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Intellectual Property Law

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Articles 1 - 30 of 79

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Enough Is As Good As A Feast, Noah C. Chauvin Oct 2020

Enough Is As Good As A Feast, Noah C. Chauvin

Seattle University Law Review

Ipse Dixit, the podcast on legal scholarship, provides a valuable service to the legal community and particularly to the legal academy. The podcast’s hosts skillfully interview guests about their legal and law-related scholarship, helping those guests communicate their ideas clearly and concisely. In this review essay, I argue that Ipse Dixit has made a major contribution to legal scholarship by demonstrating in its interview episodes that law review articles are neither the only nor the best way of communicating scholarly ideas. This contribution should be considered “scholarship,” because one of the primary goals of scholarship is to communicate new ...


Jefferson’S Taper, Jeremy N. Sheff Oct 2020

Jefferson’S Taper, Jeremy N. Sheff

SMU Law Review

This Article reports a new discovery concerning the intellectual genealogy of one of American intellectual property law’s most important texts. The text is Thomas Jefferson’s often-cited letter to Isaac McPherson regarding the absence of a natural right of property in inventions, metaphorically illustrated by a “taper” that spreads light from one person to another without diminishing the light at its source. I demonstrate that Thomas Jefferson likely copied this Parable of the Taper from a nearly identical passage in Cicero’s De Officiis, and I show how this borrowing situates Jefferson’s thoughts on intellectual property firmly within ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Sep 2020

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


Copyright & Fashion: The Shoe That Does Not Fit, Cassandra Baloga Jan 2020

Copyright & Fashion: The Shoe That Does Not Fit, Cassandra Baloga

NYLS Law Review

No abstract provided.


Whiskey Sour: An Ip Evaluation Of Nathan Green's Contribution To Jack Daniel's Whiskey And How That Contribution Led To An Inequitable Distribution Of Generational Wealth Jan 2020

Whiskey Sour: An Ip Evaluation Of Nathan Green's Contribution To Jack Daniel's Whiskey And How That Contribution Led To An Inequitable Distribution Of Generational Wealth

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

None.


Determining Patent Worthlesseness For Tax Purposes Jan 2020

Determining Patent Worthlesseness For Tax Purposes

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

None.


In Memory Of Professor James E. Bond, Janet Ainsworth Jan 2020

In Memory Of Professor James E. Bond, Janet Ainsworth

Seattle University Law Review

Janet Ainsworth, Professor of Law at Seattle University School of Law: In Memory of Professor James E. Bond.


The General Knowledge, Skill, And Experience Paradox, Camilla A. Hrdy Dec 2019

The General Knowledge, Skill, And Experience Paradox, Camilla A. Hrdy

Boston College Law Review

Can employers use trade secret law to prevent employees from using knowledge and skills they acquired on the job? Courts in all fifty states say no—an employee’s general knowledge, skill, and experience cannot be protected as a trade secret. Yet a benchmark principle of trade secret law is that employers can share trade secrets with employees so long as they take reasonable measures to preserve the information’s secrecy. The result is a paradox that runs to the heart of trade secret law: employers are encouraged to communicate trade secrets to employees, but this information loses protection if ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Sep 2019

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


How The United States Stopped Being A Pirate Nation And Learned To Love International Copyright, John A. Rothchild Apr 2019

How The United States Stopped Being A Pirate Nation And Learned To Love International Copyright, John A. Rothchild

Pace Law Review

From the time of the first federal copyright law in 1790 until enactment of the International Copyright Act in 1891, U.S. copyright law did not apply to works by authors who were not citizens or residents of the United States. U.S. publishers took advantage of this lacuna in the law, and the demand among American readers for books by popular British authors, by reprinting the books of these authors without their authorization and without paying a negotiated royalty to them.

This Article tells the story of how proponents of extending copyright protections to foreign authors—called international copyright ...


Privacy, Property, And Publicity, Mark A. Lemley Apr 2019

Privacy, Property, And Publicity, Mark A. Lemley

Michigan Law Review

Review of Jennifer E. Rothman's The Right of Publicity: Privacy Reimagined for a Public World.


