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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Founding Fathers Reconsidered, Richard B. Bernstein Jan 2009

The Founding Fathers Reconsidered, Richard B. Bernstein

Books

Here is a vividly written and compact overview of the brilliant, flawed, and quarrelsome group of lawyers, politicians, merchants, military men, and clergy known as the "Founding Fathers"--who got as close to the ideal of the Platonic "philosopher-kings" as American or world history has ever seen.

In The Founding Fathers Reconsidered, R. B. Bernstein reveals Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Adams, Hamilton, and the other founders not as shining demigods but as imperfect human beings--people much like us--who nevertheless achieved political greatness. They emerge here as men who sought to transcend their intellectual world even as they were bound by its ...


Fighting For The City In Context: William Nelson And The Legal History Of New York, William P. Lapiana Jan 2009

Fighting For The City In Context: William Nelson And The Legal History Of New York, William P. Lapiana

Articles & Chapters

Professor Ross Sandler has contributed a full review of Fighting for the City to this symposium issue. This short comment is meant to supplement that review by emphasizing topics that are of particular interest to an historian of the American legal profession, and of American legal education in particular and New York City in general. It is also meant to draw some connections between Fighting for the City and two of Professor William Nelson's other works: In Pursuit of Right and Justice, his biography of Edward Weinfeld, a lawyer and judge of the District Court for theSouthern District of ...


The Rise Of The American Adversary System: America Before England, Randolph N. Jonakait Jan 2009

The Rise Of The American Adversary System: America Before England, Randolph N. Jonakait

Articles & Chapters

The standard versions of the adversary system's development show that as more lawyers participated in English criminal trials in eighteenth century England criminal procedure became increasingly adversary. Those versions largely ignore American history which shows that the colonies and early America did not simply adopt the English adversary system but moved to an adversary system in advance of England. This article discusses data and developments indicating America's early adoption of an adversary system, including the American guarantee of a right of counsel, the routine presence of counsel in criminal cases in the colonies and the new United States ...