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Legal History Commons

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2017

Faculty Scholarship

Discipline
Institution
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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Hounds Of Empire: Forensic Dog Tracking In Britain And Its Colonies, 1888-1953, Binyamin Blum Aug 2017

The Hounds Of Empire: Forensic Dog Tracking In Britain And Its Colonies, 1888-1953, Binyamin Blum

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Contemplating Masterpiece Cakeshop, Terri R. Day Jan 2017

Contemplating Masterpiece Cakeshop, Terri R. Day

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Technological Triggers To Tort Revolutions: Steam Locomotives, Autonomous Vehicles, And Accident Compensation, Donald G. Gifford Jan 2017

Technological Triggers To Tort Revolutions: Steam Locomotives, Autonomous Vehicles, And Accident Compensation, Donald G. Gifford

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Franklin Delano Roosevelt As Lord Of The Admiralty 1913-1920, Joseph Sweeney Jan 2017

Franklin Delano Roosevelt As Lord Of The Admiralty 1913-1920, Joseph Sweeney

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Mother. Orator. Woman Suffrage Leader: The Feminist Legacy Of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Paula A. Monopoli Jan 2017

Mother. Orator. Woman Suffrage Leader: The Feminist Legacy Of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Paula A. Monopoli

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Collaborative Divorce: What Louis Brandeis Might Say About The Promise And Problems?, Susan Saab Fortney Jan 2017

Collaborative Divorce: What Louis Brandeis Might Say About The Promise And Problems?, Susan Saab Fortney

Faculty Scholarship

If you ask legal ethics scholars what they remember about Louis D. Brandeis's judicial confirmation hearings, most would point to the manner in which he responded to questions about his representation of persons with perceived conflicts of interest. Louis Brandeis responded to challenges by stating that he was "counsel for the situation. Some use this comment when examining problems associated with a single lawyer representing multiple clients in the same transaction. Others believe that Brandeis may have been referring to a type of intermediary role in which lawyers attempt to adjust the rights and interests of multiple clients with ...


Strategic Law Avoidance Using The Internet: A Short History, Tim Wu Jan 2017

Strategic Law Avoidance Using The Internet: A Short History, Tim Wu

Faculty Scholarship

We are now some twenty years into the story of the Internet's bold challenge to law and the legal system. In the early 2000s, Jack Goldsmith and I wrote Who Controls the Internet, a book that might be understood as a chronicle of some the early and more outlandish stages of the story. Professors Pollman and Barry's excellent article, Regulatory Entrepreneurship, adds to and updates that story with subsequent chapters and a sophisticated analysis of the strategies more recently employed to avoid law using the Internet in some way. While Pollman and Barry's article stands on its ...


I Dissent: The Federal Circuit’S “Great Dissenter,” Her Influence On The Patent Dialogue, And Why It Matters, 19 Vand. J. Ent. & Tech. 873 (2017), Daryl Lim Jan 2017

I Dissent: The Federal Circuit’S “Great Dissenter,” Her Influence On The Patent Dialogue, And Why It Matters, 19 Vand. J. Ent. & Tech. 873 (2017), Daryl Lim

Faculty Scholarship

This Article is the first study to comprehensively explore the centrality of the patent dialogue at the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the nation’s principal patent court from empirical, doctrinal, and policy perspectives. It offers several insights into how the Federal Circuit reaches consensus and when it does not, serving as a window into its inner workings, a reference to academics, judges, and attorneys alike. More broadly, this Article provides a template to study the “legal dialogue” of other judges at the Federal Circuit, those in other Circuits, as well as those in other areas of the ...


Fear And Firearms, Darrell A. H. Miller Jan 2017

Fear And Firearms, Darrell A. H. Miller

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


James Dewitt Andrews: Classifying The Law In The Early Twentieth Century*, Richard A. Danner Jan 2017

James Dewitt Andrews: Classifying The Law In The Early Twentieth Century*, Richard A. Danner

Faculty Scholarship

This paper examines the efforts of New York lawyer James DeWitt Andrews and others to create a new classification system for American law in the early years of the twentieth century. Inspired by fragments left by founding father James Wilson, Andrews worked though the American Bar Association and organized independent projects to classify the law. A controversial figure, whose motives were often questioned, Andrews engaged the support and at times the antagonism of prominent legal figures such as John H. Wigmore, Roscoe Pound, and William Howard Taft before his plans ended with the founding of the American Law Institute in ...


A Challenge To Bleached Out Professional Identity: How Jewish Was Justice Louis Brandeis?, Russell G. Pearce, Adam B. Winer, Emily Jenab Jan 2017

A Challenge To Bleached Out Professional Identity: How Jewish Was Justice Louis Brandeis?, Russell G. Pearce, Adam B. Winer, Emily Jenab

Faculty Scholarship

As an exemplar, Justice Louis D. Brandeis challenges the currently dominant conception that requires lawyers to, in Sanford Levinson's term, "bleach out" their personal identity from their professional identity. Under the dominant neutral partisan vision of the lawyer, clients will only receive the equal representation necessary to provide equal justice if lawyers exclude all personal and group identifications from their role. Brandeis, in contrast, asserted that his Jewish identity constructed his understanding of himself as a jurist. His distinguished career thereby provides a counter-narrative to bleaching-out that can serve as a model for all lawyers, whatever their personal and ...


Is Miranda Good News Or Bad News For The Police: The Usefulness Of Empirical Evidence, Meghan J. Ryan Jan 2017

Is Miranda Good News Or Bad News For The Police: The Usefulness Of Empirical Evidence, Meghan J. Ryan

Faculty Scholarship

The U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark case of Miranda v. Arizona created a culture in which police officers regularly warn arrestees that they have a right to remain silent, that anything they say can and will be used against them in a court of law, that they have the right to an attorney, and that if they cannot afford one, an attorney will be appointed to them. These Miranda warnings have a number of possible effects. The warnings are meant to inform suspects about negative consequences associated with speaking to the police without the assistance of counsel. In this ...