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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Warren Court, Legalism And Democracy: Sketch For A Critique In A Style Learned From Morton Horwitz, William H. Simon Jan 2009

The Warren Court, Legalism And Democracy: Sketch For A Critique In A Style Learned From Morton Horwitz, William H. Simon

Faculty Scholarship

Morton Horwitz's Transformation books developed a critical approach that elaborates the underlying premises of legal doctrine and compares them to suppressed or ignored alternative perspectives. However, Horwitz's Warren Court book is largely an appreciation of the Court's doctrine that accepts at face value its underlying premises and the judges' claim to vindicate democratic values. In this essay, I speculate on what a Transformation-style critique of the Warren Court might look like and suggest that the Court is vulnerable to criticisms analogous to those the Transformation books make of earlier doctrine. I suggest that book ignores an alternative ...


Assessing Chinese Legal Reforms, Benjamin L. Liebman Jan 2009

Assessing Chinese Legal Reforms, Benjamin L. Liebman

Faculty Scholarship

Over the past thirty years China has engaged in what is perhaps the most rapid development of any legal system in the history of the world. The Chinese legal system has been fundamentally transformed since 1978. At the beginning of the reform era there were few laws or trained personnel. Today, China has sophisticated legal institutions, thousands of laws and regulations, and the third largest number of lawyers in the world. Law has begun to regulate both state and individual behavior in ways that were inconceivable in 1978. Commitment to the rule of law has become an important part of ...


A Convenient Constitution? Extraterritoriality After Boumediene, Christina Duffy Ponsa-Kraus Jan 2009

A Convenient Constitution? Extraterritoriality After Boumediene, Christina Duffy Ponsa-Kraus

Faculty Scholarship

Questions concerning the extraterritorial applicability of the Constitution have come to the fore during the "war on terror." In Boumediene v. Bush, the Supreme Court held that noncitizens detained in Guantánamo have the right to challenge their detention in federal court. To reach this conclusion, the Court used the "impracticable and anomalous" test, also known as the 'functional" approach because of its reliance on pragmatic or consequentialist considerations. The test first appeared in a concurring opinion over fifty years ago; in Boumediene, it garnered the votes of a majority.

This Article argues that the Boumediene Court was right to hold ...