Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 28 of 28

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Dean's Desk: Past And Present, Women Play Key Roles At Iu Maurer, Austen L. Parrish Nov 2017

Dean's Desk: Past And Present, Women Play Key Roles At Iu Maurer, Austen L. Parrish

Austen Parrish (2014-)

Under first lady Laurie Burns McRobbie’s leadership, Indiana University founded Women’s Philanthropy as one way to celebrate alumnae leadership and to make the achievements of our most talented and trailblazing women graduates more visible. As the IU Maurer School of Law’s 175th year draws to a close, consistent with these larger University efforts, it’s an opportune time to celebrate some of the law school’s extraordinary women graduates. Their stories are powerful and inspiring, and I’m pleased to share just a few.


Law Library Blog (November 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Nov 2017

Law Library Blog (November 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Women In The Legal Profession From The 1920s To The 1970s: What Can We Learn From Their Experience About Law And Social Change?, Cynthia Grant Bowman Oct 2017

Women In The Legal Profession From The 1920s To The 1970s: What Can We Learn From Their Experience About Law And Social Change?, Cynthia Grant Bowman

Maine Law Review

I work in a law school building that is named for Jane M.G. Foster, who donated the money for its construction. It’s a lovely building, and my office overlooks a gorge so that I can hear the water fall as I write. So I’m grateful to Jane Foster. And curious. Who was she? Jane Foster graduated from Cornell Law School in 1918, having served as an editor of the law review and being elected to the Order of the Coif. But no law firm wanted her services. She obtained employment not as a lawyer but as a ...


Ethics And The “Root Of All Evil” In Nineteenth Century American Law Practice, Michael Hoeflich Oct 2017

Ethics And The “Root Of All Evil” In Nineteenth Century American Law Practice, Michael Hoeflich

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

This Article discusses the bifurcated notions on the purpose of working as an attorney—whether the purpose is to attain wealth or whether the work in and of itself is the purpose. This Article explores the sentiments held by distinguished and influential nineteenth-century lawyers—particularly David Hoffman and George Sharswood—regarding the legal ethics surrounding attorney’s fees and how money in general is the root of many ethical dilemmas within the arena of legal practice. Through the texts of Hoffman and Sharswood, we find the origins of the ethical rules all American attorneys are subject to in their various ...


Introduction To Section Iv: Reflections About Legal Education, Laurel Terry Oct 2017

Introduction To Section Iv: Reflections About Legal Education, Laurel Terry

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


College Graduation As An Entrance Requirement To Law Schools, W. Harrison Hitchler Oct 2017

College Graduation As An Entrance Requirement To Law Schools, W. Harrison Hitchler

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


“The Lost Lawyer” Regained: The Abiding Values Of The Legal Profession, Robert Maccrate Oct 2017

“The Lost Lawyer” Regained: The Abiding Values Of The Legal Profession, Robert Maccrate

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Changing The Modal Law School: Rethinking U.S. Legal Education In (Most) Schools, Nancy B. Rapoport Oct 2017

Changing The Modal Law School: Rethinking U.S. Legal Education In (Most) Schools, Nancy B. Rapoport

Dickinson Law Review

This essay argues that discussions of educational reform in U.S. law schools have suffered from a fundamental misconception: that the education provided in all of the American Bar Association-accredited schools is roughly the same. A better description of the educational opportunities provided by ABA-accredited law schools would group the schools into three rough clusters: the “elite” law schools, the modal (most frequently occurring) law schools, and the precarious law schools. Because the elite law schools do not need much “reforming,” the better focus of reform would concentrate on the modal and precarious schools; however, both elite and modal law ...


Introduction To Section V: Facilitating Dialogue With And About The Profession, Maureen Weidman Oct 2017

Introduction To Section V: Facilitating Dialogue With And About The Profession, Maureen Weidman

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Law Firm Economics And Professionalism, Ward Bower Oct 2017

Law Firm Economics And Professionalism, Ward Bower

Dickinson Law Review

Both Dean Kronman in The Lost Lawyer and Professor Glendon in A Nation Under Lawyers attribute some of the problems and challenges facing lawyers today to economic pressures and to a preoccupation with profits and fees. For Kronman, this economic focus interferes with the “moral detachment” necessary for achievement of the “lawyer-statesman” ideal. For Glendon, professional dilemmas caused by the deterioration of the legal economy, competition in the marketplace, lawyer-shopping by clients, early specialization, lack of mentoring and emphasis on the billable hour have created an unhappy generation of ethically challenged practitioners.

Both authors accurately assess the state of the ...


