In China, By Ronald C.Brown, Nicholas C. Howson

Reviews

Any attempt to analyze China’s comprehensive labor reform over the past three decades faces at least two dilemmas. First, the analyst must confront the task of describing how the Chinese state has dismantled the “work unit” (or danwei)- based “iron rice bowl” employment and entitlements system, replacing that comforting but low-production employment and social security scheme with formally-proclaimed legal rights and institutions apparently designed to protect employees in a functioning labor market. Second, the analyst must track how the state’s commitment (at all levels of government) to implementation of proclaimed legal and institutional protections has waxed and waned ...


The Federalism Pendulum, Ronald J. Bacigal Apr 1996

The Federalism Pendulum, Ronald J. Bacigal

Law Faculty Publications

Following Franklin's example, this essay takes a protracted view of the federalization of criminal procedure. It is important to review how the federalism pendulum has swung over the years to reflect concepts of what the Constitution was meant to mean, what it has come to mean, and what it ought to mean.


The Jury As A Source Of Reasonable Search And Seizure Law, Ronald J. Bacigal Jan 1980

The Jury As A Source Of Reasonable Search And Seizure Law, Ronald J. Bacigal

Law Faculty Publications

The definition of a reasonable search has bedeviled the United States Supreme Court for some ninety years. Formal logic or legal reasoning assists the Court in tracing premise to conclusion, but does not alone suggest the initial premise. The Court's difficulty in fourth amendment cases, in general, lies in identifying the premise-the fundamental value which is embodied in this constitutional guarantee. The Court has recognized that this fundamental value, whatever it is, has an origin outside the language of the amendment, and the Court has considered sources such as history, popular consensus, natural law, and utilitarian balancing to find ...


Justiciability, Edwin Borchard Jan 1936

Justiciability, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

It might be supposed that justiciability, the very foundation of the judicial function, would be a matter on which courts could hardly differ. Yet there seems to be the greatest confusion among the courts as to when an issue is and is not susceptible of judicial decision. This is largely due to a devotion to phrases and symbols which make historical investigation and theoretical analysis seem an unnecessary encroachment on the judicial prerogative. The very system of stare decisis invites courts to relieve themselves of the necessity of thinking through again ostensible propositions which seem to have once received the ...