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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Comments Celebrating The 100th Anniversary Of The West Virginia Law Review, David C. Hardesty Jr. Sep 1997

Comments Celebrating The 100th Anniversary Of The West Virginia Law Review, David C. Hardesty Jr.

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


An Informal History Of How Law Schools Evaluate Students, With A Predictable Emphasis On Law School Exams, Steve Sheppard Jan 1997

An Informal History Of How Law Schools Evaluate Students, With A Predictable Emphasis On Law School Exams, Steve Sheppard

Steve Sheppard

This story of the evolution of legal evaluations from the seventeenth century to the close of the twentieth depicts English influences on American law student evaluations, which have waned in the twentieth century with the advent of course-end examinations. Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English examinations given to conclude a legal degree were relatively ceremonial exercises in which performance was often based on the demonstration of rote memory. As examination processes evolved, American law schools adopted essay evaluations from their English counterparts. Examinees in the nineteenth century were given a narrative, requiring the recognition of particularly appropriate legal doctrines, enunciation of the ...


Saints And Sinners: How Does Delaware Corporate Law Work?, Edward B. Rock Jan 1997

Saints And Sinners: How Does Delaware Corporate Law Work?, Edward B. Rock

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


New Opportunities For Defense Attorneys: How Record Preservation Requirements After The New Habeas Bill Require Extensive And Exciting Trail Preparation, 30 J. Marshall L. Rev. 389 (1997), Andrea D. Lyon Jan 1997

New Opportunities For Defense Attorneys: How Record Preservation Requirements After The New Habeas Bill Require Extensive And Exciting Trail Preparation, 30 J. Marshall L. Rev. 389 (1997), Andrea D. Lyon

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Habeas Corpus And The New Federalism After The Anti-Terrorism And Effective Death Penalty Act Of 1996, 30 J. Marshall L. Rev. 337 (1997), Marshall J. Hartman, Jeanette Nyden Jan 1997

Habeas Corpus And The New Federalism After The Anti-Terrorism And Effective Death Penalty Act Of 1996, 30 J. Marshall L. Rev. 337 (1997), Marshall J. Hartman, Jeanette Nyden

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Reflections On A Quarter-Century Of Constitutional Regulation Of Capital Punishment, 30 J. Marshall L. Rev. 399 (1997), Joseph Bessetre, Stephen Bright, George Kendall, William Kunkle, Carol Steiker, Jordan Steiker Jan 1997

Reflections On A Quarter-Century Of Constitutional Regulation Of Capital Punishment, 30 J. Marshall L. Rev. 399 (1997), Joseph Bessetre, Stephen Bright, George Kendall, William Kunkle, Carol Steiker, Jordan Steiker

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


An Analysis Of People, For Michigan Republic, Ex Rel V. State Of Michigan, 30 J. Marshall L. Rev. 937 (1997), Phillip A. Hendges Jan 1997

An Analysis Of People, For Michigan Republic, Ex Rel V. State Of Michigan, 30 J. Marshall L. Rev. 937 (1997), Phillip A. Hendges

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Coping With Partiality: Justice, The Rule Of Law, And The Role Of Lawyers, Randy E. Barnett Jan 1997

Coping With Partiality: Justice, The Rule Of Law, And The Role Of Lawyers, Randy E. Barnett

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Lawyers help ameliorate a particular instance of what the author calls the problem of interest--the partiality problem. For he believes that it falls to law professors to imbue in their students an understanding of the important role that lawyers play in society, if for no other reason than they will need some emotional armament from the slings and arrows of incessant lawyer jokes and worse. In explaining how the existence of lawyers helps address the problem of partiality, the author also explains how adherence to property rights, freedom of contract, and the rule of law--concepts long disparaged by law professors--help ...