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Articles 1 - 17 of 17

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Recent Additions To The Collection - Fall 2009: An Illustrated Guide To The Exhibit, Karen S. Beck Sep 2009

Recent Additions To The Collection - Fall 2009: An Illustrated Guide To The Exhibit, Karen S. Beck

Rare Book Room Exhibition Programs

Exhibition program from a Fall 2009 exhibit presented in the Daniel R. Coquillette Rare Book Room at the Boston College Law Library. Many of the books in the exhibit are described as "works likely to have been owned and used by working English and American lawyers who lived during the fifteenth through nineteenth centuries."


Co-Presenter, Beyond The Ada: How Legal Skills Faculty Can Help Students With 'Non-Visible' Disabilities Bridge The 'Accommodations Gap' Between Law School And Legal Practice, Alexis Anderson Jun 2009

Co-Presenter, Beyond The Ada: How Legal Skills Faculty Can Help Students With 'Non-Visible' Disabilities Bridge The 'Accommodations Gap' Between Law School And Legal Practice, Alexis Anderson

Alexis Anderson

No abstract provided.


A Law Student Collects: Simon Greenlear And Michael Morales: Spring 2009, Karen S. Beck, Michael Morales Apr 2009

A Law Student Collects: Simon Greenlear And Michael Morales: Spring 2009, Karen S. Beck, Michael Morales

Rare Book Room Exhibition Programs

Exhibition program from a Spring 2009 exhibit presented in the Daniel R. Coquillette Rare Book Room at the Boston College Law Library. The exhibit featured books, manuscripts, and ephemera related to the early American legal educator Simon Greenleaf.


Jurisprudence: A Beginner's Simple And Practical Guide To Advanced And Complex Legal Theory, 2 The Crit: Critical Stud. J. 62 (2009), Allen R. Kamp Jan 2009

Jurisprudence: A Beginner's Simple And Practical Guide To Advanced And Complex Legal Theory, 2 The Crit: Critical Stud. J. 62 (2009), Allen R. Kamp

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Golden-Age Of Civil Involvement: The Client-Centered Disadvantage For Lawyers As Law Makers, James E. Moliterno Jan 2009

A Golden-Age Of Civil Involvement: The Client-Centered Disadvantage For Lawyers As Law Makers, James E. Moliterno

Faculty Scholarship

None available.


What Oaths Meant To The Framers’ Generation: A Preliminary Sketch, Steve Sheppard Jan 2009

What Oaths Meant To The Framers’ Generation: A Preliminary Sketch, Steve Sheppard

Steve Sheppard

To the Framers’ generation, oaths of office were understood as commitments, both public and personal, which stemmed from a source of morality. Recent discussions have raised concerns over whether or not the closing phrase in many oaths of office, “so help me God,” demonstrates a possible preference by the Framers for religious leaders and commitments to God. Oaths are not only an acceptance of an office itself, but also the acceptance of the office’s obligations. While oaths state an office’s obligations generally, the obligations include all that could be reasonably inferred from the nature of the office, including ...


Foreword - Alinsky Conference, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. Xxv (2009), Walter J. Kendall Iii Jan 2009

Foreword - Alinsky Conference, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. Xxv (2009), Walter J. Kendall Iii

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Fighting For The City In Context: William Nelson And The Legal History Of New York, William P. Lapiana Jan 2009

Fighting For The City In Context: William Nelson And The Legal History Of New York, William P. Lapiana

Articles & Chapters

Professor Ross Sandler has contributed a full review of Fighting for the City to this symposium issue. This short comment is meant to supplement that review by emphasizing topics that are of particular interest to an historian of the American legal profession, and of American legal education in particular and New York City in general. It is also meant to draw some connections between Fighting for the City and two of Professor William Nelson's other works: In Pursuit of Right and Justice, his biography of Edward Weinfeld, a lawyer and judge of the District Court for theSouthern District of ...


Lawyers And The Power Of Community: The Story Of South Ardmore, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 595 (2009), Corey S. Shdaimah Jan 2009

Lawyers And The Power Of Community: The Story Of South Ardmore, 42 J. Marshall L. Rev. 595 (2009), Corey S. Shdaimah

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Book Review: Martin Chanock, The Making Of South African Legal Culture, 1902-1936: Fear, Favour And Prejudice, W. Wesley Pue Jan 2009

Book Review: Martin Chanock, The Making Of South African Legal Culture, 1902-1936: Fear, Favour And Prejudice, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

This review of Martin Chanock's work on South African legal culture, locates the work in the context of international scholarship on law and society, legal history, and law and colonialism. It appeared in 18:1 Canadian Journal of Law & Society, 177-181.


