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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Colpa E Legge Fra Oriente E Occidente, Pier Giuseppe Monateri Sep 2009

Colpa E Legge Fra Oriente E Occidente, Pier Giuseppe Monateri

Pier Giuseppe Monateri

The Fault and the Law between East and West. In this article Monateri traces an unpreviewed parallel between two absolutely western paradigms and two remarkably chinese thoughts. First a parallel between Carl Schmitt and Xun Zi when the latter writes that “The superior man is the source of the Law” Secondo economic analysis and Lao Zi theory of law a san emerging order not a predetermined one.


Sacrifice And Civic Membership: The Case Of World War I, Julie Novkov Mar 2009

Sacrifice And Civic Membership: The Case Of World War I, Julie Novkov

Julie Novkov

In the Civil War and World War II, many men of color gained rights while women's rights were in retrograde. While World War I is not a perfect mirror image of the Civil War and World War II, it may make sense to think of World War I as reversing the polarities that were in operation in the two other major conflicts. To understand this dynamic, this paper will explore the kinds of claims that men of color and women made for rights based in forms of civic service and sacrifice, how those claims were met by various state ...


Justice Without Power Is Inefficient ; Power Without Justice Is Tyranny, Rajesh Deoli Jan 2009

Justice Without Power Is Inefficient ; Power Without Justice Is Tyranny, Rajesh Deoli

Rajesh Deoli

Power always pretends to be a dangerous thing only when it is exercised; juridically it is a matter of one’s liberty. Liberty begins where duty ends and it is the residue left untouched by Judges & Legislators on a matter. So there are mainly two types of liberties: 1.Which is recognized by law, for e.g. 'Parliamentary privileges’ in debates & ‘judicial privileges’, both connote the absence of a duty not to utter defamatory statements. Secondly: 2.which is not recognized by the law. So the limit over the power is needed i.e. Rule of law restraining such powers ...


Human Rights And Genocide: The Work Of Lauterpacht And Lemkin In Modern International Law, Part I, Ana Filipa Vrdoljak Jan 2009

Human Rights And Genocide: The Work Of Lauterpacht And Lemkin In Modern International Law, Part I, Ana Filipa Vrdoljak

Ana Filipa Vrdoljak

2008 marked the sixtieth anniversary of the adoption of the Genocide Convention and Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the UN General Assembly. These two instruments adopted and proclaimed by then newly formed world body on successive days, 9 and 10 December 1948 respectively, represent two sides of one coin. Born of the horrors of the 1930s and 40s, the United Nations Charter speaks of human rights and to the importance of the rule of law. The Genocide Convention and UDHR are integral to the pursuit of these aims.

The work of two international lawyers, Hersch Lauterpacht and Raphael Lemkin ...


Global Threads: Weaving The Rule Of Law And The Balance Of Legal Software, Gianluigi Palombella Jan 2009

Global Threads: Weaving The Rule Of Law And The Balance Of Legal Software, Gianluigi Palombella

Gianluigi Palombella

The article shows how the global legal sphere attempts to compensate the lack of a system (hardware) and faces the proliferation of legal normativities (software). The author elaborates on the role of the rule of law: after stressing the ambiguities and the contestability of its current uses in the confrontations between legal orders and regulatory regimes, it is explained that the persistence and promise of the rule of law in the global setting depend on the weaving of a set of meta-rules (a special kind of software) developed through various areas and sources of legalities in the international environment. Eventually ...


Deliberative Democracy And Weak Courts: Constitutional Design In Nascent Democracies, Edsel F. Tupaz Jan 2009

Deliberative Democracy And Weak Courts: Constitutional Design In Nascent Democracies, Edsel F. Tupaz

Edsel F Tupaz

This Article addresses the question of constitutional design in young and transitional democracies. It argues for the adoption of a “weak” form of judicial review, as opposed to “strong” review which typifies much of contemporary adjudication. It briefly describes how the dialogical strain of deliberative democratic theory might well constitute the normative predicate for systems of weak review. In doing so, the Article draws from various judicial practices, from European supranational tribunals to Canadian courts and even Indian jurisprudence. The Article concludes with the suggestion that no judicial apparatus other than the weak structure of judicial review can better incite ...