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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Reports Of Cases In The Court Of Exchequer In The Time Of King Charles Ii, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2017

Reports Of Cases In The Court Of Exchequer In The Time Of King Charles Ii, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

This volume is an edition of the reports of cases from the Court of Exchequer during the reign of King Charles II, 1660 to 1685, which have been found to date. It includes a new edition of most of the reports already in print as well as all of those found only in manuscript. Several very long reports already in print are not included, but references to them can be found at the relevant places here. Also, it does not include the reports by Sir Thomas Hardres, which were first printed in 1693, nor the equity cases, which were published ...


Law Books In The Libraries Of Colonial Virginians, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2017

Law Books In The Libraries Of Colonial Virginians, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

Of all professionals, lawyers are the most dependent on books. All of their resource material is in written form. To know the quality of the practicing bar, the bench, legal studies, and legal scholarship in general, one must know the books on which they are founded. A census of law books present in the libraries of colonial Virginians can shed some light on the law and the lawyers who shaped the colony and the nation.


English Statutes In Virginia, 1660-1714, John R. Pagan Jan 2017

English Statutes In Virginia, 1660-1714, John R. Pagan

Law Faculty Publications

Virginia had a government of dual legislative authorities in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Under the transatlantic const itution- an evolving framework of legal relations within England's empire- both the Crown and the General Assembly had jurisdiction to prescribe laws for the colony. The Crown occasionally required Virginians to enforce acts of Parliament, but for the most part the imperial government allowed colonists to deviate from the metropolitan model and enact legislation tailored to their own needs, provided they refrained from passing statutes contrary or repugnant to English law. Instead of delineating separate spheres of imperial and provincial ...