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Feb 2019

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Tale Of Sovereignty And Liberalism: The Lockean Myth Of Intellectual Property, Shaoul Sussman Jan 2019

A Tale Of Sovereignty And Liberalism: The Lockean Myth Of Intellectual Property, Shaoul Sussman

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

The influence of John Locke’s thought upon the general legal perception of property rights cannot be overstated. Locke’s Labor theory of property holds that property originally comes about through individual exertion upon natural objects and that legal rights in the result of this labor are in fact property rights. The Lockean theory of property has dominated the Anglo-American legal discourse and is frequently used to justify various property regulation schemes. Despite this fact, many scholars have struggled to apply the theory to the field of intellectual property, and in particular to the field of patents and copyright. Many ...


Property And Equity In Trademark Law, Mark P. Mckenna Jan 2019

Property And Equity In Trademark Law, Mark P. Mckenna

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

This lecture focuses on the relationship between trademark and unfair competition. Specifically, this lecture discusses the way trademark law has evolved over time with respect to property concepts. There has been a lot of discussion in the literature about the ways trademark law has come to treat trademarks as property. Many scholars who have written about this “propertization” have described it as a shift from consumer to producer protection.

I have written a lot about this narrative over the course of my career—I think it is overly simplistic, and in some ways, wrong. Trademark law has al-ways protected marks ...


What Are We To Do With Deposit Copies?, Sadie Zurfluh Jan 2019

What Are We To Do With Deposit Copies?, Sadie Zurfluh

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

One of the problems courts are faced with today is determining what happens with unpublished works registered under the 1909 Act: can only the sheet music filed with the deposit copy come into evidence when comparing two works as substantially similar? In 2015, the district court in Williams v. Gaye addressed the issue; however, the Ninth Circuit declined to decide the issue on appeal.8 Later in 2018, in Skidmore v. Zeppelin (“Skidmore”), the Ninth Circuit concluded that when dealing with unpublished works under the 1909 Act, the deposit copy defines the scope of the copyright. Part I of this ...


Joutsing At Windmills: Cervantes And The Quixotic Fight For Authorial Control, H. Parkman Biggs Jan 2018

Joutsing At Windmills: Cervantes And The Quixotic Fight For Authorial Control, H. Parkman Biggs

Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review

Achieving the appropriate balance between the right of first authors to control the later use of their work and freedom for follow-on authors to further develop from that text has long been challenging. Currently, under United States law in particular, fair use stands as a nebulous to buffer between the two creative camps, granting a significantly limited right to the second author to work from the first authors’ text. While that tension excites its own debate, a less considered aspect of this tension involves the degree to which the first author might be creatively and productively affected by the follow-on ...


"Within The Limits Of The Constitutional Grant": Constitutional Limitations On The Patent Power, Edward C. Walterscheid Oct 2016

"Within The Limits Of The Constitutional Grant": Constitutional Limitations On The Patent Power, Edward C. Walterscheid

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Prostitution Policy: Legalization, Decriminalization And The Nordic Model, Ane Mathieson, Easton Branam, Anya Noble Apr 2016

Prostitution Policy: Legalization, Decriminalization And The Nordic Model, Ane Mathieson, Easton Branam, Anya Noble

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Living Under The Boot: Militarization And Peaceful Protest, Charlotte Guerra Apr 2016

Living Under The Boot: Militarization And Peaceful Protest, Charlotte Guerra

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Let’S Invest In People, Not Prisons: How Washington State Should Address Its Ex-Offender Unemployment Rate, Sara Taboada Apr 2016

Let’S Invest In People, Not Prisons: How Washington State Should Address Its Ex-Offender Unemployment Rate, Sara Taboada

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


His Feminist Facade: The Neoliberal Co-Option Of The Feminist Movement, Anjilee Dodge, Myani Gilbert Apr 2016

His Feminist Facade: The Neoliberal Co-Option Of The Feminist Movement, Anjilee Dodge, Myani Gilbert

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


In Her Words: Recognizing And Preventing Abusive Litigation Against Domestic Violence Survivors, David Ward Apr 2016

In Her Words: Recognizing And Preventing Abusive Litigation Against Domestic Violence Survivors, David Ward

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Don’T Risk It; Wait Until She’S Sober, Patrick John White Apr 2016

