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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Death Squads Or 'Directions Over Lunch': A Comparative Review Of The Independence Of The Bar, W. Wesley Pue Jan 2006

Death Squads Or 'Directions Over Lunch': A Comparative Review Of The Independence Of The Bar, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

Periodic crises around the conduct of lawyers provoke moves in the direction of constituting the organized legal profession as a regulated industry, much like any other. Such proposals, whether for regulation through Legal Services Commissions or other structures, abruptly confront the historically embedded constitutional notion that liberty itself rests on the independence of the bar. This paper engages in a comparative review of the notion of an independent legal profession. Its particular focus is on widely agreed international standards and on the experience of Commonwealth countries and especially Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The paper draws on literatures from ...


Educating The Total Jurist?, W. Wesley Pue Jan 2006

Educating The Total Jurist?, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

This paper discusses a discontinuity between the ways in which legal education has historically sought to reconstruct the soul of lawyers-in-training and the contemporary conceit that legal education can be value-free. It identifies a gap between early 21st century narrowly technocratic approaches to legal professionalism - epitomized by Enron professionalism and earlier conceptions of lawyering. A desire to instill a moral sensibility in apprentice lawyers weighed heavily in an earlier generation's thinking about legal education everywhere in the common law world, giving rise to the programmes, schemes, and imaginings that provided templates for contemporary university legal training. With surprising consistency ...