Lawyers In The Mist: The Golden Age Of Legal Nostalgia, Marc Galanter Oct 2017

Lawyers In The Mist: The Golden Age Of Legal Nostalgia, Marc Galanter

Dickinson Law Review

No one watching the contemporary furor over the litigation explosion and lawsuits devouring America can fail to be impressed by the power of folklore to overwhelm workaday organized social knowledge. Time and again, the protestations of bean-counters and skeptics are vanquished by stories about perverse institutions peopled by malingering plaintiffs, greedy lawyers, capricious jurors, and arrogant judges, proving yet again that it is not what is so that matters, but what people—at least for the moment—think is so. Tenacious belief may not make it so, but can have powerful effects.

In this essay I address another cluster of ...


Introduction To Section Vi: Understanding And Improving Our Judicial System, Hanna Borsilli Oct 2017

Introduction To Section Vi: Understanding And Improving Our Judicial System, Hanna Borsilli

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Justice Blackmun And Individual Rights, Diane P. Wood Oct 2017

Justice Blackmun And Individual Rights, Diane P. Wood

Dickinson Law Review

Of the many contributions Justice Blackmun has made to American jurisprudence, surely his record in the area of individual rights stands out for its importance. Throughout his career on the Supreme Court, he has displayed concern for a wide variety of individual and civil rights. He has rendered decisions on matters ranging from the most personal interests in autonomy and freedom from interference from government in life’s private realms, to the increasingly complex problems posed by discrimination based upon race, sex, national origin, alienage, illegitimacy, sexual orientation, and other characteristics. As his views have become well known to the ...


Justice Blackmun And Preclusion In The State-Federal Context, Karen Nelson Moore Oct 2017

Justice Blackmun And Preclusion In The State-Federal Context, Karen Nelson Moore

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Our Courts, Ourselves: How The Alternative Dispute Resolution Movement Is Re-Shaping Our Legal System, Deborah R. Hensler Oct 2017

Our Courts, Ourselves: How The Alternative Dispute Resolution Movement Is Re-Shaping Our Legal System, Deborah R. Hensler

Dickinson Law Review

Twenty-seven years ago, Professor Frank Sander urged American lawyers and judges to re-imagine the civil courts as a collection of dispute resolution procedures tailored to fit the variety of disputes that parties bring to the justice system. Professor Sander’s vision of the justice system encompassed traditional litigation leading to trial, but his speech at the 1976 Roscoe Pound Conference drew attention to alternatives to traditional dispute resolution that he argued would better serve disputants and society than traditional adversarial processes.

Today, interest in dispute resolution is high. This interest cuts across many domains, ranging from the family, to the ...


Introduction To Section I: In The Beginning . . . Volume 1 And What It Means To Be A Lawyer, Kristina J. Kim Oct 2017

Introduction To Section I: In The Beginning . . . Volume 1 And What It Means To Be A Lawyer, Kristina J. Kim

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Baccalaureate Address Delivered By Charles B. Lore, Ll.D., Chief Justice Of The Delaware Supreme Court, Charles B. Lore Oct 2017

Baccalaureate Address Delivered By Charles B. Lore, Ll.D., Chief Justice Of The Delaware Supreme Court, Charles B. Lore

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Eying The Body: The Impact Of Classical Rules For Demeanor Credibility, Bias, And The Need To Blind Legal Decision Makers, Daphne O’Regan Sep 2017

Eying The Body: The Impact Of Classical Rules For Demeanor Credibility, Bias, And The Need To Blind Legal Decision Makers, Daphne O’Regan

Pace Law Review

This Article focuses on law students and attorneys, not parties, witnesses, experts, and others. Part I briefly provides background: the pivotal role of classical rhetoric in western education, including the United States, the dispositive position of demeanor credibility in oral trial, and the persistent doubts about its reliability—doubts turned into certainty over two decades of research. Part II compares modern and ancient manuals to explain the rules of elite demeanor and its ideological claim to truth. Part III compares ancient and modern understanding of popular delivery; that is, choices in non-verbal communication that run counter to the elite rules ...


Discovering Cases: Year Books, Reporters & Beyond, Laurel Davis Sep 2017

Discovering Cases: Year Books, Reporters & Beyond, Laurel Davis

Rare Book Room Exhibition Programs

Exhibition program from a Fall 2017 exhibit presented in the Daniel R. Coquillette Rare Book Room at the Boston College Law Library. The exhibit explored the publishing history of legal cases from early English Year Books to the early days of the case books still used in law school classrooms.


