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Legal History Commons

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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Washington University School Of Law’S Global Trajectory, Leila Nadya Sadat Jan 2017

Washington University School Of Law’S Global Trajectory, Leila Nadya Sadat

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay discusses the changing nature of legal education, focusing on the movement from national to global law schools, specifically within the context of globalization. Sadat details the development of international and comparative legal education at Washington University and reflects on their benefit to the School’s reputation. Sadat closes with a discussion of “Global Trumpism,” its potential impact on the Pax Americana, and the resulting effect on Washington University’s international and comparative legal education programs.


Universal Clinic Legal Education: Necessary And Feasible, Robert R. Kuehn Jan 2017

Universal Clinic Legal Education: Necessary And Feasible, Robert R. Kuehn

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay analyzes the data surrounding clinical education in law schools. Kuehn compares the legal education experience to other professional schools, noting that the legal field does not take the steps to prepare law students for the professional field that other schools do. Kuehn argues that a mandated clinical experience for all students is both not costly to obtain and feasible to immediately implement. Kuehn concludes his argument by calling for required clinical training in ABA-approved law schools to ensure practice-ready professionals.


Beyond Stamp Collecting: Ronald Coase And “Scientific” Legal Scholarship, John N. Drobak Jan 2017

Beyond Stamp Collecting: Ronald Coase And “Scientific” Legal Scholarship, John N. Drobak

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay argues that legal scholarship is properly considered a highly technical field of study rather than a system based on classifications. Drobak concedes that excellent legal scholarship requires a complex system of classifications akin to “stamp collecting.” Drobak then makes a case for legal research as a technical science requiring an interdisciplinary approach to confront new issues and further develop current legal doctrines.


Celebrating Masters & Johnson’S Human Sexual Response: A Washington University Legacy In Limbo, Susan Ekberg Stiritz, Susan Frelich Appleton Jan 2017

Celebrating Masters & Johnson’S Human Sexual Response: A Washington University Legacy In Limbo, Susan Ekberg Stiritz, Susan Frelich Appleton

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay discusses how institutions devise traditions and celebrations within the context of protecting established hierarchies of power and privilege. Appleton and Stiritz bring to light the research of William Masters and Virginia Johnson and their publication of Human Sexual Response. The authors argue that Masters and Johnson’s work should be institutionally recognized and celebrated by Washington University. The Essay discusses how Washington University’s neglect has impacted Masters and Johnson’s narrative and reflects upon how their legacy was instead highlighted in the popular Showtime series Masters of Sex. Finally, the Essay reflects upon what might have been ...


Embracing New (And Old) Ideas, James E. Daily Jan 2017

Embracing New (And Old) Ideas, James E. Daily

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay, by James E. Daily, lecturer at Washington University School of Law, identifies current declines in the demand for legal education and the greater job market offers a possible solution—re-introducing the LL.B degree. Daily looks at the historical increases in demand that led to the acceptance of the J.D. as the standard law degree required for practice. Daily proposes law schools should re-organize the current J.D. program to become a research or theory-focused advanced degree, and re-introduce the LL.B undergraduate LL.B degree that integrates the use and creation of new technologies in legal ...


After Shelby County V. Holder, Can Independent Commissions Take The Place Of Section 5 Of The Voting Rights Act?, Brittany C. Armour Jan 2017

After Shelby County V. Holder, Can Independent Commissions Take The Place Of Section 5 Of The Voting Rights Act?, Brittany C. Armour

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Note traces the consequences of the Supreme Court’s decision in Shelby County v. Holder, which held unconstitutional the preclearance formula of the Voting Rights Act that required some states and counties to obtain federal authorization before changing voting procedures. Armour traces the history of the Voting Rights Act and the role independent commissions can play in ensuring that such facially neutral procedures do not have a disparate impact on minority communities. Armour advocates for independent commissions to take the place left empty by the Supreme Court’s rejection of the old preclearance formula suggesting that these commissions are ...