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Legal History Commons

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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Boggs V. Boggs: Creating Real-Life Cinderellas, 33 J. Marshall L. Rev. 271 (1999), Heather J. Rose Jan 1999

Boggs V. Boggs: Creating Real-Life Cinderellas, 33 J. Marshall L. Rev. 271 (1999), Heather J. Rose

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Nomadic Notaries, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 985 (1999), Malcolm L. Morris Jan 1999

Nomadic Notaries, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 985 (1999), Malcolm L. Morris

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Proposed Code Of Ethics For Employers And Customers Of Notaries: A Companion To The Notary Public Code Of Professional Responsibility, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 887 (1999), John C. Anderson, Michael L. Colsen Jan 1999

A Proposed Code Of Ethics For Employers And Customers Of Notaries: A Companion To The Notary Public Code Of Professional Responsibility, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 887 (1999), John C. Anderson, Michael L. Colsen

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Arthur J. Goldberg's Legacies To American Labor Relations, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 667 (1999), Gerald Berendt, Gil Cornfield, Peter Edelman Jan 1999

Arthur J. Goldberg's Legacies To American Labor Relations, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 667 (1999), Gerald Berendt, Gil Cornfield, Peter Edelman

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


From Group Rights To Individual Liberties: Post-War Labor Law, Liberalism, And The Waning Of Union Strength, Reuel E. Schiller Jan 1999

From Group Rights To Individual Liberties: Post-War Labor Law, Liberalism, And The Waning Of Union Strength, Reuel E. Schiller

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Caste, Class, And Equal Citizenship, William E. Forbath Jan 1999

Caste, Class, And Equal Citizenship, William E. Forbath

Michigan Law Review

There is a familiar egalitarian constitutional tradition and another we have largely forgotten. The familiar one springs from Brown v. Board of Education; its roots lie in the Reconstruction era. Court-centered and countermajoritarian, it takes aim at caste and racial subordination. The forgotten one also originated with Reconstruction, but it was a majoritarian tradition, addressing its arguments to lawmakers and citizens, not to courts. Aimed against harsh class inequalities, it centered on decent work and livelihoods, social provision, and a measure of economic independence and democracy. Borrowing a phrase from its Progressive Era proponents, I will call it the social ...