Golden Gate University School Of Law: A Bridge To The Profession In The Heart Of San Francisco, Rachel A. Van Cleave Aug 2017

Golden Gate University School Of Law: A Bridge To The Profession In The Heart Of San Francisco, Rachel A. Van Cleave

Golden Gate University Law Review

An over 115-year San Francisco institution devoted to opening legal education and the profession to people of diverse backgrounds and experiences, Golden Gate University School of Law (GGU Law) has been a cornerstone of the Bay Area legal community. GGU Law’s mission, graduates, and academic leaders have played an integral role to the fabric of the San Francisco Bay Area legal community and that has shaped a progressive use of the law that seeks to protect the rights of those who otherwise lack a strong political or legal voice. These contributions continue to reverberate throughout California and beyond. This ...


The Return Of The Self, Or Whatever Happened To Postmodern Jurisprudence, Stephen M. Feldman Jan 2017

The Return Of The Self, Or Whatever Happened To Postmodern Jurisprudence, Stephen M. Feldman

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Postmodern jurisprudence was all the rage in the 1990s. Two of the most renowned postmodernists, Stanley Fish and Pierre Schlag, both persistently criticized mainstream legal scholars for believing they were modernist selves—independent, sovereign, and autonomous agents who could remake the social and legal world merely by writing a law review article. Then Fish and Schlag turned on each other. Each attacked the other for making the same mistake: harboring a modernist self. I revisit this skirmish for two reasons. First, it helps explain the current moribund state of postmodern jurisprudence. If two of the leading postmodernists could not avoid ...


Exploring The Origins Of America's Adversarial Legal Culture, Edward A. Purcell Jr. Jan 2017

Exploring The Origins Of America's Adversarial Legal Culture, Edward A. Purcell Jr.

Other Publications

No abstract provided.


Washington University School Of Law’S Global Trajectory, Leila Nadya Sadat Jan 2017

Washington University School Of Law’S Global Trajectory, Leila Nadya Sadat

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay discusses the changing nature of legal education, focusing on the movement from national to global law schools, specifically within the context of globalization. Sadat details the development of international and comparative legal education at Washington University and reflects on their benefit to the School’s reputation. Sadat closes with a discussion of “Global Trumpism,” its potential impact on the Pax Americana, and the resulting effect on Washington University’s international and comparative legal education programs.


Universal Clinic Legal Education: Necessary And Feasible, Robert R. Kuehn Jan 2017

Universal Clinic Legal Education: Necessary And Feasible, Robert R. Kuehn

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay analyzes the data surrounding clinical education in law schools. Kuehn compares the legal education experience to other professional schools, noting that the legal field does not take the steps to prepare law students for the professional field that other schools do. Kuehn argues that a mandated clinical experience for all students is both not costly to obtain and feasible to immediately implement. Kuehn concludes his argument by calling for required clinical training in ABA-approved law schools to ensure practice-ready professionals.


Beyond Stamp Collecting: Ronald Coase And “Scientific” Legal Scholarship, John N. Drobak Jan 2017

Beyond Stamp Collecting: Ronald Coase And “Scientific” Legal Scholarship, John N. Drobak

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay argues that legal scholarship is properly considered a highly technical field of study rather than a system based on classifications. Drobak concedes that excellent legal scholarship requires a complex system of classifications akin to “stamp collecting.” Drobak then makes a case for legal research as a technical science requiring an interdisciplinary approach to confront new issues and further develop current legal doctrines.


Race And Law School: The Intersection Of Obstacles For Aspiring Black Lawyers, Hope Smith Jan 2017

Race And Law School: The Intersection Of Obstacles For Aspiring Black Lawyers, Hope Smith

Summer Program for Undergraduate Research (SPUR)

Recent data of the legal profession have raised red flags about the lack of diversity in the field as compared to other career choices. Due to the fact that 4 of 5 lawyers are white, this leaves very little room for black lawyers to fill jobs in their desired positions. This paper first establishes the literary origins of the black lawyer and succinctly follows the progression made to the emergence of corporate law as an attractive legal sector for black lawyers and further analyzes the connection of the two. Using the survey data, the paper gathers and explains lived experiences ...


Law Library Blog (January 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Jan 2017

Law Library Blog (January 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Embracing New (And Old) Ideas, James E. Daily Jan 2017

Embracing New (And Old) Ideas, James E. Daily

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay, by James E. Daily, lecturer at Washington University School of Law, identifies current declines in the demand for legal education and the greater job market offers a possible solution—re-introducing the LL.B degree. Daily looks at the historical increases in demand that led to the acceptance of the J.D. as the standard law degree required for practice. Daily proposes law schools should re-organize the current J.D. program to become a research or theory-focused advanced degree, and re-introduce the LL.B undergraduate LL.B degree that integrates the use and creation of new technologies in legal ...