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Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Constitutional Law—Commerce Clause—California Takes A Hit: The Supreme Court Upholds Congressional Authority Over The State-Approved Use Of Medicinal Marijuana. Gonzales V. Raich, 545 U.S. 1 (2005)., Rick Behring Jr. Jul 2006

Constitutional Law—Commerce Clause—California Takes A Hit: The Supreme Court Upholds Congressional Authority Over The State-Approved Use Of Medicinal Marijuana. Gonzales V. Raich, 545 U.S. 1 (2005)., Rick Behring Jr.

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


Precedent In The Federal Courts Of Appeals: An Endangered Or Invasive Species?, John B. Oakley Apr 2006

Precedent In The Federal Courts Of Appeals: An Endangered Or Invasive Species?, John B. Oakley

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Titles Of Nobility, Hereditary Privilege, And The Unconstitutionality Of Legacy Preferences In Public School Admissions, Carlton F. W. Larson Jan 2006

Titles Of Nobility, Hereditary Privilege, And The Unconstitutionality Of Legacy Preferences In Public School Admissions, Carlton F. W. Larson

Washington University Law Review

This Article argues that legacy preferences in public university admissions violate the Constitution's prohibition on titles of nobility. Examining considerable evidence from the late eighteenth century, the Article argues that the Nobility Clauses were not limited to the prohibition of certain distinctive titles, such as “duke” or “earl,” but had a substantive content that included a prohibition on all hereditary privileges with respect to state institutions. The Article places special emphasis on the dispute surrounding the formation of the Society of the Cincinnati, a hereditary organization formed by officers of the Continental Army. This Society was repeatedly denounced by ...


The History Of Slave Marriage In The United States, 39 J. Marshall L. Rev. 299 (2006), Darlene C. Goring Jan 2006

The History Of Slave Marriage In The United States, 39 J. Marshall L. Rev. 299 (2006), Darlene C. Goring

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Resolving The Judicial Paradox Of "Equitable" Relief Under Erisa Section 502(A)(3), 39 J. Marshall L. Rev. 827 (2006), Colleen E. Medill Jan 2006

Resolving The Judicial Paradox Of "Equitable" Relief Under Erisa Section 502(A)(3), 39 J. Marshall L. Rev. 827 (2006), Colleen E. Medill

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


The "Priority Statute" - The United States' "Ace-In-The-Hole", 39 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1205 (2006), Richard H.W. Maloy Jan 2006

The "Priority Statute" - The United States' "Ace-In-The-Hole", 39 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1205 (2006), Richard H.W. Maloy

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Limiting The Presidency To Natural Born Citizens Violates Due Process, 39 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1343 (2006), Paul A. Clark Jan 2006

Limiting The Presidency To Natural Born Citizens Violates Due Process, 39 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1343 (2006), Paul A. Clark

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Dostoyevsky And The Therapeutic Jurisprudence Confession, 40 J. Marshall L. Rev. 41 (2006), Amy D. Ronner Jan 2006

Dostoyevsky And The Therapeutic Jurisprudence Confession, 40 J. Marshall L. Rev. 41 (2006), Amy D. Ronner

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Second Chance For Justice: Reevaluation Of The United States Double Jeopardy Standard, 40 J. Marshall L. Rev. 371 (2006), Andrea Koklys Jan 2006

Second Chance For Justice: Reevaluation Of The United States Double Jeopardy Standard, 40 J. Marshall L. Rev. 371 (2006), Andrea Koklys

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Race Nuisance: The Politics Of Law In The Jim Crow Era, Rachel D. Godsil Jan 2006

Race Nuisance: The Politics Of Law In The Jim Crow Era, Rachel D. Godsil

Michigan Law Review

This Article explores a startling and previously unnoticed line of cases in which state courts in the Jim Crow era ruled against white plaintiffs trying to use common law nuisance doctrine to achieve residential segregation. These "race-nuisance" cases complicate the view of most legal scholarship that state courts during the Jim Crow era openly eschewed the rule of law in service of white supremacy. Instead, the cases provide rich social historical detail showing southern judges wrestling with their competing allegiances to both precedent and the pursuit of racial exclusivity. Surprisingly, the allegiance to precedent generally prevailed. The cases confound prevailing ...