Don’T Risk It; Wait Until She’S Sober, Patrick John White

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Let’S Talk About Sex: A Call For Guardianship Reform In Washington State, Sage Graves Apr 2016

Let’S Talk About Sex: A Call For Guardianship Reform In Washington State, Sage Graves

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Persistence And Resistance: Women’S Leadership And Ending Gender-Based Violence In Guatemala, Serena Cosgrove, Kristi Lee Apr 2016

Persistence And Resistance: Women’S Leadership And Ending Gender-Based Violence In Guatemala, Serena Cosgrove, Kristi Lee

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Before Mayo & After Alice: The Changing Concept Of Abstract Ideas, Magnus Gan Jan 2016

Before Mayo & After Alice: The Changing Concept Of Abstract Ideas, Magnus Gan

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

Mayo v. Prometheus and Alice v. CLS are landmark Supreme Court decisions which respectively introduced and then instituted a new, two-step patent-eligibility test. Step One tests the patent claims for abstractness, while Step Two tests for inventive application. This new test was so demanding that in the one-year period after Alice was decided, over 80 percent of all challenged patents had one or more claims invalidated. In fact, at the Federal Circuit over the same time period, only one recorded case of a successful Alice defense exists—DDR Holdings v. Hotels.com. This note explains DDR’s success as an ...


The Effect Of The 1886 Berne Convention On The U.S. Copyright System's Treatment Of Moral Rights And Copyright Term, And Where That Leaves Us Today, Samuel Jacobs Jan 2016

The Effect Of The 1886 Berne Convention On The U.S. Copyright System's Treatment Of Moral Rights And Copyright Term, And Where That Leaves Us Today, Samuel Jacobs

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

The 1886 Berne Convention was the most influential copyright related treaty for over a century, and provided important minimum substantive protections for authors. Key provisions included the establishment of the principle of National Treatment, the abolishment of formalities in order to receive copyright protection, a required copyright term of life of the author plus fifty years, and most offensive to the U.S. copyright system, the mandate that signatories provide authors non-economic moral rights. Despite the international importance and widespread acceptance of the Berne Convention, the U.S. did not join the Convention for over one hundred years, making it ...


From The Statute Of Anne To Z.Z. Top: The Strange World Of American Sound Recordings, How It Came About, And Why It Will Never Go Away, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 1 (2015), Bruce Epperson Jan 2015

From The Statute Of Anne To Z.Z. Top: The Strange World Of American Sound Recordings, How It Came About, And Why It Will Never Go Away, 15 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 1 (2015), Bruce Epperson

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Uniquely among all industrialized nations, the United States extended no copyright protection to sound recordings until 1972. The individual aural representation captured for playback could only be protected by the common or statutory laws of individual states. This feature was carried forward into the comprehensive revision of the Copyright Act implemented on January 1, 1978. Although the Copyright Act contained a sweeping provision that brought works created prior to the legislation under federal protection, pre-1972 sound recordings were specifically exempted. The extent to which this lack of status has created a legal and environmental void is best demonstrated by a ...


Intellectual Property And Gender: Reflections On Accomplishments And Methodology, Kara W. Swanson Jan 2015

Intellectual Property And Gender: Reflections On Accomplishments And Methodology, Kara W. Swanson

American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law

No abstract provided.


Bridging The (Liability) Gap: The Shift Toward § 271(B) Inducement In Akamai Represents A Partial Solution To Divided Infringement, Brett M. Jackson Nov 2013

Bridging The (Liability) Gap: The Shift Toward § 271(B) Inducement In Akamai Represents A Partial Solution To Divided Infringement, Brett M. Jackson

Boston College Law Review

In recent years, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit made it increasingly difficult for patentees of method patents to hold any party liable for infringement in divided infringement cases. As such, the Federal Circuit failed to adequately protect method patentees, leaving a glaring liability loophole in patent infringement jurisprudence. In 2012, however, in Akamai Technologies, Inc. v. Limelight Networks, Inc., the en banc Federal Circuit marked a fundamental shift in its divided infringement jurisprudence, holding that claims practiced by multiple actors could be resolved through an application of inducement infringement. Under this new standard, parties may ...