Banned From Lawyering: Gordon Martin, Communist, W. Wesley Pue Jan 2009

Banned From Lawyering: Gordon Martin, Communist, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

This paper assesses the exclusion of Gordon Martin from the practice of law in 1948 solely on the grounds that his communist political commitment was inconsistent with the role of a lawyer. In so doing it canvasses understandings of the day regarding communism, constitutionalism, and American social thought (as embodied in Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Dewey, Charles Beard, James Harvey Robinson, and Thorstein Veblen). Issues relating to self-governance of the legal profession, character, and statutory interpretation under then-current administrative law doctrine are reviewed.


Cowboy Jurists & The Making Of Legal Professionalism, W. Wesley Pue Jan 2009

Cowboy Jurists & The Making Of Legal Professionalism, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

This paper identifies the origins of modern Canadian legal professionalism in the prairie west during the early twentieth century, arguing for the importance of human agency and emphasizing contingency where others assert trans-historical processes. Lawyers combined agendas which were explicitly moral and reforming with a profound restructuring of their profession. Their efforts to reform the curriculum of formal legal education was part of a cultural project, but so too was their desire to attain self-regulation, monopoly, professional independence, and plenary disciplinary powers. The substantive findings documented here direct our attention to questions of cultural agency and structural revolution that are ...


Introduction To Lawyers In Canadian History, W. Wesley Pue Jan 2009

Introduction To Lawyers In Canadian History, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

This paper "frames" the study of lawyers in Canadian history against major interpretations of the legal profession and legal professionalism including the historical self-understandings of organized legal professions in the common law world, market-control theorists, institutional, and cultural history approaches. The article serves as the introduction to a new book on The Promise And Perils Of Law: Lawyers In Canadian History, which includes essays on the history of legal education, the practice of law, Quebec's legal distinctiveness, constitutionalism and the rule of law, and issues in race, gender, and diversity.


Client Activism In Progressive Lawyering Theory, Eduardo R.C. Capulong Jan 2009

Client Activism In Progressive Lawyering Theory, Eduardo R.C. Capulong

Faculty Law Review Articles

In this article the author argues that the aims, contexts, and methods of client activism are paramount in progressive lawyering theory, and as such precede and define the question of how progressives should lawyer. The author suggests precursory paradigms that 1) clarify the ultimate political goals to which activism is and should be directed; 2) analyze the social conditions shaping and defining grassroots activity; and 3) specify and systematize the myriad methods that can and should be used to further these ends. In critiquing prevailing theoretical formulations that relate to these considerations, the author argues that progressive lawyers need to ...


George W. Anderson (1861-1938), Alexis Anderson Dec 2008

George W. Anderson (1861-1938), Alexis Anderson

Alexis Anderson

This book is the first to gather in a single volume concise biographies of the most eminent men and women in the history of American law. Encompassing a wide range of individuals who have devised, replenished, expounded, and explained law, The Yale Biographical Dictionary of American Law presents succinct and lively entries devoted to more than 700 subjects selected for their significant and lasting influence on American law. Casting a wide net, editor Roger K. Newman includes individuals from around the country, from colonial times to the present, encompassing the spectrum of ideologies from left-wing to right, and including a ...


George M. Bourquin (1863-1958), Alexis Anderson Dec 2008

George M. Bourquin (1863-1958), Alexis Anderson

Alexis Anderson

This book is the first to gather in a single volume concise biographies of the most eminent men and women in the history of American law. Encompassing a wide range of individuals who have devised, replenished, expounded, and explained law, The Yale Biographical Dictionary of American Law presents succinct and lively entries devoted to more than 700 subjects selected for their significant and lasting influence on American law. Casting a wide net, editor Roger K. Newman includes individuals from around the country, from colonial times to the present, encompassing the spectrum of ideologies from left-wing to right, and including a ...


Loneliness And The Law: Solitude Action And Power In Law And Literature, Marc L. Roark Dec 2008

Loneliness And The Law: Solitude Action And Power In Law And Literature, Marc L. Roark

Marc L. Roark

How do our thoughts and attitudes impact the law? Is there a correlation between the way the law is decided and the way we as lawyers and scholars approach law? These questions are the ultimate indicators of the direction of law. Traditionally, we assume that law develops artificially--that is, without direct correlation to any particular individual's contribution thereto--with few exceptions. We attribute broader forces to the development of legal movements; social movements and historical moments that ascend to the law. [FN1] In such scenarios, the individual is lost to the broader panoply of thought, rendered as little more than ...